Chemistry and Physics

Chair: William Schreiber, Department of Chemistry and Physics

Our curricula provide foundations in the traditional chemistry sub-disciplines. The programs serve as excellent preparation for further professional study in chemistry and related sciences, health professions such as medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and physical therapy. Careers in academia, the chemical and pharmaceutical industries, environmental protection, forensics, government, industrial hygiene, information science, patent law, science writing, toxicology, and education are open to those whose initial field of study is chemistry.

The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry provides a core curriculum of chemistry while allowing sufficient flexibility to combine it with a second major, a minor, or elective biology courses for pre-medical studies, within the total of 128 credits required for graduation. Completion of the Chemistry and Education curriculum qualifies graduates to apply for Secondary Education endorsement as a chemistry teacher. Completion of two additional courses provides eligibility for physical science certification, which is required for teaching chemistry or physics at the high school level.

The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with a concentration in Advanced Chemistry provides a strong foundation in all five of the chemistry sub-disciplines. Students planning to pursue graduate study in chemistry or to seek employment in chemistry-related positions should follow this program, which leads to a degree certified by the American Chemical Society.

The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with a concentration in Biochemistry includes an introduction to the traditional subject areas of biology as well as specific biochemistry courses. This program is appropriate for students planning to seek employment or pursue graduate study in biochemistry, or attend medical or other health professional schooling. American Chemical Society certification may be achieved in this concentration by appropriate choice of electives.

The concentration in Chemical Physics prepares students interested in graduate work in areas such as nanotechnology and materials science, which are at the interface of chemistry and physics.

The Chemistry faculty are engaged in research in many interesting areas.  Providing opportunities for student participation in these efforts is an important priority for the department.

Departmental Honors can be earned in Chemistry if the following criteria are met:

  • An overall GPA of 3.3 or higher;
  • A major GPA of 3.5 or higher;
  • At least three credits of research;
  • Completion of both Physical Chemistry I and II along with their associated laboratory courses;
  • Completion of a thesis with a grade of “B” or higher;
  • Public presentation of research.

Steven Bachrach, Professor.
Dean, School of Science. BS, University of Illinois; PhD, University of California, Berkeley. Research areas are theoretical organic chemistry, electron density analysis, theoretical determination of reaction mechanisms, and development of Internet resources for chemists.
sbachrac@monmouth.edu

Nikita Burrows, Assistant Professor. BS, The College/University of the Bahamas; MS, PhD, Georgia State University. Research interest is chemical education.
nburrows@monmouth.edu

Azzam Elayan, Lecturer. PhD, Wesleyan University. Organometallic chemistry. Mechanisms of metal-catalyzed processes, particularly those involving carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.
aelayan@monmouth.edu

Davis Jose, Assistant Professor. BS, MS, Mahatma Gandhi University, India; PhD, Max-Plank Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Germany. Research interest is biological chemistry.
djose@monmouth.edu

Dmytro Kosenkov, Assistant Professor. BS, MS, National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv; PhD, Jackson State University. Research interests are investigation of energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes to design new types of solar cells, modeling light-sensitive proteins for non-invasive control of neurons; speeding up computational chemistry using graphics processing units (GPUs).
dkosenko@monmouth.edu

Robin Kucharczyk, Lecturer. BA, Douglass College, Rutgers University; PhD, Yale University. Inorganic chemistry.
rkucharc@monmouth.edu

Massimiliano Lamberto, Associate Professor. BS, MS, University of Messina, Italy; PhD, University of Southampton (UK). Organic chemistry. Research interests: small molecule synthesis for the inhibition of telomerase by G-quadruplex DNA stabilization; synthesis of novel chromophoric systems for dye-sensitized solar cells and sensor applications; synthetic methodology.
mlambert@monmouth.edu

Kayla Lewis, Assistant Professor. PhD, Georgia Institute of Technology. Geophysics. Research interests are computer modeling of processes associated with climate change.
klewis@monmouth.edu

Gregory Moehring, Associate Professor. PhD, Purdue University. Research interests are synthesis and NMR characterizaton of transition metal polyhydride compounds; transformations of small molecules at transition meal polyhydride compounds.
gmoehrin@monmouth.edu

Datta V. Naik, Professor. BSc, St. Xavier's College, University of Bombay, Goa, India; PhD, University of Notre Dame Analytical inorganic chemistry.
dnaik@monmouth.edu

Jonathan Ouellet, Assistant Professor. PhD, University of Sherbrooke. Research interests are nucleic acid structure and folding dynamics.
jouellet@monmouth.edu

William Schreiber, Lecturer, Chair, and Coordinator, Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Medical Laboratory Science Programs. BS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; PhD, University of Rochester. Organic chemistry. Organic synthesis, process research, and chemical education.
wschreib@monmouth.edu

Danuta Szwajkajzer, Lecturer. MS, Technical University of Warsaw; MS, University of Rochester; PhD, Rutgers University. Biophysical chemistry. Chemistry of proteins and nucleic acids, thermodynamics of drug binding to DNA.
dszwajka@monmouth.edu

Tsanangurayi Tongesayi, Associate Professor. BS, MS, University of Zimbabwe; PhD, West Virginia University. Analytical chemistry. Research interests are speciation, geochemical cycling, bioavailability of heavy metals in the environment, technologies and methods for the removal of toxic heavy metals and their compounds from drinking water, and analytical method development.
ttongesa@monmouth.edu

Course usage information

CE-101   Chemistry in Our LivesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

Major concepts and methodologies in chemistry and their relation to specific, important issues in today's society.

Course usage information

CE-109   Introduction to General, Organic, and BiochemistryCredits: 4   

Prerequisite: High School Chemistry.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Structure of matter, the mole concept, chemical bonds and reactions, acids and bases, structure and reactions of organic compounds, chemistry and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Three hours of class, three hours of lab per week.

Course usage information

CE-111   General Chemistry ICredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Score of 2 or higher on the Mathematics Placement Exam or MA-050 passed with a minimum grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: CE-111L.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

The first of two lecture courses which, taken together, provide a preparation for subsequent courses in chemistry. Principles and theories of chemical problem solving, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, states of matter, periodic properties of the elements, atomic and molecular structure, introductory quantum mechanics, thermochemistry, and the properties of gases are covered.

Course usage information

CE-111L   General Chemistry Laboratory ICredits: 1   

Corequisite: CE-111.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Laboratory work to complement the class work of Chemistry 111 and 112; review of mathematical fundamentals; experiments involving observation and interpretation of chemical and physical changes; experimental studies of gas laws, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, qualitative analysis, and molecular mass determination. Three hours per week.

Course usage information

CE-112   General Chemistry IICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: CE-111, CE-111L, and a score of 3 or higher on the Mathematics Placement Exam or MA-101, MA-105 or MA-109 or MA-115; all passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: CE-112L.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

The second of two lecture courses which, taken together, provide preparation for subsequent courses in chemistry. Properties of liquids and solutions, chemical kinetics and equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry.

Course usage information

CE-112L   General Chemistry Laboratory IICredits: 1   

Corequisite: CE-112.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Laboratory work to complement the class work of Chemistry 111 and 112; review of mathematical fundamentals; experiments involving observation and interpretation of chemical and physical changes; experimental studies of gas laws, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, qualitative analysis, and molecular mass determination. Three hours per week.

Course usage information

CE-198   Special Topics in Chemistry (100 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in chemistry to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

CE-220   Environmental ChemistryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: CE-112 and CE-112L, both passed with a minimum grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: CE-220L.

Course Type(s): MEBP

Soil, aquatic, and atmospheric chemistry; environmental analytical chemistry; connections to environmental biology. Sources, reactions, mobility, effects, and fates of chemical species in the soil, water and air environments and the effect of human activity on these. Gives the theoretical principles and techniques of both classical and instrumental methods of chemical analysis.

Course usage information

CE-220L   Environmental Chemistry LaboratoryCredits: 1   

Corequisite: CE-220.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MEBP

Soil, aquatic and atmospheric chemistry; environmental analytical chemistry; connections to environmental biology. Sources, reactions, mobility, effects and fates of chemical species in the soil, water and air environments and the effect of human activity on these. Laboratory experiments and field trips will be used to address the needs for this course. Students will gain hands-on experience in both classical and instrumental methods of chemical analysis.

Course usage information

CE-221   Quantitative AnalysisCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: CE-112 and CE-112L, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: CE-221L.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Theoretical principles and techniques of volumetric, gravimetric, and potentiometric methods of analysis; treatment of analytical data, equilibria involving acid-base, redox, complexometric, and precipitation reactions.

Course usage information

CE-221L   Quantitative Analysis LaboratoryCredits: 2   

Corequisite: CE-221.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Laboratory techniques, procedures, and practice in quantitative analysis of selected substances by volumetric, gravimetric, and potentiometric methods. Six hours per week.

Course usage information

CE-225   Bioanalytical ChemistryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-110, CE-112, and CE-112L, all passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: CE-225L.

Course Type(s): None

Introduces fundamentals of analytical chemistry and modern methods of instrumental analysis in the context of biochemical concepts. Topics include statistical treatment of data, acid-base chemistry, spectrophotometry, chromatography, electrophoresis, biological mass spectrometry, proteomics/protein identification, immunochemistry, and electrochemical methods.

Course usage information

CE-225L   Bioanalytical Chemistry LaboratoryCredits: 1   

Prerequisites: CE-112, CE-112L, and BY-110 all with a minimum grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: CE-225.

Course Type(s): WT

Introduces analytical laboratory techniques in the context of biochemistry and will cover topics that include statistical treatment of data, acid-base chemistry, spectrophotometry, chromatography, electrophoresis, biological mass spectrometry, proteomics/protein identification, immunochemistry, and electrochemical methods. Laboratory experiments and an independent research project will be used to address the needs for this course. Students will gain "hands-on" experience in classical and instrumental methods of biochemical analysis.

Course usage information

CE-241   Organic Chemistry ICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: CE-112 and CE-112L, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: CE-241L.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Preparations and reactions of major classes of organic compounds with extensive discussion of reaction mechanisms and stereo-chemistry; interpretation of mass, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.

Course usage information

CE-241L   Organic Chemistry Laboratory ICredits: 2   

Corequisite: CE-241.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Laboratory work demonstrating the basic techniques of organic chemistry; qualitative organic analysis; and use of the gas chromatograph and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers to solve problems. Six hours per week.

Course usage information

CE-242   Organic Chemistry IICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: CE-241 and CE-241L, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Preparations and reactions of major classes of organic compounds with extensive discussion of reaction mechanisms and stereo-chemistry; interpretation of mass, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.

Course usage information

CE-242L   Organic Chemistry Laboratory IICredits: 2   

Prerequisite: CE-241L.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Laboratory work demonstrating the basic techniques of organic chemistry; qualitative organic analysis; and use of the gas chromatograph and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers to solve problems. Six hours per week.

Course usage information

CE-298   Special Topics in Chemistry (200 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: Chemistry CE-111, CE-111L, CE-112, CE-112L and others, as announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in chemistry to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted in a lecture, seminar or laboratory format.

Course usage information

CE-299   Independent Study in ChemistryCredits: 1-3   

Course Type(s): None

Original research work planned and carried out with the assistance of a faculty research advisor. The number of course credits will be arranged with the advisor. Three hours per credit.

Course usage information

CE-311   Chemical LiteratureCredits: 1   

Prerequisite: CE-241.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

A study of the literature of chemistry and the techniques of making source searches; extensive use is made of the library.

Course usage information

CE-322   Instrumental AnalysisCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: CE-221 and CE-221L, MA-126, and PH-212 and PH-212L, all passed with a grade of C- or higher; and EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisite: CE-322L.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): WT

Basic components of instruments and their arrangements; fundamental principles, applications, and limitations of instrumental methods of chemical analysis; spectroscopic methods (UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared, Raman, Fluorescence, Phosphorescence, Atomic absorption, Atomic emission, and Mass spectrometry); electrochemical methods (Potentiometry and Voltammetry); separation methods (High Performance liquid chromatography, Gas chromatography, and Capillary Electrophoresis).

Course usage information

CE-322L   Instrumental Analysis LaboratoryCredits: 1   

Corequisite: CE-322.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Basic components of instruments and their arrangements; fundamental principles, applications and limitations of instrumental methods of chemical analysis; spectroscopic methods (UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared, Fluorescence, Atomic absorption and Atomic emission); electrochemical methods (Potentiometry and Voltammetry); separation methods (High Performance liquid chromatography, Gas chromatography - Mass spectrometry). Laboratory experiments and an independent research project will be used to address the needs of this course. Students will gain hands-on experience in instrumental methods of chemical analysis for both qualitative and quantitative work.

Course usage information

CE-325   NMR SpectroscopyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: CE-242L.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

A treatment of the theories and applications of modern Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy. Applications of FT-NMR spectroscopy to the investigation and solution of chemical problems will be emphasized.

Course usage information

CE-331   Biochemistry ICredits: 3   

Prerequisite: CE-242.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

An introduction to biochemistry with a molecular biology and chemistry focus. It is centered on the relationships between structure and function of biological molecules such as proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids and their chemistry in living systems. It also includes the principle of bioenergetics, metabolic pathways, protein-ligand interactions and enzyme kinetics.

Course usage information

CE-331L   Biochemistry I LaboratoryCredits: 1   

Corequisite: CE-331.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Provides training in modern biochemical techniques, using proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids.

Course usage information

CE-332   Biochemistry IICredits: 3   

Prerequisite: CE-331.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

A continuation of Biochemistry 1 (CE-331). Focus will be on metabolism, biological oxidation and reduction processes, and biosynthetic pathways in the cell. Also covers molecular aspects of DNA replication, transcription, and protein translation, and molecular basis of genetic regulation. In addition, some diseases related to defects in these metabolic pathways will be discussed.

Course usage information

CE-341   Physical Chemistry ICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: MA-126 and PH-212, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: CE-341L.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Basic principles of quantum mechanics essential for understanding of atomic and molecular spectroscopy are covered. The specific topics included: Quantum Mechanics: postulates and formulation of Schrodinger equation, uncertainty principle, particle in a box, simple harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor, Hydrogen atom, hydrogenic wave functions, Pauli principle, Helium atom, Hydrogen molecule, Molecular Orbital Theory; Introduction and applications of Computational Chemistry; Spectroscopy; Light-matter interaction, term symbols, spectroscopic selection rules, electronic spectra of atoms and molecules, rotational and vibrational spectra, IR and Raman spectroscopy, Lasers.

Course usage information

CE-341L   Physical Chemistry I LaboratoryCredits: 1   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisite: CE-341.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): WT

This course is designed to be taken concurrently with CE-341, Physical Chemistry I. The experiments performed complement material studied in CE-341. Topics covered include: UV-Vis, FT-IR, Raman, Laser Induced Fluorescence, and Flash Photolysis spectroscopies. This laboratory also requires the use of modern computer platforms and quantum chemistry software for molecular simulations and data analysis.

Course usage information

CE-342   Physical Chemistry IICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: MA-126 and PH-212, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Amplification of concepts in thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and dynamics and application of these to gases, liquids, and solutions to provide a solid background for understanding the physical principles that govern behavior of chemical and biological systems. The specific topics included: Thermodynamics: standard functions (enthalpy, entropy, etc.), ensembles, partition function. Gibbs chemical potential, phase equilibria, electrochemical cells; Kinetic Theory of Gases: Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, collision frequency; effusion rate, heat capacity, transport processes (diffusion, viscosity, etc.); Chemical Kinetics: differential and integral expressions for rate laws, reaction mechanisms, Chemical Dynamics: collision theory, absolute rate theory, transition state theory.

Course usage information

CE-342L   Physical Chemistry II LaboratoryCredits: 1   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisite: CE-342.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): WT

This course is designed to be taken concurrently with CE-342, Physical Chemistry II. The experiments performed complement material studied in CE-342. Topics covered include experimental investigation of gas laws, phase transitions, transport properties of gases (diffusion), electrochemistry (electrolysis, electroplating, and voltammetry) and chemical kinetics (fluorescence quenching). This laboratory also requires the use of modern computer platforms and quantum chemistry software for simulations of chemical kinetics, dynamics and data analysis.

Course usage information

CE-350   Research in ChemistryCredits: 1-4   

Prerequisites: CE-221, CE-221L, CE-242, CE-242L, an overall GPA of 2.00, a minimum of fifteen credits completed at Monmouth University, and approval of the department.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX5

Original research work, associated with an external constituent and/or organization, planned and carried out with the assistance of a faculty research advisor. Research conducted by the students will be submitted for outside presentation, publication, or review. The number of course credits will be arranged with the advisor. Forty hours per term.

Course usage information

CE-388   Cooperative Education: ChemistryCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: CE-221, CE-221L, CE-242, and CE-242L; overall GPA of 2.00 minimum; fifteen credits completed at Monmouth University; and approval of the Department of Chemistry.

Course Type(s): EX2

Application of chemical concepts and skills learned in lecture and laboratory to work-related experiences. Students and faculty sponsors maintain journals of their cooperative education opportunities with the assistance of the Director of Cooperative Education. Students will work forty hours per credit per semester at their jobs. Students will maintain journals of their cooperative education experiences and write reports demonstrating how their experiences helped them achieve their learning goals. This is a pass/fail course.

Course usage information

CE-389   Internship in ChemistryCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: CE-221, CE-221L, CE-242, CE-242L; an overall GPA of 2.00 minimum; fifteen credits completed at Monmouth University; and approval by the Department of Chemistry.

Course Type(s): EX1

Provides an opportunity to apply chemical concepts and skills learned in lecture and laboratory to work-related experiences. Students and faculty sponsors will identify internship opportunities. Students will work forty hours per credit per semester in their internship positions. Students will maintain journals of their internship experiences and write reports demonstrating how their internship experiences helped them achieve the learning objectives identified at the start of the internships. This is a pass/fail course.

Course usage information

CE-398   Special Topics in Chemistry (300 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: CE-241, CE-241L, CE-242, CE-242L, or as announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in chemistry to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted in a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format.

Course usage information

CE-399   Independent Study in Chemistry (300 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Course Type(s): None

Original research work planned and carried out with the assistance of a faculty research advisor. The number of credits will be arranged with the advisor.

Course usage information

CE-401   Advanced Inorganic ChemistryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: CE-242 and CE-242L, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: CE-401L.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Modern theories of inorganic chemistry, including advanced considerations of atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, complex ions, solid state chemistry, magnetic properties of ions, periodicity, and contemporary problems.

Course usage information

CE-401L   Advanced Inorganic Chemistry LaboratoryCredits: 1   

Corequisite: CE-401.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Inorganic synthetic techniques, including inert atmosphere, high temperature, and non-aqueous solvents; methods of characterization of inorganic compounds, including use of spectroscopic and other instrumental methods. Three hours per week.

Course usage information

CE-405   Methods of Inorganic ChemistryCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: CE-401.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Coverage of important experimental methods in inorganic structural determinations. Topics include symmetry and group theory, computational methods, mass spectrometry, diffraction analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, rotational, Mossbauer, vibrational, electronic absorption, photoelectron spectroscopies. The application of these techniques to the characterization and determination of inorganic substances is the emphasis of the course.

Course usage information

CE-410   SeminarCredits: 1   

Prerequisite: CE-311.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): RD

Oral presentation of reports and discussion of current and review topics in chemistry.

Course usage information

CE-452   Advanced Organic ChemistryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: CE-242 and CE-242L, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Selected topics of modern, theoretical, organic chemistry.

Course usage information

CE-460   Electrochemical MethodsCredits: 3   

Corequisite: CE-341.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Theory and applications of electrochemical analysis: electrode processes, thermodynamics and kinetics of electrode reactions, controlled potential and controlled current microelectrode techniques, and bulk electrolysis.

Course usage information

CE-475   Computational Chemistry and Molecular ModelingCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: CE-341 and CE-341L, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Principal methods and techniques used to study organic molecules and biomolecules by computational methods. Interpretation of chemical data with the aid of a computer. Atomic and molecular orbitals, force fields, molecular dynamics, and molecular modeling and drug design.

Course usage information

CE-498   Special Topics in Chemistry (400 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: CE-242 or as announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in chemistry to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted in a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format.

Course usage information

CE-499   Independent Study in ChemistryCredits: 1-3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Original research work planned and carried out with the assistance of a faculty research advisor. The number of course credits will be arranged with the advisor. Three hours per credit.

Course usage information

ML-411   Clinical Internship in Medical Laboratory Science ICredits: 16   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EX1, WT

First half of an intensive one-year clinical internship and training at an approved, partner medical institution in the requisite skills for a career in medical laboratory science. Practical experience in tests and procedures of hematology, histology, blood bank, clinical microscopy, clinical chemistry, bacteriology, parasitology, mycology, immunology, serology, radioisotopes, and related subjects. Limited to Medical Laboratory Science majors who have completed all other degree requirements.

Course usage information

ML-412   Clinical Internship in Medical Laboratory Science IICredits: 16   

Prerequisite: ML-411.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EX1

Second half of an intensive one-year clinical internship and training at an approved, partner medical institution in the requisite skills for a career in medical laboratory science. Practical experience in tests and procedures of hematology, histology, blood bank, clinical microscopy, clinical chemistry, bacteriology, parasitology, mycology, immunology, serology, radioisotopes, and related subjects. Limited to Medical Laboratory Science majors who have completed all other requirements.

Course usage information

MM-490   Experience in Clinical MedicineCredits: 9   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EX5

Intensive, practical, first-hand experience in clinical medicine at Monmouth Medical Center. A comprehensive introduction to the skills required to practice medicine: excellent communication, critical reading of the literature, epidemiologic methods (disease patterns in populations), and understanding medicine as a human experience. The practicum consists of clinical observations, seminars, community service, discussion groups, and a research paper. This course is under the auspices of the Biology Department. Limited to Monmouth Medical Center Scholars with Junior standing. This is a pass/fail course.

Course usage information

PH-101   Physics in Our LivesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Presents major concepts and methodologies in physics and their importance in today's society. Introduction to principles of physics and their applications to today's technology using lectures and demonstration.

Course usage information

PH-103   The Physics of Sound and MusicCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

Presents the topics of sound and music from a physics point of view. Covered topics are harmonic motion, waves (both traveling and standing), the human voice and ear, the production of music and musical scales and the physics of several representative instruments.

Course usage information

PH-105   Physics for the Life Sciences ICredits: 3   

Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA-101, MA-105, MA-109, MA-115, or a higher-level mathematics course, all with a grade of C or higher.

Corequisite: PH-105L.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

An introduction to classical physics intended primarily for students majoring in the life sciences. Topics include: mechanics, dynamics, heat, electricity, magnetism, and optics.

Course usage information

PH-105L   Physics for the Life Sciences Laboratory ICredits: 1   

Corequisite: PH-105.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Laboratory work to complement PH-105. Experiments in the fields of statics, dynamics, energy, momentum, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and spectroscopy. Three hours per week.

Course usage information

PH-106   Physics for the Life Sciences IICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: PH-105 and PH-105L, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: PH-106L.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

An introduction to classical physics intended primarily for students majoring in the life sciences. Topics include, mechanics, dynamics, heat, electricity, magnetism, and optics.

Course usage information

PH-106L   Physics for the Life Sciences Laboratory IICredits: 1   

Corequisite: PH-106.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Laboratory work to complement PH-106. Experiments in the fields of sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and spectroscopy. Three hours per week.

Course usage information

PH-150   Principles of AstronomyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

The historical development of astronomy and the modern concepts of the universe, including demonstrations and viewing sessions with optical telescopes.

Course usage information

PH-198   Special Topics in Physics (100 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in physics to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

PH-211   General Physics with Calculus ICredits: 4   

Prerequisite: MA-125.

Corequisite: PH-211L.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): NS

The first of a two-semester sequence of courses that, taken together, provide a thorough introduction to classical physics using calculus. Topics covered include: one- and two-dimensional motion, Newton's laws and their applications, energy, momentum and impulse, rotational motion, gravitation, and thermodynamics.

Course usage information

PH-211L   General Physics with Calculus Laboratory ICredits: 1   

Corequisite: PH-211.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Laboratory experiments to complement the topics covered in PH-211. Includes experiments in statics, dynamics, and thermodynamics.

Course usage information

PH-212   General Physics with Calculus IICredits: 4   

Prerequisites: MA-126, PH-211 and PH-211L, all passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Corequisite: PH-212L.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): NS

The second of a two-semester sequence of courses that, taken together, provide a thorough introduction to classical physics using calculus. Topics covered include: sound and wave mechanics, electrostatics, circuits, magnetic forces and fields, Faraday's Law, reflection and refraction, and optics.

Course usage information

PH-212L   General Physics with Calculus Laboratory IICredits: 1   

Corequisite: PH-212.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Laboratory experiments to complement the topics covered in PH-211. Includes experiments in sound, electricity, magnetism, circuits, and optics.

Course usage information

PH-298   Special Topics in Physics (200 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in physics to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

PH-299   Independent Study in PhysicsCredits: 1-3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Guided study of a selected topic in physics not substantially treated in a regular course, under the direction of a member of the Physics faculty.

Course usage information

PH-301   Modern PhysicsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: PH-302 passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Topics from physics of the twentieth century, including special relativity, the origins of quantum theory, quantum mechanics, atomic structure, nuclear physics, and elementary particles.

Course usage information

PH-302   Theoretical PhysicsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: PH-212 passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Presents physics topics aimed at the advanced undergraduate level. The subjects range over classical mechanics, electromagnetism, and statistical mechanics, with explicit links made to topics from PH-301. The course is calculus-based, and seeks to round out the physics education of physics minors.

Course usage information

PH-398   Special Topics in Physics (300 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in physics to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

PH-399   Independent Study in PhysicsCredits: 1-3   

Course Type(s): None

Reading and research on a selected topic under the direction of a Physics faculty member.

Course usage information

PH-499   Independent Study in Physics (400 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Course Type(s): None

Reading and research on a selected topic under the direction of a Physics faculty member. Three hours per week per credit.

Course usage information

SC-100   Discovery and Thinking in Natural SciencesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

The development of major concepts in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences; their importance today.

Course usage information

SC-110   Nutrition ScienceCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

An overview of the science of human nutrition, including the basics of protein, carbohydrate, lipid, vitamin, mineral, water, and alcohol metabolism. An analysis of the relationship of diet to various health issues and current controversies in nutrition will be covered. Students will learn the elements of nutritional analysis by evaluating their personal diets. Emphasis will be on the manner in which nutrition knowledge is acquired, including a nutrition study conducted by the students.

Course usage information

SC-120   The Science of CookingCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

Covers concepts from chemistry, biology and physics that underpin the transformations that occur during food preparation and cooking. An understanding of why cooking techniques and recipes work will be examined. Cooking demonstrations and experiments will be used to illustrate the scientific concepts involved. Note: This course involves the preparation and (optional) consumption of food. If you have specific food allergies or needs, contact the instructor to discuss any arrangements that may be appropriate.

Course usage information

SC-130   Climate Science for 21st Century CitizensCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): SUS, NS

Earth's climate has changed in the past and will change in the future. Climate science and hypotheses about climate change and man's effects on climate figure prominently in the news and popular culture. However, forces and feedbacks impacting climate are poorly understood by the general public. This lack of understanding originates partially because climate science is complicated and interdisciplinary, and partially because addressing climate change requires significant changes in the global energy economy, turning it into a political issue with skewed and un-scientific public discourse. This course aims to cover parts of climate science that are well established, differentiate them clearly from parts of climate science where genuine uncertainty exists and use these contrasts to illustrate the scientific methods, culture of science and science practices of the 21st Century.

Course usage information

SC-150   Drug DiscoveryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

Concepts of biology, chemistry and pharmacology are used to examine aspects of drug discovery from early recorded history to modern treatments for disease. Additionally, students will understand the impacts of key drug discoveries on society/public health. Note: No prior biology/chemistry knowledge is assumed.

Course usage information

SC-198   Special Topics in ScienceCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): NS

Study of a particular subject or problem in science to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or seminar basis. Courses would meet General Education requirements in the natural sciences.

Course usage information

SC-230   Introduction to MeteorologyCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): NS

Introduction to Meteorology provides an overview of the structure of the atmosphere, temperature measurements and the role of moisture in the development of clouds, precipitation, dew, air masses, wind fronts, thunderstorms, cyclogenesis, tornados, and hurricanes. This course discusses the relationship between ocean currents and winds and the pivotal role they play in equalizing latitudinal energy imbalances. Elements of weather forecasting, instrumentation, and communication will be examined. The variation between weather and climate will be discussed and related to our global concerns of climate change on our daily lives.

Course usage information

SC-270   OceanographyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MEBP

Provides a survey of physical, chemical, geological, and biological resources and processes that define and affect the coastal ocean including ocean basins, coasts, beaches, estuaries, and offshore waters. Environmental considerations include the role of the oceans in the association with global climate change issues, problems associated with coastal development, exploitation of marine resources, and ocean and coastal pollution.