The School of Social Work

Dean:  Robin Mama, Ph.D.

Assistant Dean: Leah Lazzaro, D.S.W.

Director of the B.S.W. Program: Christa Hogan, Ph.D.

Director of the M.S.W. Program: Michael Cronin, Ph.D., LCSW

Social workers are concerned with improving the health and quality of life of persons who are disconnected or excluded from larger society. Social workers engage in practice at all levels, from working with children to working with communities and governments. The profession and the program at Monmouth are particularly concerned with human rights and social and economic justice, the representation and support of vulnerable or oppressed segments of the population, and direct-action strategies to bring about positive change for the disenfranchised.

The central mission of the School of Social Work at Monmouth University is to prepare its graduates for professional social work practice that strives to secure social and economic justice, advance human rights, and improve the quality of life of vulnerable families, individuals, organizations, communities, and nations on the local, national, and global levels.

The M.S.W. Program at Monmouth University prepares graduates for advanced social work practice in one of two unique concentrations:

On the foundation of a liberal arts tradition, students are engaged to broaden and challenge their understanding, analysis, and evaluation of human experiences and societies in the past and in the contemporary world, and of families and individuals of varied cultural and social contexts.

The curriculum supports this mission through three perspectives:

  1. social and economic justice through the advancement of human rights,
  2. strengths-based empowerment, and
  3. practice with families within a global context.

Families within a global context define the initial focal social unit for all social work practice at Monmouth University.

Our three perspectives inform both our B.S.W. and M.S.W. programs as they contribute to the development of students’ knowledge, values, and skills:

  1. To conceptualize and contribute to social work theory, knowledge, values, and skills on a generalist level for B.S.W. students, and on an advanced, concentration-specific level for M.S.W. students through three interrelated perspectives: social and economic justice through the advancement of human rights, strengths-based empowerment, and practice with families within a global context;
  2. To develop the skills to understand, analyze, and evaluate the quality of life and well-being of vulnerable families, individuals, organizations, communities, and nations that is grounded in a strengths-based empowerment approach for social and economic justice and human rights;
  3. To prepare social work practitioners to develop and systematically apply knowledge, values, skills, and ethics in their work with families, individuals, organizations, communities, and nations of diverse cultural contexts in working collaboratively toward the prevention and solution of social problems;
  4. To think critically, analyze, produce, and disseminate research that informs theory, policy, practice, and evaluation in social work;
  5. To collaborate with and support vulnerable populations through advocacy, social action, volunteerism, service, education, and consultation, working from a strengths-based empowerment approach for social and economic justice and human rights.

School of Social Work Honor Society: Phi Alpha: Graduate and Undergraduate

Master of Social Work Specializations

There are two concentrations offered at Monmouth University at the graduate level:

Common to both specializations is a commitment to the mission of the School of Social Work at Monmouth University: improving the quality of life of vulnerable individuals, families, groups, and communities on the local, national, and international levels.

The courses in the Clinical Practice with Families and Children (C.P.F.C.) specialization prepares students for advanced social work practice with individuals, couples, families, and groups. It builds on the foundation-year course work where the full complement of social work roles was explored. The advanced year, however, focuses primarily on clinical counseling skills and culturally competent use of self in complex working relationships with clients and client groups. While the emphasis is on clients’ strengths, and working together toward their empowerment is continued, students learn about and apply clinical skills to family, children, and mental-health agency settings; child welfare, criminal justice, and host settings in which clinical social work most often takes place.

The Global and Community Practice (G.C.P.) specialization primarily uses community development theory and practice to address developing-world social and economic justice, inequality, oppression, and discrimination issues in developed and developing countries. Culturally competent community development respects the integrity and worth of individuals and communities with diverse backgrounds. G.C.P. focuses the practice of social work at mezzo and macro levels with agencies and client populations within the context of global interdependence of social problems. Courses stress the knowledge, values, skills, and ethics of practice at the mezzo and macro levels, with specific content on the ethics of the International Federation of Social Workers and the declarations of the United Nations.

Students who complete the Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Community-Law Enforcement Community Relations Track will take 12 credits in social work during the course of this degree.  For those students who wish to continue to work towards a Master of Social Work degree, these 12 credits will transfer into the 54-credit MSW, allowing the student to have  42 credits left to complete for the Master of Social Work.

Master of Arts in Criminal Justice - Community-Law Enforcement Relations Track

Students who complete the Master of Arts in Criminal Justice - Law-Enforcement Community Relations Track will take 12 credits in social work during the course of this degree.  For those students who wish to continue to work toward a Master of Social Work degree, these 12 credits will transfer into the 54-credit M.S.W., allowing the student to have 42 credits left to complete for the Master of Social Work.

Graduate Certificate: Play and Expressive Therapies

The Graduate Certificate in Play and Expressive Therapies is an eighteen-credit program and provides the 150-course-hour requirement. Additionally, students in this program work toward acquiring the necessary 500 hours of experiential practice in play therapy and fifty hours of supervision, as required by the Association for Play Therapy (APT), Inc., for the Registered Play Therapist (RPT) certification.

Graduate Certificate: Clinical Social Work Licensure

The Graduate Certificate for Clinical Social Work Licensure is an 18-credit program designed for students that have completed a Master in Social Work (MSW) from a Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) accredited program, but need additional clinical course work to complete the educational requirements of the State of New Jersey to become a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW). Students must have a completed MSW degree and be a Licensed Social Worker (LSW) for admission to the certificate program.

Addiction Professionals Certification Board of New Jersey, Inc.

Since the fall of 2000, the School of Social Work at Monmouth University, in cooperation with the Addiction Professionals Certification Board of New Jersey, Inc., has offered the course work needed for the Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) certification. In the summer of 2004, the certification became a license. The Department of Social Work continues to work with the State of New Jersey, Department of Law and Public Safety, Division of Consumer Affairs, Board of Marriage and Family Therapists, Drug and Alcohol Committee to provide the course work needed for the state-issued Licensed Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LCADC).

The School of Social Work recognizes the need for addictions training to serve the substance abuse-affected population and their families. In order to serve this special population, the State Board requires that proper certifications be in place or in process.

Any M.S.W. student (in the C.P.F.C. concentration) who takes the elective course SW-604 Clinical Practice in Addictions (3 cr.) and a one-credit course that are offered each year here at Monmouth University will have completed the necessary course work towards his or her LCADC. Students who are completing their internship hours in a drug and alcohol placement may count those hours toward the required field hours for the LCADC as well as their M.S.W. degree. The course work and field hours are good for five years after they have been taken, and students are required to keep their own records. All other requirements towards the LCADC will need to be met by the student on his or her own, according to the State of New Jersey, Department of Law and Public Safety, Division of Consumer Affairs, Board of Marriage and Family Therapists, Drug and Alcohol Committee. For additional information regarding the requirements for the LCADC, please contact:

State Board of Marriage and Family Therapy Examiners
Alcohol and Drug Counselor Committee
PO Box 45040
124 Halsey Street, 12th Floor
Newark, NJ 07101
973-504-6582

Michael Cronin, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). M.S.W., Columbia University; Ph.D., Yeshiva University. Research interests in areas of international social work, healthcare and social policy, disaster management, social gerontology, and cultural competence.
mcronin@monmouth.edu

Ralph Cuseglio, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). M.S.W., D.S.W., Rutgers University. Areas of interest include school social work, clinical social work, and psychotherapy.
rcusegli@monmouth.edu

Anne Deepak, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). B.A., Boston University; M.S., Ph.D., Columbia University. Areas of research interest are in the delivery of diversity and social justice content in social work education, the application of postcolonial feminist social work perspective to global social problems, and the dynamics of Global North-South partnerships.
adeepak@monmouth.edu

Jeanne Koller, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). B.B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.S.W., Hunter College of Social Work; Ph.D., Rutgers University.
jkoller@monmouth.edu

Robin Mama, Professor (Graduate Faculty).
Dean, School of Social Work. B.S.W., College of Misericordia; M.S.S., Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College. Areas of interest include occupational safety and health, field education, and culturally competent social work practice. Current research projects include international social work and human rights.
rmama@monmouth.edu

Golam M. Mathbor, Professor (Graduate Faculty). B.S.S., M.S.S., Bachelor of Law (LLB), University of Dhaka, Bangladesh; M.S.W., McGill University; Ph.D., University of Calgary. Areas of interest include development and analysis of social policies and services, community organizing and social action, social planning, community development and community participation, and international social work. Current research interests include sustainable development of coastal communities, international development, and multicultural social work.
gmathbor@monmouth.edu

Paul Urbanski, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). B.F.A., University of Michigan; M.S.W., Columbina University; Ph.D., University of Albany, New York. Research interests include the impact of institutional settings on older adults and specifically on resident autonomy in long-term care facilities. Currently, he is interested in understanding the experiences of older adult Korean emigrants who have come to the U.S. as family caregivers.
purbansk@monmouth.edu

Joelle Zabotka, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). B.A., Drew University; M.S.W., Columbia University; Ph.D., Rutgers University. Social work clinician who continues to practice, with research interests in child mental health and development, parenting, substance abuse, and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.
jzapotka@monmouth.edu

Course usage information

SW-LPE   Social Work Project ExpositionCredits: None   

Prerequisite(s): SW-780

Course Type(s): OL

Social Work Project Defense. This is a pass/fail course.

Course usage information

SW-503   Social Work Practice with Individuals and FamiliesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

This beginning practice course introduces students to the basic processes of social work and the roles and skills needed for foundation practice. Relevant theories of social work practice with individuals and families are explored in relation to interviewing skills and assessment strategies. The course integrates ethical/value standards, multicultural and diverse contexts, and populations at risk. Effective practice methods, ethical issues, and the problem-solving process are incorporated. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in this course or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-505   Social Welfare Policy and Services ICredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The first of two required courses in social policy defines social policy; examines the social, economic; and political circumstances that give rise to social problems and their policy solutions; explores frameworks for analyzing these solutions; and reviews a history of the profession of social work.

Course usage information

SW-507   Social Work ResearchCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Develops the student's ability to use and engage in both quantitative and qualitative research in order to inform and evaluate his or her own social practice. Addresses key research concepts and procedures, such as hypothesis formulation, measurement, sampling, research design, and data collection.

Course usage information

SW-509   Human Behavior in the Social EnvironmentCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HY

This is a course which students use theory and empirical data to assess human behavior as it develops in a variety of sociopolitical environments at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. A strengths-based, empowerment-focused paradigm is introduced to help students conceptualize biological, psychological, cognitive, and social factors as they influence human growth and development.

Course usage information

SW-510   Field Practicum ICredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

This is the first part of a yearlong seminar required of all first-year MSW students completing a field internship. The purpose of the seminar is to integrate experiences from the field with course work, discussion, and personal reflections. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in this course or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-513   Social Work Practice in GroupsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Builds on social work practice, knowledge, skills and techniques. Describes social work practice with groups. It begins by delving into the history of group work in social work practice. Essentially, the course will explain the stages of group development, as well as concepts and theories related to group work treatment. In addition, different styles of group leadership will be presented, as well as group member roles. Students will be expected to role-play various stages of group development. Group process will also incorporate an ecosystems perspective, with overall emphasis on empowerment utilizing a strengths perspective. Special attention will be given to human rights, social and economic justice, diversity and cultural issues with respect to social work practice with groups. Students must earn a grade of "B or higher or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-515   Social Welfare Policy and ServicesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HY

This course examines the various forces that shape current social welfare policies in the United States from historical context. It includes critical analysis around contemporary social welfare policy development globally and locally with an emphasis on the dimensions of social problem definition, policy analysis, social allocation, delivery system structure and funding allocation from a social work perspective. The reciprocal role of policy and practice around social work's values, professional ethics, skills, and interventions are addressed and utilized to advocate for the human rights, and social, economic, and environmental justice of vulnerable and oppressed populations.

Course usage information

SW-518   Global Community PracticeCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-509

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Required of all graduate Social Work majors, this course focuses on the community as the unit of intervention. Students will be introduced to the spectrum of macro social work practice from a global perspective. Students will learn the skills necessary for conceptualizing and facilitating social change, whether at the agency, neighborhood, state, federal or international level. Direct action (grassroots) organizing will be the framework for learning about social change. Examines international organizing movements and how these compare to organizing efforts in the United States. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in this course or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-519   Human Behavior in the Social Environment IICredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-509

Course Type(s): None

This is the second semester of a two-semester course sequence within which students use theory and empirical data to assess human behavior as it develops within a variety of sociopolitical environments. A strengths-based, empowerment- focused paradigm is developed to help students conceptualize the interactions among social identities, such as race, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation and gender expression, as they influence human behavior in larger sociopolitical entities, such as groups, organizations, and communities.

Course usage information

SW-520   Field Practicum IICredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-510 passed with a grade of B or higher

Co-requisite(s): SW-503, SW-513 and SW-518

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

The second part of a yearlong seminar required of all first-year MSW students completing a field internship. The seminar is generalist in focus. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in this course or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-598   Special Topics in Social WorkCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

The subject matter varies with the interest of the students and the professor teaching the course. The exact nature of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in the student's transcript. Permission of the department chair required to take this course. If a prerequisite is required it will be announced in the course schedule.

Course usage information

SW-599   Independent Study in Social WorkCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Reading and research under the direction of a member of the Social Work faculty. Prior permission of the directing professor and department chair is required to take this course.

Course usage information

SW-602   Domestic ViolenceCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Highlights the issues of power and control with respect to violence. The societal beliefs and mores of different cultures that condone violence will be examined. The patterns of domestic violence will be studied from the points-of-view of the victims as well as the abusers. Methods of social work practice with family violence as well as current treatment procedures with abusers and victims are included.

Course usage information

SW-603   Addictions ConsiderationsCredits: 1   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Deals with the practice of social work with substance abusing clients. It is meant to supplement material covered in SW -604 (Clinical Practice in Addictions) to fulfill the obligations of licensure from the state of New Jersey.

Course usage information

SW-604   Clinical Practice in AddictionsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Evaluates the clinical implications of substance use and abuse at three levels of social work practice. On the micro level, clinical implications including symptomatology, etiology, and physiology of substance use will be addressed. Assessment and treatment theory and techniques will be explored, implemented, and evaluated. On a mezzo level, the effects on, and needs of, the extended family and systemic community of those who use substances, will be addressed. Strategies for meeting those needs will be researched and evaluated. Lastly, on the macro level, existing resources available and active policy regarding substance abuse will be critically studied, and potential proposed changes will be discussed.

Course usage information

SW-605   Clinical Practice with Families and ChildrenCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, and SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Provides a historical perspective on family- centered practice. Introduces major theories and intervention types that are the foundation for clinical work with diverse families.

Course usage information

SW-611   Social Work Practice with ParentsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520, both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Introduces students to assessment and intervention with individuals/couples/groups who are in parenting roles. Parenting techniques from a strengths based perspective and introduced. This course is a continuation of the ecological perspective of systems theory and social work practice illustrated in Human Behavior and the Social Environment and Social Work Practice & Techniques. Ethnic, culture and gender issues are included in the course information as they apply. Family violence, parenting styles, parenting roles, substance abuse and adolescence conflict are among the topics discussed in this course.

Course usage information

SW-613   Social Work Leadership and ManagementCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519, and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Students will learn the basic principles and applied practice of management and leadership in nonprofit human service and nongovernmental organizations from a social work perspective grounded in social justice and human rights. A wide range of human services management competencies are studied in this class while identifying internal and external environments for human service organizations and non-governmental organizations. Also, this course will review various organizational theories; human resource management skills; finance resource management skills and knowledge; and other current concerns in human service management.

Course usage information

SW-614   Grant WritingCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): TPS

Provides students with the opportunity to develop grant writing skills, to apply for a grant for their field internship agency and to begin to learn about project management. Emphasis will be placed on writing skills, concept development, program development and budget preparation. This course is suitable for students in either concentration.

Course usage information

SW-615   Advanced Global and Community PracticeCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

This is the first course in the concentration on Global and Community Practice. It is designed to introduce the student to local and global social work practice, with a special emphasis on community development and community organizing. The historical and current political context of development, the policies and practices of international aid, humanitarian agencies, governments and multilateral organizations and the role of social work in addressing human rights and needs are critically examined. Emphasis is given to the impact of social welfare policy decisions upon oppressed population groups and the implications of these decisions for human rights and social and economic justice. The importance of engaging organizations, community groups and institutions and allies to work together to address problems or conditions they have identified and wish to solve or change will also be highlighted. The macro context of the relationship and tensions between Global North and Global South development and practice are explored, as is the impact of this context on global community practice. Knowledge, skills and awareness for community practice work in multicultural local, transnational, and global settings are emphasized in this course. Engagement of communities and organizations via social media campaigns and collaborative in-person activities are also highlighted. Students must earn a grade of "B" or higher in this class or it will have to be repeated and this may delay a student's ability to move forward in the program. Prerequisites: SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519, and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Course usage information

SW-616   Social Work Practice with the AgedCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Designed for students specializing in practice with the aged and their families. Examines normative and pathological aging personality. Emphasis is placed on the development of specialized knowledge and skills for assessment, intervention, and evaluation of a variety of issues and needs common in later life. Discussions on the applicability of certain interventions with the older adult and the family will be presented along with ethno-cultural and gender considerations.

Course usage information

SW-617   Environmental Justice and Sustainable Development in Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520, both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Addresses environmental crises and sustainable development challenges facing social workers in local and global arenas. Special attention will be made to conceptualize these challenges, themes and issues using a social justice and human rights framework embodied in Green Social Work. Social work pathways to facilitating environmental justice through local and global policy, coalitions and programming. Students must earn a "B" or higher in this class or it will have to be repeated and this may delay a student's ability to move forward in the program.

Course usage information

SW-619   Social Work SupervisionCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Familiarizes students with the basic concepts of supervision as a vital component of social work practice in three areas: practice skills, administrative needs and evaluation. Covers a historical and theoretical view of supervision, techniques, styles, supervise counter transference, authority, power and the supervision process. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of supervision, ethical and value principles, professional boundaries and supervision as a leadership function.

Course usage information

SW-621   Social Work with Military FamiliesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

This course is an MSW elective. It is designed to assist students in understanding military systems and cultures within the United States. Also, we will examine contemporary areas of practice for social workers within and outside of the military. Special attention will be given to the impacts of the current and historical conflicts on military personnel, their families, and veterans and also to the ethical issues of working with these populations.

Course usage information

SW-623   Social InnovationsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

The problems facing today's world - global poverty, disease, climate change - are more complex than ever before, and solutions require interdisciplinary thinking and cross-sector collaboration. Social innovation represents a new paradigm that supports the development, implementation, and sustainability of transformational responses to social needs. Social innovation focuses attention on the ideas and solutions that create social value - as the processes through which they are generated, not just on individuals and organizations. This course introduces students to the strategies and processes of social innovation and social change. Students will gain knowledge of strategies of change that include the innovative activities of social and political entrepreneurs, activists, organizations, and social movements. Students will examine several individuals and groups who have catalyzed important positive social change through different organizational platforms - in the market, in government, within the nonprofit sector, and increasingly in the space between these three sectors. Throughout the course students will examine social innovation through case studies, best practice analyses, and relevant readings.

Course usage information

SW-625   Program Planning and EvaluationCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Provides information about the techniques and procedures involved in the planning process and in the application of research methods to social work practice at the community level. Focus will be on the conceptualization of a social program and on process or planning and the outcome evaluation research. Different approaches to planning and evaluation from a strengths-based empowerment perspective will be surveyed. Students will deal with the theoretical and practical problems of planning and evaluating social welfare programs and services for individuals and families in a global context.

Course usage information

SW-626   Evaluation of Practice EffectivenessCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518 and SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Provides information about the values, techniques and procedures involved in the application of research methods to social services and programming. The focus will be on the conceptualization of a social program and on process and outcome evaluation research. Students will deal with the theoretical and practical problems of evaluating social work and social welfare programs and services.

Course usage information

SW-627   Implications of Social Justice and Human Rights for Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

First of a two-course sequence examining the implications and applications of social justice and human rights within social work. Within this course, students develop their knowledge of social justice and human rights principles and theories. Students analyze the implications of those principles and theories for the profession of social work as they develop a proposal for the implementation of social justice and human rights in either an agency-based, creative, or research-focused project.

Course usage information

SW-628   School Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-510, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, and SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Designed for students in the MSW program who are either in a school social work field internship, who currently work in the school system, or who anticipate becoming a school social worker in the future. Provides a conceptual framework for understanding social work services in schools. It will also cover educational policy, pupil rights, and the current social issues that school personnel handle.

Course usage information

SW-629   Spirituality and Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Provides a forum in which students will explore spirituality in social work practice. Through a critically reflective approach, this course prepares students to respond competently and ethically to diverse spiritual perspectives in relation to themselves, their clients and the helping relationships they create with them.

Course usage information

SW-630   Field Practicum III FCCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Required for advanced-standing students and those in the second year of the MSW program in the CPFC concentration. Focuses on advanced skills and particular techniques used with vulnerable and oppressed populations at each stage of the direct practice helping process and with difficult practice situations, such as resistant and involuntary clients, divorced families, child abuse and neglect, and other serious social problems affecting individuals, client groups, dyads, and family systems. Case examples representing complex client situations are drawn from the populations served by students in their fieldwork placements with a specific emphasis placed on working from a social justice and human rights perspective in the field. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in this course or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-631   Field Practicum III CICredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-515, SW-518, and SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

The semester is spent examining issues and methods in international and community practice. Some time will be spent considering an internship overseas in the spring semester. To this end, the course will expose all students to issues in living and working overseas and on cross-cultural understanding. Special attention is given to strategies that specifically target human rights issues, both in the United States and abroad. Designed to relate specifically to students completing their third semester of field practicum in a macro setting. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in this course or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-632   Crisis InterventionCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Course Type(s): None

Examines the multiple definitions, concepts, and models of crisis intervention. Addresses the issue of scope and timing of services. Additionally, the issue of categories of events (private vs. public) will be discussed. The education and training of the crisis intervention specialist will also be explored. The effect of a crisis on the individual, the family and the community is considered. Sociocultural factors will also be considered also.

Course usage information

SW-635   Suicide Prevention and InterventionCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Designed to provide the student with an introduction to the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary for the understanding of and working in clinical practice with individuals at risk for suicidal thoughts, attempts, and completions. Myths and facts of suicide will be reviewed along with providing information on the state of the evidence base for epidemiology, risk factors, prevention, intervention and postvention with the school-aged child and adolescent, elderly, and special high-risk populations such as Native Americans. Open only to MSW students. Students from other majors must get permission of the professor to enroll.

Course usage information

SW-640   Field Practicum IV FCCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-630 passed with a grade of B or higher

Co-requisite(s): SW-605, SW-645, and SW-665

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

This second course in advanced fieldwork practice focuses on the application of social justice and human rights in practice with individuals, families and groups. It will focus on how culture and the global environment influence assessment and intervention. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in this course or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-641   Field Practicum IV CICredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-631 passed with a grade of B or higher

Co-requisite(s): SW-615 and SW-617

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Designed to relate specifically to students completing their fourth semester of field practicum in a macro setting. Students are completing 250 hours of fieldwork during this semester while taking this class. It will covers a topic of current interest in social work: cultural competency in the organization and best practice content and readings related to each student's specific field internship. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in this course or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-642   Empowering Adults with Acute Stress and TraumaCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-510 passed with a grade of B or higher, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519, and SW-520 passed with a grade of B or higher.

Course Type(s): None

Empowering Adults with Acute Stress and Trauma is an elective course for students in the advanced year of the MSW program. The course examines the variant experiences of acute stress, crisis, and post crisis adults may face when exposed to trauma in their life. Specific common occurrences, as well as unique experiences of trauma from a Micro, Mezzo and Macro impact are included, with special emphasis on the interventions specific for their needs to best foster empowerment and wellness. This course is repeatable once for credit.

Course usage information

SW-645   Clinical Social Work Assessment Diagnosis and Intervention PlanningCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Addresses advanced assessment, diagnosis, and intervention planning with adults. Examines the use of advanced theory in understanding problem formulation, assessment, diagnosis, and intervention planning utilizing a clinical social work approach. Attention is directed to sociocultural factors, policy issues and global environment considerations that impact diagnosis and intervention with persons seeking clinical social work services. The impact of poverty, racism, sexism, homophobia and various manifestations of institutionalized oppression upon clients and clinicians is considered. Intervention methods that enhance adaptive functioning and resiliency are explored. Provides students with an understanding of social work values and ethics as directly related to clinical work, the relevance of critical thinking skills, and the importance of collaborative intervention planning and evaluation of treatment effectiveness. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in this course or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-654   Humanitarian Issues in War and Armed ConflictCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Challenges students to explore and discuss important questions around protecting the rights of vulnerable people during the times of war. International humanitarian law is a set of rules that seeks, for humanitarian reasons, to limit the effects of armed conflict. It protects persons who are not or are no longer participating in the hostilities and restricts the means and methods of warfare. International humanitarian law is also known as the law of war or the law of armed conflict. Only open to MSW students. Students from other majors must get permission of the professor to enroll.

Course usage information

SW-665   Advanced Clinical Practice with ChildrenCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Builds upon the foundation of individual, family and group work, with advanced practice applications for social work with children. Assessment and intervention skills used with children and adolescents are taught in relation to special issues that impact upon children today nationally and internationally. Students must earn a grade of B or higher in this course or it will have to be repeated.

Course usage information

SW-669   Applications of Social Justice and Human Rights in Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519, and SW-627; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Course Type(s): None

Second of a two-course sequence examining the implications and applications of social justice and human rights within social work. Guides students in the practice and application of social justice and human rights theories within their concentration-specific engagement with social work. Students undertake the implementation of a project that advances social justice and human rights as appropriate to their concentration area and practice interests.

Course usage information

SW-672   Advanced Theory in Play TherapyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): OL

Provides an in-depth understanding of the history and theories of play therapy. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the roles of therapists and parents through the play process. Diversity and multicultural considerations for theoretical perspectives are highlighted. Also listed as EDC-672 and PC-672.

Course usage information

SW-673   Advanced Techniques in Play TherapyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HY

Provides students with the opportunity to develop techniques and methods of play therapy. Emphasis is placed on working with children, adolescents, and adults through individual, group, and family play therapy. Major topics include group play therapy, family play therapy, short-term play therapy, and sand tray/sand play therapy. Additionally, diversity and multicultural considerations are highlighted. Also listed as EDC-673 and PC-673.

Course usage information

SW-674   Play Therapy for Children at RiskCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): OL

Focus is on play therapy with vulnerable and high-risk children. Emphasis on working with children, adolescents, and adults using play therapy in trauma and crisis situations is highlighted. Special attention is given to social issues that can lead to or exacerbate trauma or crisis. Also listed as EDC-674 and PC-674.

Course usage information

SW-698   Special Topics in Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The subject matter varies with the interest of the students and the professor teaching the course. The exact nature of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in the student's transcript. Permission of the program director is required.

Course usage information

SW-699   Independent Study in Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-503, SW-505, SW-507, SW-509, SW-513, SW-515, SW-518, SW-519; and SW-510 and SW-520 both passed with a grade of B or higher

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Reading and research leading to significant written work under the direction of a member of the social work faculty. Prior permission of the directing professor and department chair is required to take this course.

Course usage information

SW-710   Intersecting Ethics of Social Work, Leadership, Scholarship, and Human RightsCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

In this course, we will review the spiritual, philosophical, and historical foundations of modern ethics. This will include gaining insight into how ethics are reflected in social work values and principles that guide practice behaviors. We will examine the intersection between ethics and the mission of social work to address social justice and human rights for vulnerable populations. Over the course of semester various lenses will be used to examine how ethics translate into practice behaviors. Leadership will be explored as an expression of ethics, considering dilemmas that may exist between the mission of service providers and the environmental, economic, and social context within which agencies provide services to individuals and communities. We will examine how ethics influence our response to various social issues such as global climate change and experiences related to gender identity, race/ethnicity, spirituality, and culture. We will conclude the course by exploring ethical dilemmas associated with service provision and methods for evaluating and responding to these dilemmas.

Course usage information

SW-715   Herstory and the Evolution of Social Work's Contributions to Leadership and Human RightsCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

The aim of this course is to provide a foundation on the history of social work, social work education and human rights along with current illustrations of human rights leadership in the social work profession. The frameworks of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Global Agenda are used to support progress toward just policies and practices. This course will prepare students with a foundation of knowledge and tools to critically assess and envision human rights leadership in the social work profession, social welfare policies, human service organizations, and the outcomes of social work delivery systems. As the name, "Herstory," suggests, this class will be taught through the lens of anti-racism, intersectional feminism, and global justice. Students will examine the tensions, achievements and possibilities within the profession including professionalization, the micro-macro divide, and practices of racism and anti-racism.

Course usage information

SW-720   Social Work Leadership Portfolio DevelopmentCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

This course is designed to provide students with structured support, guidance, and feedback as they develop their DSW portfolio and begin the planning phase of their Capstone Project. Students will learn to write a human rights focused case study and be able to frame it within the context of a literature review. The course will also assist students in narrowing the scope of their DSW research interests and will engage them in the process of thinking critically about how it can lead to eventual actionable change. In doing so, the course will introduce and explore how digital forms of advocacy and activism have been utilized to influence political and social change. Students will then learn the foundational skills that are necessary to effectively use digital technology and social media for this purpose. Students will later apply these skills in their Capstone Project to inform, educate, and engage a public audience on a human rights issue specific to their area of social work practice that requires attention and/or change.

Course usage information

SW-725   Leadership Portfolio Development and Strategic Planning for Career TrajectoryCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

This course introduces leadership by focusing on the practice of leadership at the micro and mezzo levels. Attention is given to helping students understand and improve their own leadership performance as they begin to build a portfolio and develop a vision and strategic plan for career trajectory.

Course usage information

SW-730   Comparative Theories and Practices of Leadership and Human RightsCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

The aim of this course is to introduce students to advanced theories and practices of leadership using the framework of universal declaration human rights in developing social development perspectives across the disciplines. This course will address the contemporary, philosophical, and theoretical underpinnings of leadership, human rights, and social, economic, and environmental justice. More specifically, it will examine various leadership models and strategies in advanced human rights issues to ensure social, economic, and environmental justice. The course will not only prepare students to acquire the necessary knowledge base but will also teach students the skills to become advocates for the vulnerable constituents of our global population.

Course usage information

SW-735   Theories in Social Innovation and ChangeCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

This course is grounded in foundation social work courses and is designed to build on and apply previous course knowledge with a special emphasis on socially innovative program and community development utilizing a design thinking approach.

Course usage information

SW-740   Social Justice Approaches to Executive Leadership and Strategic ManagementCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

This course focuses on questions of mission and vision ("What areas should an organization be working in and what should the organization's future look like?) and on questions of strategy and operations ("How can we perform effectively and how do we measure and define success?"). The course will cover key skill areas such as mission statements, creating organizational goals, assessment of outcomes, strategic planning, building boards and committees, along with an overview of fundraising skills.

Course usage information

SW-745   Quantitative Research Methods and AnalysisCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

In this course, will present quantitative research methods in the context of human rights and rigorous ethical standards. Students will review quantitative research methods and design allowing the social work practitioner to be able to discern and design quality research encompassing strong internal, external and measurement validity. A range of quantitative techniques will be presented leading to the development of a research proposal that addresses issues common to social work leadership.

Course usage information

SW-750   Qualitative ResearchCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

This course provides a review the various methods associated with qualitative research. This course will also provide an examination of the philosophical, epistemological, and methodological foundations that currently define qualitative research. Examples of qualitative methods in practice will be provided with a focus on how a method is determined and developed by a given research question.

Course usage information

SW-755   Educational Leadership in Human Rights Tool ICredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

The aim of this course is to further students knowledge of education leadership, continuing to use the overarching framework of advancing human rights and advocating for social, economic, and environmental justice. This course is one of a pair of courses for students wanting to use education as a leadership tool, and it is offered in the third and final year of the DSW program. Placement of this pair of courses coincides with students' preparation and implementation of their transformative human rights leadership project. Students must take this course prior to taking its sequel Education Leadership in Human Rights Tool II.

Course usage information

SW-760   Education Leadership in Human Rights Tool IICredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

The aim of this course is to further students' knowledge of education leadership, continuing to use the overarching framework of advancing human rights and advocating for social, economic, and environmental justice. This course is the second of a pair of courses for students wanting to use education as a leadership tool, and it is offered in the third and final year of the DSW program. Placement of this pair of courses coincides with students' preparation and implementation of their transformative human rights leadership project. Tool II provides students with an opportunity for experiential learning through completing a teaching practicum and aims to deepen students' understanding of global issues in educational leadership.

Course usage information

SW-765   Policy Leadership in Human Rights Tool ICredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

This course will address the contemporary, philosophical, and theoretical underpinnings of leadership in policy development from a human rights lens to ensure social, economic, and environmental justice. There will be a special emphasis on knowledge of the policy process, with skills focusing on policy analysis, policy development and implementation. This course is one of a pair of courses on the use of policy as a human rights leadership tool, offered in the third and final year of the DSW program. Students must take this course prior to taking its sequel, Policy Leadership in Human Rights Tool II.

Course usage information

SW-770   Policy Leadership in Human Rights Tool IICredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

This course provides opportunities for experiential learning through the completion of policy advocacy work in the student's community/workplace. Throughout the course, there will be an emphasis on the impact of values and professional ethics on policy analysis and program planning and development. Emphasis is given to the impact of social welfare policy decisions upon oppressed groups including their implications for human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

Course usage information

SW-775   Mentored Preparation of Transformative Human Rights Leadership Project ICredits: 3   

Course Type(s): OL

Similar to a dissertation, the capstone provides students with a guided opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and understanding they have acquired throughout their course of study. Students are expected to identify a problem of importance connected to the Sustainable Development Goals and develop an innovative proposal for an immediately actionable social change effort. Students will work in close consultation with their doctoral committee to build upon the research question. They will gain institutional approval to conduct their independent research and will conduct the research under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Students will present the findings develop of a multimedia project that presents applied knowledge relevant to the social work profession. This course runs over two semesters.

Course usage information

SW-780   Mentored Preparation of Transformative Human Rights Leadership Project IICredits: 3   

Prerequisite(s): SW-775

Course Type(s): OL

Similar to a dissertation, the capstone provides students with a guided opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and understanding they have acquired throughout their course of study. Students are expected to identify a problem of importance connected to the Sustainable Development Goals and develop an innovative proposal for an immediately actionable social change effort. Students will work in close consultation with their doctoral committee to build upon the research question. They will gain institutional approval to conduct their independent research and will conduct the research under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Students will present the findings develop of a multimedia project that presents applied knowledge relevant to the social work profession. This course is the second in a two-semester course.

Course usage information

SW-798   Special Topics in Social WorkCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

The subject matter varies with the interest of the students and the professor teaching the course. The exact nature of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in the student's transcript. Permission of the department chair required to take this course. If a prerequisite is required it will be announced in the course schedule.