Biology

Chair: Dorothy Lobo, Department of Biology

The Biology curriculum is designed to give students a basic diversified background in the life sciences and prepare them for graduate work, professional school (medicine, dentistry, podiatry, chiropractic, etc.), laboratory work in government and industry, and careers in teaching.

National Biological Honor Society: Beta Beta Beta, Chi Eta Chapter, requires completion of at least ten credits of biology and a 3.2 or better GPA in biology courses.

Department Honors can be earned in Biology based on the following criteria being met:

  • Achieving a 3.3 or better overall GPA with a 3.5 or better GPA in biology courses;
  • Completing two additional courses at the 300 or 400 level;
  • Completing six credits of faculty-directed research and presenting a research thesis.

Jason E. Adolf, Associate Professor. BS, Roger Williams University; MS, University of Hawai'i; PhD, University of Maryland.
jadolf@monmouth.edu

Pedram Daneshgar, Associate Professor. BA, University of Delaware; MS, Saint Joseph’s University; PhD, University of Florida. Dr. Daneshgar's research interests include community and ecosystem ecology of coastal systems including dunes and mangroves, impacts of invasive plant species, and diversity maintenance mechanisms of grasslands.
pdaneshg@monmouth.edu

Ellen Doss-Pepe, Lecturer. BS, University of Scranton; PhD, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Specializes in biochemistry, protein folding and misfolding, and protein degradation. Current interests include the relationship of protein misfolding and degradation as underlying causes of neurodegenerative diseases and the roles of antioxidant proteins in cells during oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.
edoss@monmouth.edu

Bernadette Dunphy, Specialist Professor.
Co-Director of the Pre-Professional Health Advising Committee. PT, DPT, University Medicine and Dentistry, NJ. Specializes in physical therapy, sports medicine, and anatomy and physiology. Current interests are integration of clinical skills and case study work with teaching Physiology and Anatomy as well as preparing students for graduate health programs.
bdunphy@monmouth.edu

Keith Dunton, Assistant Professor. BS, MS, PhD, Stony Brook University. Current research interests are focused on the ecology, management, and conservation of marine fisheries with a specialized focus on species of concern.
kdunton@monmouth.edu

Ivan Gepner, Associate Professor. BA, Rutgers University; MA, PhD, Princeton University. Specializes in genetics and developmental biology. Current interests include computer applications in biology, especially computer modeling and simulation of natural phenomena.
gepner@monmouth.edu

Martin J. Hicks, Assistant Professor. BA, San Diego State University; PhD, University of California, Irvine. Specializes in genetics, gene therapy and RNA molecular biology. Current research is focused on the generation and genetic delivery of RNA and protein therapeutics to the tumor microenvironment in brain cancer.
mhicks@monmouth.edu

Cathryn Kubera, Assistant Professor. BS, Cornell University; PhD, University of Pennsylvania. Specializes in cell and molecular biology and neuroscience. Current research interests include cell signaling regulation of proliferation, migration, integration and cell death during brain development.
ckubera@monmouth.edu

Kathryn Ann Lionetti, Associate Professor. BS, PhD, State University of New York at Stony Brook. Specializes in microbiology and molecular biology. Current interests include recombinant DNA technology, apoptosis, and applications of molecular biology in clinical diagnostic procedures and emerging viral diseases.
lionetti@monmouth.edu

Dorothy Lobo, Associate Professor and Chair.
Co-Director of the Pre-Professional Health Advising Committee. BA, Immaculate College; PhD, The Catholic University of America. Specializes in cell and molecular biology, and signal transduction pathways. Current research includes the regulation of stress signaling pathways during cell proliferation and programmed cell death, and the use of crafts and models for teaching molecular biology.
dlobo@monmouth.edu

James P. Mack, Professor. BS, Monmouth University (Monmouth College); MS, William Paterson College; EdD, Teachers College, Columbia University. Specializes in anatomy and physiology. Current research includes alternative treatment for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in health care settings including MRSA, MSSA, Pseudomas aeruginosa, E. coli (ESBL), and Enterococcus (VRE).
mack@monmouth.edu

Tiffany Medley, Lecturer. PhD, City University of New York. Specializes in environmental policy, esturarine ecology, and ecosystem restoration. Current research includes evaluating the abudance and health of wild oysters in the Hudson River Estuary.
tmedley@monmouth.edu

Michael Palladino, Professor.
Vice Provost of Graduate Studies. BS, The College of New Jersey (Trenton State College); PhD, University of Virginia. Specializes in male reproductive biology and cell and molecular biology. Current research includes antimicrobial properties of male reproductive organs, and cellular and molecular responses to ischemia and hypoxia in the mammalian testis.
mpalladi@monmouth.edu

Karen Pesce, Lecturer. BA, BS, MS, Seton Hall University; PhD, Rutgers University. Specializes in environmental microbiology. Current research interests include microbial community analysis and characterization of noval biodegradative genes from polluted environments.
kpesce@monmouth.edu

Megan Phifer-Rixey, Assistant Professor. BS, Duke University; PhD, University of Pennsylvania.
mphiferr@monmouth.edu

Dennis Rhoads, Professor. BA, University of Delaware; PhD, University of Cincinnati. Specializes in biochemistry and neuroscience. Current research on neurobiology of alcohol and drug abuse.
drhoads@monmouth.edu

Jeffrey Weisburg, Specialist Professor. BA, PhD, Cornell-Weill Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Specializes in anatomy and physiology and immunology. Current research involves the use of nutraceuticals and food derivatives that have pharmacological properties for treat cancers of the oral cavity and leukemia.
jweiss@monmouth.edu

Course usage information

BY-101   Issues and Methods of BiologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: SC-100.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Major concepts in biological science and their importance in current society. Methods and approaches to questions in biology. Cannot be used in satisfaction of a major requirement in the Biology program.

Course usage information

BY-102   Applications in BiotechnologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

Introduction for non-science majors. The focus is on basic principles of biotechnology along with an exploration of associated bioethical issues. The laboratory component serves to familiarize students with scientific practice.

Course usage information

BY-103   Environmental ScienceCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

Examines society's effects on the natural environment and current efforts to address environmental issues in a sustainable manner. Stresses the interdisciplinary nature of environmental issues, and that resolution of environmental problems sustainably involves the application of sound scientific information, but at the same time involves social, political, cultural, and economic values as well.

Course usage information

BY-104   Human BiologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

Introductory course for non-science majors. Focus is on basic structure and function of human body systems and diseases of these systems. The laboratory component serves to familiarize students with scientific practice.

Course usage information

BY-105   Introductory Biology and Human DevelopmentCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

An introductory-level survey of biology with an emphasis on human biology that includes human development, aging, genetics and other topics selected to support the social work program. An introduction to neurobiology will be provided with applications in mental health. Not for credit toward a major in biology. For Social Work majors only.

Course usage information

BY-106   The Brain - Highs and LowsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): NS

An introductory neurobiology course designed for non-science majors. The focus is the study of the human brain from the highs of intelligence and creativity to the lows of depression. The brain will also be examined for its roles in drug use, from the highs of euphoria to the lows of dependence. Topics will include the interplay between genetic and environmental influences that shape the brain and its responses. Not for credit towards a major in Biology.

Course usage information

BY-107   Microbiology in Health and DiseaseCredits: 4   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Microorganisms pathogenic for man; emphasizing etiology, modes of transmission and control. Laboratory includes proper collection of specimens, aseptic technique, cultivation, identification, and disposal of microbes. Three hours of class, two hours of laboratory per week.

Course usage information

BY-108   Evolution and the History of Life on EarthCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): NS

Examines evolution both as a process and as a phenomenon. Students will examine how evolutionary processes occur in time, both very short and geological time scales, and how both are studied. Students will review the history of life on earth with emphasis on major lineages such as vertebrates, mollusks, insects and plants, as well as basic geological processes and continental drift during these time periods. Bacterial evolution will be examined in the context of the importance of understanding natural selection and evolution and their impacts on society and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on understanding evolution of groups and processes often cited in creationist arguments, to help students be prepared to enter civil discourse as informed citizens. Evidence of evolutionary change from the fossil record and DNA sequences of organisms will be compared and reviewed.

Course usage information

BY-109   Introduction to Biodiversity and EvolutionCredits: 4   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

An introductory course for biology majors. Focus is on evolution, phylogeny, taxonomy, origin and diversity of life, physiology of plant and animal systems, and ecological principles. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Limited to students who are majors in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Computer Science and Software Engineering.

Course usage information

BY-110   Introduction to Cell and Molecular BiologyCredits: 4   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

For biology majors and other students needing an introduction to the cellular and molecular levels of biology. Includes an introduction to cell structure and function, biochemistry and metabolism, bioenergetics, genetics and cell division, and molecular biology. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Limited to majors in Biology, Chemistry, Clinical Science, Medical Laboratory Science, Mathematics, Computer Science, Software Engineering, Criminal Justice, Health Studies, and Health and Physical Education.

Course usage information

BY-111   Anatomy and Physiology ICredits: 4   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

Study of human systems: structure, function and integration. Semester I: Chemical and cellular base, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Semester II: Respiratory, nervous, endocrine, urinary, reproductive, and digestive systems. Laboratory covers gross mammalian anatomy, microscopy of tissues and organs, and physiological study of living organisms. Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week. Open to Health majors, Health and Physical Education majors, Health and Physical Education and Education majors, and Nursing majors only.

Course usage information

BY-112   Anatomy and Physiology IICredits: 4   

Prerequisite: BY-111; passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): NS

Study of human systems: structure, function and integration. Semester I: Chemical and cellular base, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Semester II: Respiratory, nervous, endocrine, urinary, reproductive, and digestive systems. Laboratory covers gross mammalian anatomy, microscopy of tissues and organs, and physiological study of living organisms. Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week. Open to Health majors, Health and Physical Education majors, Health and Physical Education and Education majors, and Nursing majors only.

Course usage information

BY-113   Introduction to Structure and Function of Living SystemsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): NS

Examines the characteristics of living organisms. Intended primarily for future elementary teachers to provide them with a better understanding of the life sciences they will teach. Content will focus on the structure and function of cells, tissues and organs and life processes. There is an emphasis on understanding heredity, including patterns of inheritance of traits and the molecular basis of heredity, and growth and development. This is an activity-centered/lab course to demonstrate scientific inquiry (questioning, developing hypotheses, gathering data, and drawing reasonable conclusions) and how to use resources and research material in science. BY-113 does not count towards the Biology major or minor requirements.

Course usage information

BY-114   Unity and Diversity of LifeCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Intended primarily for future elementary school teachers to provide them with a better understanding of the life sciences they will teach. Examining the interdependence and individuality of organisms in ecosystems, populations and communities and how these organisms change over time due to life cycles, mutations, adaptions and natural selection. Classification of organism will also be covered. This is an activity-centered/lab course to demonstrate scientific inquiry (questioning, developing hypotheses, gathering data, and drawing reasonable conclusions) and how to use resources and research material in science. BY-114 does not count towards the Biology major or minor requirements.

Course usage information

BY-116   The Biology of Nutrition, Aging, and Anti-Aging NutritionCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Discussions of the theories of aging and the role of nutrition in delaying aging and preventing degenerative disease. Analysis of the scientifically sound, medically reliable evaluation of widely promoted nutritional supplements, including the anti-aging nutrients: vitamins, minerals, amino acids, nucleic acid derivatives, lipids and derivatives, pharmaceuticals and chemicals (BHA, BHT, DMSO, etc.) and other supplements (L-Carnitine, ginseng, etc.)

Course usage information

BY-198   Special Topics in Biology (100 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): MC, ME

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in biology to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted in a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format.

Course usage information

BY-201   Introduction to BiotechnologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-110, passed with a minimum grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): MC, ME, MEBP

Introduction to recent advances in biotechnology: the use of living organisms to create products, applications or processes that improve the quality of life for humans and other species. Presents historical and modern applications of biotechnology that impact our everyday lives. An overview of current developments and applications of microbial, agricultural, animal, marine and forensic biotechnology, bioremediation, and medical biotechnology will be presented. Regulatory agencies and policies that govern the biotechnology industry will be discussed, and students will also learn to formulate opinions about ethical, legal and social issues associated with biotechnology.

Course usage information

BY-202   Human Biology and HealthCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-113 and BY-114; both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Intended primarily for future elementary school teachers to provide them with a better understanding of the life sciences they will teach. This course will concentrate on basic physiology of the human body looking at the different organ systems. There will be an emphasis on understanding regulation and behavior, such as how the body responds to external stimuli and controls the internal environment. Personal health including nutrition, human disease, microbiology, immunology and substance abuse will be examined. This is an activity-centered/lab course to demonstrate scientific inquiry (questioning, developing hypotheses, gathering data, and drawing reasonable conclusions) and how to use resources and research material in science. BY-202 does not count towards the Biology major or minor requirements.

Course usage information

BY-205   ZoologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-109 passed with a grade of C- or better.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Provides an introductory survey of vertebrate and invertebrate zoology. Topics covered include taxonomy and classification, anatomy and physiology, behavior and ecology, and evolutionary relationships of the major phyla of the animal kingdom.

Course usage information

BY-210   Forensic Genetics and DNA AnalysisCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-110 and CJ-211.

Course Type(s): None

Focus on fundamental principles of DNA and genetic analysis and their applications in forensics. Designed for criminal justice majors who have had an introduction to Mendelian and molecular genetics and to DNA structure, but who need more background in the underlying biology of forensic DNA analysis and interpretation. Sources of DNA will be presented along with methods for DNA extraction, amplification of DNA by polymerase chain reaction, analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms and short tandem repeats. Open only to Criminal Justice majors.

Course usage information

BY-211   Physiology with Anatomy ICredits: 4   

Prerequisites: BY-110, CE-111, and CE-112 all passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Lecture and laboratory course Study of Human Systems: Their structure, function and integration. Laboratory covers gross human anatomy and physiology. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Open only to Biology, Chemistry, Medical Lab Science, Clinical Lab Science, Health, and Psychology majors.

Course usage information

BY-212   Physiology with Anatomy IICredits: 4   

Prerequisites: BY-110, BY-211, CE-111, and CE-112.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Lecture and laboratory course Study of Human Systems: Their structure, function and integration. Laboratory covers gross human anatomy and physiology. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Open only to Biology, Chemistry, Medical Lab Science, Clinical Lab Science, Health, and Psychology majors.

Course usage information

BY-214   BotanyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-109 passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Characteristics of the major plant groups, principles of plant taxonomy, considerations of evolutionary and ecological relationships. Two hours of class, two hours of laboratory per week.

Course usage information

BY-220   Environmental Biology and PolicyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-109.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ME, SUS

Focuses on human use of natural resources and the environment and the problems and impacts that result from those uses. By taking an interdisciplinary perspective, students will gain an understanding of the scientific, political and socioeconomic factors that underlie resolution of these problems.

Course usage information

BY-221   Introduction to Global SustainabilityCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): MEBP, SUS

Introduces students to the global, environmental, economic and social foundations of sustainability and the policy and scientific challenges involved with accommodating population growth, development, and resources used while assuring that future generations will have the natural and economic resources to support an enhanced quality of life. An emphasis will be placed on understanding of sustainability principles from multiple perspectives and cross-disciplinary application of sustainable practices. Also listed as PS-223.

Course usage information

BY-223   General MicrobiologyCredits: 4   

Prerequisite: BY-110, passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MEBP

Morphology, taxonomy, physiology, genetics, and control of microorganisms; history of microbiology. Three hours of class, three hours of laboratory per week.

Course usage information

BY-250   Research in Molecular Cell PhysiologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-110, passed with a minimum grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX5, MC

Faculty-student collaborative research lab course designed to introduce students to the research process. Students will work in small groups under faculty supervision to conduct research on a project in molecular cell physiology determined by the directing faculty member. Students will be involved in the research process by developing hypotheses, planning and carrying out experiments using modern lab techniques, analyzing data, and evaluating resource information. Research may be extended in detail in BY-450. Limited to sophomore Biology majors.

Course usage information

BY-250A   Research in Molecular Cell PhysiologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-110.

Course Type(s): MC

Faculty-student collaborative research lab course designed to introduce students to the research process. Students will work in small groups under faculty supervision to conduct research on a project in molecular cell physiology determined by the directing faculty member. Students will be involved in the research process by developing hypotheses, planning and carrying out experiments using modern lab techniques, analyzing data, and evaluating resource information. Research may be extended in detail in BY-450. Limited to sophomore Biology majors. (BY-250A is for students who do not need experiential education credit. Students who need experiential education credit should register for BY-250.)

Course usage information

BY-251   Field Research Methods in Marine ScienceCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-109, CE-111, CE-111L, CE-112, and CE-112L; all passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MEBP

Provides students with hands on experience in marine and coastal research by working on-board small research vessels under real field conditions. Students become familiar with the use and application of standard marine science instruments and sampling devices, as well as data handling, management and analysis techniques.

Course usage information

BY-290   Open Water Scuba Certification CourseCredits: 2   

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): MEBP

The Open Water Scuba Certification course entails completion of the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) Open Water Diver course, the world's most popular scuba course. Completion of this course leads to PADI scuba certification as an open water diver. Limited to 8 students. This is a pass/fail course.

Course usage information

BY-298   Special Topics in Biology (200 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MC, ME

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in biology to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted in a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format. Please note: when Scuba is offered as BY 298 it does not carry a course type of MC.

Course usage information

BY-299   Independent Study in BiologyCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: Prior permission of the directing professor and department chair; Sophomore standing in Biology (Total of all independent study credits to be counted towards the degree may not exceed six, unless approved by the Dean).

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Principles of independent study and research; critical review of published work on a designated topic in the biological sciences or original research; preparation of a research paper or review article in publishable format or oral presentation of research results. Laboratory or field work arranged as needed. Requires submission and approval of an "Application for Independent Study" (an e-form is available on WEBadvisor) with a faculty mentor.

Course usage information

BY-301   Vertebrate HistologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-205 passed with a minimum grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MC

Microscopic structure of vertebrate cells, tissues, and organs, emphasizing microscopic anatomy of the human body. Laboratory identification of vertebrate tissues. Two hours of class, three hours of laboratory per week.

Course usage information

BY-303   Biological OceanographyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-109, BY-205, and BY-214; all passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MEBP

Biological Oceanography provides an introduction to the biology of life in the sea. Biological Oceanography emphasizes the fundamental oceanographic processes that control the distribution and abundance of living organisms in the sea. Two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.

Course usage information

BY-305   IchthyologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-109 and BY-205, and MA-151; all passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MEBP

A survey of all extant group of fishes, including sections on evolution, taxonomy, form and function, biogeography, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory component will include required dissections. Some field trips may be scheduled outside of class time. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.

Course usage information

BY-310   Biochemistry and LabCredits: 4   

Prerequisite: CE-242 passed with a grade of C- or higher; and EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): WT

A survey of the major principles of biochemistry with attention to the structures and functions of proteins, carbohydrates and fats; the major pathways for metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates and fats; and the biochemical basis of DNA replication and gene expression. Laboratory provides hands-on experience in selected biochemical techniques with an emphasis on protein characterization. Designed to provide practice and critique in effective writing and appropriate writing style and format.

Course usage information

BY-312   Physical BiochemistryCredits: 2   

Prerequisites: PH-105, PH-105L, PH-106 and PH-106L, or PH-211, PH-211L, PH-212 and PH-212L, MA-116 or MA-126, and BY-310.

Corequisite: CE-342L.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Foundations of thermodynamics, spectroscopy, and computational chemistry in the exploration of biochemical problems. Characterization and exploration of biochemical reactions and bio macromolecules. Also listed as CE-312.

Course usage information

BY-314   Topics in HorticultureCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MC, ME, MEBP

Principles and practices of plant culture; practical experience through greenhouse projects; the horticulture industry and career possibilities; field trips to places of horticultural interest. Two hours of class, three hours of laboratory per week. Field trips arranged.

Course usage information

BY-317   Tropical Island EcologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-109 passed with a grade of C- or higher and or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EX5, ME, MEBP, NS

A field course focusing on investigations of plants, animals, and natural ecosystems of the Bahamas with emphasis on marine ecosystems, island ecology, resource management, and sustainable development.

Course usage information

BY-324   Applied MicrobiologyCredits: 4   

Prerequisite: BY-223 passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): MC, ME, MEBP

Microorganisms of food, water, soil, dairy products, industrial processes, disease, and genetic engineering. Three hours of class, three hours of laboratory per week.

Course usage information

BY-340   EcologyCredits: 4   

Prerequisites: BY-109, BY-205, BY-214, BY-220, MA-151 and MA-116; all passed with a grade of C- or higher and EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): WT

Lecture and laboratory course examining the basic concepts of ecology and evolutionary biology, the interaction of organisms and their environment, population ecology, community ecology, and ecosystems dynamics. 3 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab/field work per week.

Course usage information

BY-342   Coastal Zone ManagementCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-109 and BY-220, both passed with a grade of C- or higher, and EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): ME, WT

Focus on the impact of increased demand on the coastal environment based on the theme that management of an environment for multiple purposes requires an understanding of the effects of use and exploitation throughout that environmental system and how decisions can be made in an effective, equitable manner.

Course usage information

BY-360   The Business of Biotechnology: From the Bench to the MarketCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Limited to junior of senior biology majors or other students with approval by the course faculty.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): MC

Tomorrow's biotechnology leaders require a breadth of cross-functional knowledge to face the scientific, regulatory, and financial challenges for developing biotech companies in the 21st century. This course will provide students with a strategic overview of the business of biotechnology, exploring the integration of science, technology, the regulatory framework, financial requirements, and market forces that drive the industry. The course will introduce students to basic aspects of molecular biology related to product development in the biopharmaceutical industry, and the regulatory and financial requirements for drug development, placing emphasis on real-world application and the challenges of bringing new biotechnology drugs to market for the treatment of human disease. BY-110 or BY-201 completed with a minimum grade of C- or higher. Business majors who have successfully completed BY-102, BY-110, or BY-201, completed with a minimum grade of C- or higher.

Course usage information

BY-370   Cell BiologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-310 passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

In-depth study of biology at the cellular and subcellular levels. Integrates principles of biochemistry into an understanding of cell structure and physiology.

Course usage information

BY-375L   Laboratory in Molecular and Cellular BiologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-310, passed with a grade of C- or higher; and EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): RD, WT

Designed to introduce biology majors to basic laboratory techniques used in molecular and cellular biology. Students will develop proficiency in modern techniques in molecular and cellular biology including micro pipetting, bacterial culturing and sterile technique, solution preparation, DNA extraction, restriction digestion of DNA, DNA sub cloning, gel electrophoresis of nucleic acids and proteins, nucleic acid blotting and analysis with molecular probes, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunological techniques for analysis of proteins, mammalian cell culture and transfection, and DNA sequence analysis on the Internet. The use of traditional and Internet information resources for molecular and cellular biology will also be emphasized. The presentation of data in both oral and written form will be emphasized. Partially fulfills the reasoned oral discourse requirement for biology and biology/molecular cell physiology.

Course usage information

BY-388   Cooperative Education: Biological SciencesCredits: 1-4   

Prerequisites: Overall GPA of 2.00; Junior standing with at least six credits in biology courses.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX2

Provides an opportunity for students to fulfill the Experiential Education requirement by pursuing a short-term cooperative work experience in biology or for students who, are currently employed in a biological or medical field, to integrate the work with a related academic component. May be repeated for credit. This is a pass/fail course.

Course usage information

BY-389   Internship in Biological ScienceCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: Overall GPA of 2.00; Junior standing with at least six credits in biology courses.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX1

Complements the practical experience gained by students at internship sites, such as hospitals, clinics, private practices, research laboratories, environmental agencies, museums, botanical gardens, and zoos with a significant set of academic goals. May be repeated once for credit. This is a pass/fail course.

Course usage information

BY-395   Seminar in Marine and Environmental BiologyCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): MEBP, RD

A seminar-style course for juniors in the Marine and Environmental Biology and Policy (MEBP) major.

Course usage information

BY-398   Special Topics in Biology (300 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MC, ME

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in biology to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted in a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format.

Course usage information

BY-399   Independent Study in BiologyCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: Prior permission of the directing professor and department chair; Junior standing in Biology.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Principles of independent study and research; critical review of published work on a designated topic in the biological sciences or original research; preparation of a research paper or review article in publishable format or oral presentation of research results. Laboratory or field work arranged as needed. Requires submission and approval of an "Application for Independent Study" an e-form is available on WEBadvisor) with a faculty member. (Total of all independent study credits to be counted towards the degree may not exceed six, unless approved by the Dean.)

Course usage information

BY-404   Animal BehaviorCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: PY-103; or BY-103 or above, passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Why and how animals(vertebrates and invertebrates) do the things they do. Emphasizes rules governing the evolution of behavior rather than mere description of how animals behave. Focus includes behavioral ecology, habitat selection, feeding strategies, predator-prey tactics, mating systems and strategies, social behavior (conflict and cooperation) and population dynamics. The course begins with an historical overview and ends with the evolution of human behavior. Also listed as PY-404.

Course usage information

BY-404L   Animal Behavior LaboratoryCredits: 1   

Prerequisites: PY-311 and PY-320 passed with a grade of "C" or higher.

Corequisite: BY-404 or PY-404.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Methods in the study of animal behavior. Projects on instinctive behavior, early experience, learning, dominance relationships, territoriality, behavioral ecology, and sociobiology. One all-day field trip and an independent project will be required.

Course usage information

BY-406   Introduction to NeurosciencesCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Six credits of biology or chemistry courses.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): MC, ME

The organization of the nervous system in terms of its anatomy, physiology, neurochemical correlates, and evolution; behavioral processes such as attention, sleep, motivation, instinct, learning, and languages.

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BY-406L   Neurosciences LaboratoryCredits: 1   

Corequisite: BY-406.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MC

Human and animal neuroanatomy; surgical techniques, including lesion, stimulation, and perfusion; histology; drug and hormone administration; physiological recording techniques. Three hours per week.

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BY-410   Molecular BiologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-310 or BY-423; passed with a grade of C- or higher, or CE-331 passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Provides a detailed examination of the central dogma of molecular biology - DNA replication, transcription, reverse transcription, and translation - in viruses, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes. Standard techniques of biotechnology used to study molecular biology will be emphasized. Additional topics, including eukaryotic chromosome structure and regulation of gene expression, will also be discussed.

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BY-412   Vertebrate Physiology and LaboratoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MC

Comparative vertebrate physiology, with emphasis on osmotic regulation, nutrition, circulation, respiration, and muscle physiology. One hour of class, four hours of laboratory per week.

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BY-420   Ecosystems AnalysisCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-205, BY-214, and BY-340, all passed with a grade of C- or higher, and Senior standing in the MEBP major.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EX5, MEBP

Applied ecology course combining lectures, hands-on field and laboratory activities, and focused data collection and analysis to allow students to understand techniques used by scientists and managers in order to provide information necessary to perform key functions associated with ecosystem management.

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BY-423   GeneticsCredits: 4   

Prerequisites: BY-110 passed with a minimum grade of C- or higher and at least Junior status.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MEBP

Lecture of classical and molecular genetics; applications in human heredity; structure and function of genetic material and gene regulation, laboratory exercises using Drosophila, bacteria, and bacterial viruses as experimental material. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week.

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BY-424   EvolutionCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-109 and BY-110, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): MC, ME, MEBP

Synthetic theory of evolution, including sources of genetic variability, Hardy-Weinberg, natural selection, genetic drift, balanced polymorphism, molecular evolution, speciation and the origin of life. Three hours of class per week.

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BY-425   Principles of Developmental BiologyCredits: 4   

Prerequisites: BY-110 and BY-423.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

The study of major morphological changes during development and the analysis of causative factors. Model organisms used in the study of development include: sea urchin, nematode worm, Drosophila, frog, and mouse. Topics include: fertilization, growth, differentiation, morphogenesis, regeneration, and tissue interactions. The genetic control of development will be emphasized.

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BY-431   ImmunologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-110 passed with a minimum grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): MC

Components of the immune system; biological individuality and the recognition of "foreignness"; structure of antibodies; cellular immunity and graft rejection; blood group antigens; the immune system and cancer development; immunogenetics; clinical and experimental applications. Two hours of class, two hours of laboratory per week.

Course usage information

BY-441   Marine BiologyCredits: 4   

Prerequisites: BY-205 and BY-214, both passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): RD

Biota of the oceans and inshore waters with emphasis on taxonomy, ecology, and distribution. Basic oceanography included. A field course supported by lecture and laboratory. Field trips outside of assigned class time may be required.

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BY-442   Natural Resource Conservation and ManagementCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: BY-109 and BY-220 both passed with a grade of C- or higher, and EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ME, SUS, WT

The principles of ecology and resource management are used to analyze contemporary environmental problems and highlight legislative, technological, and methodological solutions to environmental problems that move us toward a sustainable society.

Course usage information

BY-450   Research in Molecular Cell PhysiologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-310 passed with a minimum grade of C- or higher.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX5, MC

A faculty-student collaborative research lab course. Students will work in small groups under faculty supervision to conduct comprehensive research on a project in molecular cell physiology determined by the directing faculty member. Students will experience all aspects of the research process, from developing hypotheses, planning and carrying out experiments using modern lab techniques, and analyzing data, to preparing research results for publication. May be taken to extend research initiated in BY-250. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Limited to Junior or Senior biology majors.

Course usage information

BY-450A   Research in Molecular Cell PhysiologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-310.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MC

A faculty-student collaborative research lab course. Students will work in small groups under faculty supervision to conduct comprehensive research on a project in molecular cell physiology determined by the directing faculty member. Students will experience all aspects of the research process, from developing hypotheses, planning and carrying out experiments using modern lab techniques, and analyzing data, to preparing research results for publication. May be taken to extend research initiated by BY-250A. (Students who do not need experiential education credit should register for BY-450A. Students who need experiential education credit should register for BY-450.) Limited to Junior or Senior biology majors.

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BY-475   EndocrinologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: BY-310 or twelve credits in Biology.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): MC, ME

Introduction to biochemical, molecular, and physiological aspects of the vertebrate endocrine system and mechanisms by which hormones maintain homeostasis in animals, including humans. Topics to be studied include: molecular structures: biochemical properties and interactions of different categories of hormones and their receptors; major endocrine systems that regulate reproduction, growth, development, and metabolism; neuroendocrinology; and pathophysiology of the endocrine system. Hormones and organs that influence processes such as calcium homeostasis, digestion, salt balance, carbohydrate metabolism, and sex differentiation and development will be examined. Endocrine regulation of male and female reproductive organs and reproduction will also be discussed, including the hormonal control of fertilization, implantation, placental function, pregnancy, parturition, lactation, and contraception.

Course usage information

BY-488   Cooperative Education: Biological SciencesCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: Overall GPA of 2.00; Junior standing with at least six credits in biology courses.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EX2

Provides an opportunity for students to fulfill the experiential education requirement by pursuing a short-term cooperative work experience in biology or who are currently employed in a biological or medical field to integrate the work with a related academic component. May be repeated for credit.

Course usage information

BY-495   Senior SeminarCredits: 1   

Prerequisite: Senior standing; open only to Biology majors.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): RD

A seminar course with presentations by guest scientists as well as students. Gauges students' abilities to draw upon a broad background of coursework and experience to organize, present, discuss, and evaluate topics of current interest in biology.

Course usage information

BY-498   Special Topics in Biology (400 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): MC, ME

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in biology to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted in a lecture, seminar, or laboratory format.

Course usage information

BY-499   Independent Study in BiologyCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: Prior permission of the directing professor and department chair; Senior standing in Biology.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Principles of independent study and research; critical review of published work on a designated topic in the biological sciences or original research; preparation of a research paper or review article in publishable format or oral presentation of research results. Laboratory or field work arranged as needed. Requires submission and approval of an "Application for Independent Study" (an e-form is available on WEBadvisor) with a faculty member. (Total of all independent study credits to be counted towards the degree may not exceed six, unless approved by the Dean.)

Course usage information

BY-499T   Independent Study in Biology with ThesisCredits: 1   

Prerequisite: Permission of the course advisor, Senior standing in Biology, Biology with a concentration in Cell and Molecular Physiology, or Marine and Environmental Biology and Policy.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Preparation and submission of a thesis in science journal format. The thesis will contain results from the completion of independent study and research and will include appropriate description of the background and methods for the project and discussion of the results and its significance. It is designed specifically for students desiring Biology departmental honors.

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MS-198   OceanographyCredits: 4   

Term Offered: Summer Term

Course Type(s): ME

Study of the physical and chemical properties of sea water; oceanic circulation; waves and tides; and estuarine and shoreline processes.

Course usage information

MS-298   Introduction to Marine BiologyCredits: 4   

Term Offered: Summer Term

Course Type(s): ME

The student will be able to identify the environmental parameters of marine habitats and their effect on the distribution of the marine flora and fauna. The student will collect and identify numerous representatives of local marine forms and become proficient in the utilization of the various kinds of equipment necessary to complete these tasks. The student will also gain knowledge regarding marine organism physiology, behavior, and anatomy.

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MS-298A   Introduction to Marine SciencesCredits: 4   

Term Offered: Summer Term

Course Type(s): ME

Oceanography will be explored.

Course usage information

MS-298C   Special Topics in Marine ScienceCredits: 1-4   

Course Type(s): ME

Marine and Environmental Chemistry. The study of the chemical constituents of seawater, their properties and interactions, including their reactions at the air-sea and sea-bottom interfaces. Sampling and analytic techniques.

Course usage information

MS-498A   Special Topics in Marine SciencesCredits: 1-3   

Term Offered: Summer Term

Course Type(s): ME

Seashore Ornithology. Brief identifications of birds of the ocean, salt marsh, sand dunes, and adjacent land areas. Includes discussion of habits and ecology.

Course usage information

MS-498B   Special Topics in Marine SciencesCredits: 1   

Term Offered: Summer Term

Course Type(s): ME

Marine Pollution and Solutions. The identification, monitoring, origin, movement and fate of toxic substances in the marine environment with emphasis on New Jersey's estuaries and oceanic environments. The impacts of contaminants on biota and man will be discussed.

Course usage information

MS-498C   Special Topics in Marine SciencesCredits: 1-3   

Term Offered: Summer Term

Course Type(s): ME

Management of Marine Resources. An overview of the economic, political, legal and social problems related to management of the diversity of legitimate uses of marine resources, including fisheries, mineral and energy resources and waste disposal.