The School of Social Work

Dean:  Robin Mama, PhD

Director of the BSW Program: Elena Mazza, PhD

Director of the MSW Program: Carolyn Bradley, PhD

Social workers are concerned with improving the health and quality of life of persons who are disconnected or excluded from larger society. Social workers engage in practice at all levels, from working with children to working with communities and governments. The profession and the program at Monmouth are particularly concerned with human rights and social and economic justice, the representation and support of vulnerable or oppressed segments of the population, and direct-action strategies to bring about positive change for the disenfranchised.

The central mission of the School of Social Work at Monmouth University is to prepare its graduates for professional social work practice that strives to secure social and economic justice,  advance human rights, and improve the quality of life of vulnerable families, individuals, organizations, communities, and nations on the local, national, and global levels.

The BSW Program prepares students for generalist professional social work practice. Secondarily, the BSW Program prepares social work students for graduate social work education. The BSW Program also introduces individuals within the University community to relevant social work and social welfare issues.

On the foundation of a liberal arts tradition, students are engaged to broaden and challenge their understanding, analysis, and evaluation of human experiences and societies in the past and in the contemporary world, and of families and individuals of varied cultural and social contexts.

The curriculum supports this mission through three perspectives:

  • social and economic justice through the advancement of human rights,
  • strengths-based empowerment, and
  • practice with families within a global context.

Families within a global context define the initial focal social unit for all social work practice at Monmouth University.

Our three perspectives inform both our BSW and MSW programs as they contribute to the development of students’ knowledge, values, and skills:

  1. To conceptualize and contribute to social work theory, knowledge, values, and skills on a generalist level for BSW students, and on an advanced, concentration-specific level for MSW students through three interrelated perspectives: social and economic justice through the advancement of human rights, strengths-based empowerment, and practice with families within a global context;
  2. To develop the skills to understand, analyze, and evaluate the quality of life and well-being of vulnerable families, individuals, organizations, communities, and nations that is grounded in a strengths-based empowerment approach for social and economic justice and human rights;
  3. To prepare social work practitioners to develop and systematically apply knowledge, values, skills, and ethics in their work with families, individuals, organizations, communities, and nations of diverse cultural contexts in working collaboratively toward the prevention and solution of social problems;
  4. To think critically, analyze, produce, and disseminate research that informs theory, policy, practice, and evaluation in social work;
  5. To collaborate with and support vulnerable populations through advocacy, social action, volunteerism, service, education, and consultation, working from a strengths-based empowerment approach for social and economic justice and human rights.

School of Social Work Honor Society: Phi Alpha: Graduate and Undergraduate

Colleen Beach, Specialist Professor. BA, University of Scranton; MSW, Monmouth University. Practice and teaching experience is in elder justice, hospice and palliative care, long term services and supports for older adults, practice with communities, and trauma informed care. She is a member of several organizations focused on elder justice, such as the National Adult Protective Services Association (NAPSA) and the American Society on Aging. She currently serves on the NAPSA Education Committee and on the New Jersey Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services Trauma Informed Care Workgroup.
cbeach@monmouth.edu

Carolyn Bradley, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, College of St. Elizabeth; MSW, PhD, Fordham University. Areas of interest are addictions, spirituality, gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender issues. Current research is on spirituality and social work practice.
cbradley@monmouth.edu

Christine Costello, Lecturer. MSW, Rutgers University. Areas of interest are addictions with adult populations, animal-assisted therapy, and veterinary social work.
ccostell@monmouth.edu

Michael Cronin, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). MSW, Columbia University; PhD, Yeshiva University. Research interests in areas of international social work, healthcare and social policy, disaster management, social gerontology, and cultural competence.
mcronin@monmouth.edu

Cory Cummings, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BSW, Nazareth College of Rochester; MSW, University at Buffalo, School of Social Work (SUNY); ABD, Virginia Commonwealth University.
ccumming@monmouth.edu

Ralph Cuseglio, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). MSW, DSW, Rutgers University. Areas of interest include school social work, clinical social work, and psychoteraphy.

Anne Deepak, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Boston University; MS, PhD, Columbia University. Areas of research interest are in the delivery of diversity and social justice content in social work education, the application of postcolonial feminist social work perspective to global social problems, and the dynamics of Global North-South partnerships.
adeepak@monmouth.edu

Christa Hogan, Lecturer. BSW, Monmouth University; MSW, Fordham University. Extensive practice in geriatric social work as well as in specialized school settings working with special needs children. Her private practice focuses on individual counseling to children, adolescents, and adults. She also provides hospice services to the terminally ill.
chogan@monmouth.edu

Tawanda Hubbard, Specialist Professor. BS, Bloomfield College; MSW, ABD, Rutgers School of Social Work.
thubbard@monmouth.edu

Robin Mama, Professor (Graduate Faculty).
Dean of the School of Social Work. BSW, College of Misericordia; MSS, PhD, Bryn Mawr College. Areas of interest include occupational safety and health, field education, and culturally competent social work practice. Current research projects include international social work and human rights.
mama@monmouth.edu

Golam M. Mathbor, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BSS, MSS, Bachelor of Law (LLB), University of Dhaka, Bangladesh; MSW, McGill University; PhD, University of Calgary. Areas of interest include development and analysis of social policies and services, community organizing and social action, social planning, community development and community participation, and international social work. Current research interests include sustainable development of coastal communities, international development, and multicultural social work.
gmathbor@monmouth.edu

Elena Mazza, Associate Professor and Director of the BSW Program. BSW, Monmouth University; MSW Fordham University; PhD, New York University. Areas of interest are mental health, children’s mental health, and community-based mental health. Current research is on gatekeeping in social work education and mental illness and school integration.
emazza@monmouth.edu

Sanjana Ragudaran, Specialist Professor. BS, MSW, Flinders University, Australia; PhD, City Unviersity of New York. Areas of research interest include research advisory with community organizing groups, focusing on undocumented immigrants.
sragudar@monmouth.edu

Michelle Scott, Associate Professor. BA, Clark University; MSW, PhD, University of California, Berkeley. Areas of interest include adolescent depression, adolescent suicide prevention, school-based screening, mental health services and financing, college mental health, and initiation of alcohol use by adolescents. Current research incldues evaluation of the preparation of high school students with mental Health problems and the transition to college.
mscott@monmouth.edu

Nora Smith, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, MS, Columbia University; PhD, University of California at Berkeley. Research interests include applied quantitative decision making, operations research, and management science.
dsmtih@monmouth.edu

Paul Urbanski, Assistant Professor. BFA, University of Michigan; MSW, Columbina University; PhD, University of Albany, New York. Research interests include the impact of institutional settings on older adults and specifically on resident autonomy in long-term care facilities. Currently, he is interested in understanding the experiences of older adult Korean emigrants who have come to the U.S. as family caregivers.
purbansk@monmouth.edu

Joelle Zabotka, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Drew University; MSW, Columbia University; PhD, Rutgers University. Social work clinician who continues to practice, with research interests in child mental health and development, parenting, substance abuse, and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.
jzapotka@monmouth.edu

Course usage information

SW-105   Introduction to Social WorkCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Social work and its professional practices, its goals, guiding philosophy, and basic assumptions; the uses of the professional relationship; roles of the professional social worker and collaborative activity in the helping process. Not open to students who have completed SO-105. Previously listed as SW-101.

Course usage information

SW-198   Special Topics in Social Work (100 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in social work to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

SW-205   Global Human Rights and Social JusticeCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): BI.EL, GU, SJS, SUS

Examines social issues and injustices from a global perspective. A central focus will be the struggles of individuals, families, and communities from around the world. Introduces the student to the concepts of social justice, human rights, social welfare and oppression, and discusses ways to promote social welfare from a human rights and social justice perspective.

Course usage information

SW-222   Writing for Social WorkersCredits: 1   

Corequisite: SW-223.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Designed to prepare BSW students to successfully master the skill of writing professionally and effectively. Course work and activities will provide a hands-on experience with social work writing tasks. Topics addressed include standards for scholarly writing, conducting literature reviews, writing mechanics, writing logically and coherently, adhering to APA format, writing for social media, the use of strengths-based empowerment language, and resume writing. Intended to strengthen students' writing, an essential social work skill, and to support students' efforts on writing tasks assigned in future courses, internship placements, and in the field of social work.

Course usage information

SW-223   Human Behavior and Social Environment ICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: SW-105 or SW-205.

Corequisite: BY-105.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

A study of significant life tasks in the physical, social, and emotional development of the individual.

Course usage information

SW-224   Human Behavior and Social Environment IICredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): GS

This is the second course in a two-semester course sequence where students learn to use theory and empirical data to analyze human behavior as it develops in a variety of sociopolitical environments. It introduces students to a broad range of theories and perspectives relating to biological, psychological, cognitive, and social development, and race, class, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation variables.

Course usage information

SW-260   Alcohol and DrugsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: SW-105 or PY-103 or SW-205.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Addresses the special population in social work, specifically the substance abusing population. Through lecture, small group exercises, and films, the course will educate the students as to what are substance abuse and addiction, what treatment options are available, how to determine the appropriate treatment, as well as different forms of therapy and relapse-prevention work.

Course usage information

SW-261   Diagnosing Mental Health IssuesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: SW-105 or PY-103 or SW-205.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

A detailed explanation of the DSM IV and its practical use in the social work profession. Cultural applications, as well as international implications and the accurate assessment terminology, will be discussed.

Course usage information

SW-263   Family CounselingCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: SW-105 or PY-103 or SW-205.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Introduces students to the assessment and treatment of various family systems. A continuation of the ecological perspective of systems theory and social work practice illustrated in Human Behavior and the Social Environment and Social Work Practice Techniques I. Ethnic, culture, and gender issues are included as they apply to families. Family violence, substance abuse, adolescence conflict, and marital discord are among the topics discussed.

Course usage information

SW-264   AddictionsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: SW-105 or PY-103.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Addresses the addictions component of social work. Working with the clients and families to address the unbalance and dysfunction in their lives through assessment, treatment planning, and individual, group, and family therapy. Covering eating disorders, gambling, nicotine, sexual addiction, and workaholism.

Course usage information

SW-265   Creative TherapiesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: SW-105 or PY-103 or SW-205.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

With creative and interactive approaches, the students will recognize and appreciate their personal experiences to better assess the needs of their clients, as well as enhance conventional therapeutic methods. Also introduces alternate approaches to talk therapy to work with specialized client groups, such as young, traumatized, or non-verbal clients.

Course usage information

SW-266   Spirituality and Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: SW-105 or PY-103 or SW-205.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Explores spirituality as it broadly relates to the profession of social work. Holistic concepts under the definition of spirituality will be explored. The many ways spirituality can be used in social work practice settings will be discussed. Methods of spiritual practice and approaches to healing will be covered. Spirituality will be differentiated from formal religion.

Course usage information

SW-276   Administration of Gerontological ServicesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

The examination of the theory and practice of the administration of programs designed to meet the needs of older adults, with an emphasis on structure of organizations, impact of public policies and funding patterns on agencies, styles of administration, development and presentation of a budget, management of public information, and relationships with other gerontological agencies.

Course usage information

SW-278   Family ViolenceCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): None

The characteristics and dynamics of violent families. Emphasis on the issue of domestic violence as it relates to cultural values and beliefs. Myths, motivations, and linkages to substance abuse will be addressed, as well as appropriate interventions and treatment methods.

Course usage information

SW-280   Peer TutoringCredits: 1   

Prerequisite: The student must have already taken the 100- or 200-level course he or she is to be tutoring and achieved a minimum grade of "B" in the course.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Peer tutoring experience. Students will prepare course-related information for presentation to students in courses at the 100 or 200 levels. Tutors will meet weekly with a faculty supervisor and assigned students. Permission of the instructor required.

Course usage information

SW-298   Special Topics in Social Work (200 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in social work to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

SW-299   Independent Study in Social WorkCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Directed individual study of social work in areas of special interest.

Course usage information

SW-317   Racism, Sexism, and Social WelfareCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): CD, GS

Analysis of institutional racism and sexism in relation to social welfare; the nature of social work intervention with racial and ethnic minorities and women.

Course usage information

SW-325   Social Welfare Policy and Services ICredits: 3   

Prerequisite: PS-101 or PS-103.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

The values and norms that underlie social welfare services; the historical roots of current approaches to social services; the manifest and latent functions of social welfare; political and economic forces that shape social welfare policy and services.

Course usage information

SW-326   Social Welfare Policy and Services IICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: SW-325; and EN-102 or EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): WT

Dimensions of choice in social welfare policy design; eligibility for service; structures, staffing, and funding for services; theoretical material related to current developments and services in the field.

Course usage information

SW-330   Field Practice in GerontologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: SW-105 and SW-223.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Designed to provide students with an actual learning experience in an agency or organization specializing in gerontological services. Students will be supervised by a specialist in aging and will become familiar with agency functions and services serving the aging client and client's extended family. Students will observe and, later in the semester, begin to provide service under supervision. Eight hours per week in placement and a weekly seminar at the University.

Course usage information

SW-332   Gender and Sexual IdentitiesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: SO-101.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): CD, GS, SI, SJS

Draws on sociological and feminist theories of identity to question the definitions, constructions, deconstructions, ambivalences, and socially constructed nature of gender and sexual identities. In questioning such identities, this course aims at helping students understand the connections between gender and sexuality, and how those two social forces shape people's individual identities and the identities of others. The course examines how structure of race, class, gender, and sexuality, and social institutions such as family and work shape gender and sexual identities. It pays particular attention to how one's social location within power structures shapes personal identities. Also listed as SO-332.

Course usage information

SW-341   Social Work Practice with GroupsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: SW-223, passed with a grade of C or higher.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EX5

Methods and skills utilized in generalist social work practice; major methods of social work intervention with individuals, groups, and communities using case analysis and theoretical concepts. Previously listed as SW-413.

Course usage information

SW-342   Social Work Practice with Individuals and FamiliesCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: SW-105 and SW-223; both passed with a grade of C or higher.

Corequisite: SW-342L.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EX5

Methods and skills utilized in generalist social work practice; major methods of social work intervention with individuals, groups, and communities using case analysis and theoretical concepts.

Course usage information

SW-342L   Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families LabCredits: 1   

Prerequisite: SW-223.

Corequisite: SW-342.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Designed to provide students with a hands-on experience with the assessment skills and tools taught in Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families class (SW-342). Students will become familiar with videotaping equipment and will develop strong assessment skills to be used with clients in the field. For Social Work majors only.

Course usage information

SW-344   Social Work Practice with CommunitiesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: SW-224.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Examines conceptual models of community social work; development of skills to help promote social change.

Course usage information

SW-371   International Service SeminarCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: PS-101.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX5

Students will learn to unite theory and practice by studying theories and policies based on human security, and learning about their applications through service-learning projects. Students will enhance their understanding of human security by volunteering in international, community organizations and reflecting on the social, political, and economic factors and policies that affect them. Also listed as PS-371, AN-371 and SO-371.

Course usage information

SW-383   Migration and Intercultural CooperationCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, RE

Students will become familiar with issues and strategies to deal with immigrant populations effectively. Discussions will be directed towards increasing intercultural cooperation, respect for the principle of peaceful co-existence, and diversity as a strength for economic growth and societal progress. Emphasis will also be given to the theories related to ethnicity, race, culture, and geographic location of the origin of immigrant populations. Special attention will be given to the diverse issues that arise from the varied cultural backgrounds of immigrants and refugees. Students will learn skills related to culturally appropriate and tailored interventions. Experiential learning will be utilized. Prepares students using a strength-based empowerment approach to effectively utilize required resources serving the needs of diverse, immigrant populations.

Course usage information

SW-398   Special Topics in Social Work (300 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in social work to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

SW-409   Social Work Research MethodsCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Corequisite: SW-421.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): WT

Basic skills necessary for Social Work research: problem formulation, theoretical framework development, research design, methods of data collection, evaluation techniques, and data analysis.

Course usage information

SW-411   Data Analysis for Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: MA-105.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Introduction to the basic knowledge and skills necessary for the analysis of data collected or reported in social work research. Preparation for the social work practitioner to assess the adequacy of statistical procedures and to appropriately choose statistical procedures to make order out of data collected within their own research. Not open to students who have successfully completed MA-151. Limited to Social Work majors.

Course usage information

SW-412   Practice Evaluation in Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: SW-409, SW-411 or MA-151, Senior standing; and EN-101 and EN-102.

Corequisite: SW-422.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Applications of research methods to social work practice. Using skills in practice evaluation, advanced research in single-system design will be conducted.

Course usage information

SW-421   Field Practice in Social WorkCredits: 6   

Prerequisites: SW-342 and SW-344, both passed with a grade of C or higher.

Corequisite: SW-409.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EX5

Supervised experience in a social agency; direct work with individuals, groups, or communities; preparation for professional responsibility upon graduation. Sixteen hours per week in placement and a weekly seminar at the University.

Course usage information

SW-422   Advanced Field Practice in Social WorkCredits: 6   

Prerequisite: SW-421, passed with a grade of B- or higher.

Corequisite: SW-412.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EX5

Advanced field practice; direct services to individual clients, families, groups, and communities, with the possibility of administrative experiences. Sixteen hours per week in placement and a weekly seminar at the University.

Course usage information

SW-424   New Perspectives on Human SexualityCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Nine combined credits from Social Work, Sociology, Psychology or Anthropology.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Recent research and developments in the field of human sexuality focusing on individual and social problems.

Course usage information

SW-426   Seminar in Social WorkCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: SW-421 and Senior standing.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Seminar focusing on topics of particular interest to Social Work students planning to enter practice or graduate school.

Course usage information

SW-461   Culturally Diverse Child Welfare PracticesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): CD, RE

Provides an understanding of the context from which the practice of child welfare originates, examining the impact of policy upon the direct care of children at risk. Contemporary issues that face children at risk such as sexual abuse, neglect, physical abuse, poverty, and maternal substance abuse are covered, as well as recommended services and treatment that address these concerns. Public child welfare in New Jersey will be of central focus, including the impact and changes of the system's reform plan. In addition, issues of cultural diversity and cultural difference in child welfare practices and child rearing behaviors will be reviewed, with a focus on how the child welfare system could better infuse diversity of experience in policy and practice.

Course usage information

SW-498   Special Topics in Social Work (400 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in social work to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

SW-499   Independent Study in Social WorkCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: Prior permission of the directing professor and department chair.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Directed individual study of social work in areas of special interest.