Political Science and Sociology

Chair: Kenneth Mitchell, Department of Political Science and Sociology
Public Policy Program Director: Stephen J. Chapman
Sociology Program Director: Johanna Foster

Master of Arts in Public Policy (MA)

The Master of Arts in Public Policy is a thirty-credit degree program that prepares students for careers in the field of policy analysis. Career opportunities in public policy span a wide range of areas in government, nonprofit agencies, and the public and private sectors. Ideal for graduates of all disciplines, the program enhances student skills in policy analysis, overall critical thinking, effective communication, data analysis, and survey research. The program gives special emphasis to public ethics, public opinion polling, the public policy process, and practicum opportunities in public agencies. It is also designed to accommodate the lifestyles of both career professionals and full-time graduate students. Some courses are offered in a hybrid model, combining in-class seminars with online instruction. The program is primarily part-time, with opportunity for full-time study as well.

Joint Degree Program

Dual Master’s Degrees in Social Work (MSW) and Public Policy (MA-PP)

The MSW program offers interested students an opportunity to earn a second master’s degree in Public Policy (MA), after all of the MSW requirements have been completed. Students who complete the sixty-credit MSW can use up to twelve credits from the MSW courses toward the MA in Public Policy. Students who complete the Advanced Standing (thirty-credit) MSW can use up to six credits of MSW courses toward the MA in Public Policy. Please contact the School of Social Work for specific course requirements.

Stephen J. Chapman, Assistant Professor and Publc Policy Graduate Program Director (Graduate Faculty). BA, MA, East Stroudsburg, University; MA, PhD, SUNY Binghamton. Dr. Chapman specializes in American politics. His research interests include representation strategies of elected officials, the impact of continued partisan control of state governments, and public opinion. Dr. Chapman also possesses a strong research methods background and regularly teaches the undergraduate- and graduate-level methods courses.
schapman@monmouth.edu

Rekha Datta, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, MA, Presidency College, University of Calcutta, India; PhD, University of Connecticut. Specialization in political theory, international relations, comparative politics of South Asia, East Asia, the United Nations, and women and the world. Research interests focus on issues of gender and development, traditional and human security issues, and child labor. In 2003 Dr. Datta received the Distinguished Teacher of the Year Award, the highest recognition for teaching at Monmouth University. She served on the county board of the American Association for University Women as Vice President for Public Policy until 2013. Since 2013, she has served on the Board of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Monmouth and Middlesex Counties. Founder of Women and Girls’ Education (WAGE) International, a New Jersey-based 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit organization. Member of the Committee on Status of Representation and Diversity, International Studies Association. Author of: Beyond Realism: Human Security in India and Pakistan in the Twenty-First Century (2008, 2010); Why Alliances Endure: The United States-Pakistan Alliance, 1954-1971 (1994); co-editor, with Judith Kornberg, Women in Developing Countries: Assessing Strategies for Empowerment (2002). Advisor of Pi Sigma Alpha National Political Honor Society. Founder of the Institute for Global Understanding.
rdatta@monmouth.edu

Kevin Dooley, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Monmouth University; MA, PhD, Rutgers University. Research interests focus on globalization, comparativle public policy, the politics of language, and comparative European governments. In addition to a wide array of scholarly articles, he is the author/co-author of two books, Politics Still Matter: Globalization, Governance, and the Revival of Regional Minorities (2008) and Why Politics Matter: An Introduction to Political Science (2012).
kdooley@monmouth.edu

Kathryn Kloby, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty).
Vice Provost for Transformative Learning. BA, Marywood College; MS, Montclair State University; PhD, Rutgers University. Specialties are public sector accounting, performance measurement and reporting, citizen participation, public policy, and research methods. Her most current research focuses on accountability in public education.
kkloby@monmouth.edu

Nancy J Mezey, Professor (Graduate Faculty).
Associate Dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. BA, Vassar College; MA, PhD, Michigan State University. Specializes in family sociology, race-class-gender studies, gender studies, and the sociology of sexualities. Her research and publications focus on how and why diverse family forms develop out of particular social, cultural, historical, and political contexts. Outside of Monmouth University, Dr. Mezey serves as the 2014-2015 Vice President of the Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP). She also served as a volunteer in Mali, West Africa, for the Peace Corps from 1988-1990. In 2010 , she received the Monmouth University Distinguished Teacher of the Year Award.
nmezey@monmouth.edu

Kenneth Mitchell, Associate Professor and Chair (Graduate Faculty). BA, University of California; MS, London School of Economics; DPhi, Oxford University, United Kingdom. Specializes in Latin-American and Caribbean politics and policy (public sector reform, democratization, and state-society relations); and international political economy (capacity building in public sector, community development, and politics of market-based reform). Authored: State-Society Relations in Mexico (2001); “Don’t’ Cry for Argentina, They Will Survive This” (2014); “Models of Clientelism and Policy Change: the Case of conditional Cash Transfer Programmes in Mexico and Brazil” (co-authored with Aaron Ansell, 2011); “An Institutional Anomaly, Longevity and Competition in the Dominican Party System” (2009); “Bridging the Convergence-Divergence Policy Diffusion Divide, Mid-range Theorizing and Devolving Food Aid in Mexico and the Dominican Republic” (2007); “Building State Capacity: Reforming Mexican State Food Aid Programs in the 1990’s” (2005). In 2015, he received the Monmouth University Distinguished Teacher of the Year Award.
kmitchel@monmouth.edu

Saliba Sarsar, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Monmouth University (Monmouth College);PhD, Rutgers University. Specialties are international relations, comparative government (Middle East), and American foreign policy. He is the co-author of two books: Ideology, Values, and Technology in Political Life (1994) and World Politics: An Interdisciplinary Perspective (1995); the editor of two books: Education for Leadership and Social Responsibility (1996) and Palestine and the Quest for Peace (2009); and the co-editor of three books: Principles and Pragmatism – Key Documents from the American Task Force on Palestine (2006), Patriarch Michel Sabbah – Faithful Witness: On Reconciliation and Peace in the Holy Land (2009), and Democracy in Africa: Political Changes and Challenges (2012). He guest edited a special issue of the International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society (2004), focusing on Palestinian-Israeli relations. Dr. Sarsar’s articles have appeared in Peace and Conflict Studies; Holy Land Studies; Palestine-Israel Journal of Politics; Economics and Culture; This Week in Palestine; Columbia University Middle East Studies Internet Resources; Clio’s Psyche; Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice; Middle East Quarterly; Jerusalem Quarterly File; Scandinavian Journal of Development Alternatives and Area Studies; Journal of South Asian and Middle East Studies; International Journal of Leadership; Journal of Leadership Studies; and Leadership and Organization Development Journal. Dr. Sarsar also has two published books of poetry: Crosswinds (1999) and Seven Gates of Jerusalem (2010). A third book of poetry, Portraits: Poems of the Holy Land, is awaiting publication.
sarsar@monmouth.edu

Course usage information

PS-CPE   Public Policy Comprehensive ExamCredits: None   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Public Policy Comprehensive Exam. This is a pass/fail course. PS-510, PS-515, PS-516, and PS-518.

Course usage information

PS-510   Policy AnalysisCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): TPS

An overview of the field of public policy studies with particular attention paid to the role of the policy analyst in the field of public policy. This course provides a solid foundation for the study of public policy analysis by concentrating on the five stages of the policy process, including agenda setting, policy formulation, budgeting, policy implementation, and policy evaluation.

Course usage information

PS-514   Public Opinion and PollingCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Students are taught how to use social science research methods to critique and create polling surveys. Particular attention is paid to the data collection and sample design, survey research methods, questionnaire development, and data collection and analysis. Students are taught how to evaluate the quality of survey research methods. Students will also be expected to design, implement, and analyze an original polling survey.

Course usage information

PS-515   Public Policy Research DesignCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Introduces students to the different research techniques widely practiced in the field of public policy. Students will learn about the research process, from conceptualization to operationalization and measurement. Students examine the importance of writing the literature review and articulating the research question; explore various research designs such as experiments, survey research, and other methods for collecting data. Other issues such as sampling, validity, and reliability are addressed. Class discussions, exercises, readings, and other materials will equip students with the skills to design a piece of policy research to, for example, assess policy proposals, and programs.

Course usage information

PS-516   Research MethodsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Introduces students to widely used analytical and data presentation techniques in the field of public policy. Students will explore descriptive and inferential statistics. Using Excel and Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, students learn how to build a data set, how to acquire secondary data, and how to clean and analyze data. Students will learn about distributions and how to interpret findings. Determining whether research findings are capable of making inferences is examined through regression analysis. Data presentation techniques are addressed to strengthen the skills of students to translate quantitative information to a broad audience.

Course usage information

PS-518   Theory, Policy, EthicsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Seeks to enable students to develop a critical understanding of the moral and political values that come into play in public policy. Topics include the tensions between ethics and politics in the tradition of political theory as well as how they feature in contemporary public policy debates in American and global politics. Students gain an understanding of the role of ethics as a matter of social justice as well as ethical issues and dilemmas in professional ethics.

Course usage information

PS-522   History of Urbanization in AmericaCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Provides an interdisciplinary study of the history of urbanization and industrialization in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century. Using the themes of community, technology, public policy, and immigration, students will examine the development and changes in the social, physical, political, and economic urban landscape. Also listed as HS-522.

Course usage information

PS-524   Public Opinion and the MediaCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An examination of the shifting nature of public opinion, the agenda-setting role of mass media, and the survey methods that are employed to determine public opinion. The practices, values, and traditions of journalism that impact public opinion. Experience with the conduct of a survey and analysis of case studies.

Course usage information

PS-525   Political CommunicationCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The study of traditional and contemporary theories of rhetoric as applied in research and analysis of political campaigns. The rhetorical creation, maintenance, application, and legitimization of symbolic power. A survey of analytic models of political communication and application of the models to case studies. The role of the political communication specialist. Practicum in political communication strategies and techniques. Also listed as CO-525.

Course usage information

PS-530   Environmental PolicyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A survey of the process by which environmental politics, planning, and public policy is conducted in the United States and around the world. We will examine the nature and scope of environmental, energy, and natural resource problems; contrasting perspectives on their severity and policy implications; the goals and strategies of the environmental movement and public opinion on the environment; scientific, economic, political, and institutional forces that shape policymaking and implementation; approaches to environmental policy analysis; and selected issues in environmental policy in the global community. In addition to the covering of certain ecological science terms, the interplay between international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and traditional states and the ways in which these actors seek diplomatic solutions to environmental problems is also covered.

Course usage information

PS-533   The History of Public Policy in the United StatesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSUS

The objective is to survey major issues in domestic public policy. The emphasis is on changes in the process of policy formation in both the public and private sectors. Also listed as HS-533.

Course usage information

PS-553   Gender, Family, and PolicyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Examines how policies affect a diverse spectrum of families based on class, race, gender, sexuality, age, and nationality. It begins with a historical perspective on how families have developed because of historical factors such as changing economy and technology. It also examines how social structures such as race, class, gender, and sexuality have shaped families. It then focuses on current issues facing families and the policies that regulate those issues, such as the balance between work and family, welfare, reproductive issues, violence, healthcare, and educational issues. A comparative approach will be taken to examine policies both in the U.S. and within other countries. Also discussed will be family activism aimed at affecting policy in the U.S.

Course usage information

PS-563   Global Policies and IssuesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Adopting an interdisciplinary perspective, this course looks at the positive and negative effects of globalization. It also explores the national and international aspects of major global policies and issues that shape the interdependent world of the twenty-first century.

Course usage information

PS-566   Comparative Public PolicyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

In the world in which terrorism and chaos threaten to upset the policy-making capabilities of state governments, it is vital that we understand the different ways that nations formulate and implement public policy. Through an extensive investigation of policy analysis across a broad spectrum of states, the student will be able to better understand the reasons for policy decisions around the world. Democratic governments will be compared and contrasted to non-democratic governments in an attempt to provide greater insight and answer questions of health, economic, environmental, and foreign policies.

Course usage information

PS-583   The Causes of WarCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A critical analysis of the general and recurring problems of war in human life; the course probes the direct and indirect causes of war by employing various analytical methods developed in political science as well as in sister disciplines of the social sciences.

Course usage information

PS-585   American Foreign PolicyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Examines, analyzes, and evaluates the many dimensions and issues of American foreign policy since 1945. It provides an interpretative framework within which the sources of American action abroad may be understood. Combines descriptive and explanatory material with empirical evidence and makes a serious effort to distinguish facts from inferences, hypotheses, and opinions. The post-Cold War and post-9/11 worlds are assessed, with a focus on American goals, capabilities, and relationships around the world.

Course usage information

PS-595   Political Science PracticumCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An opportunity to apply classroom theory in practice through actual work experience. Students have the opportunity to apply the theories and concepts of public policy to actual work settings.

Course usage information

PS-597   PortfolioCredits: None   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Enables students to complete their portfolios for the Master of Arts in Public Policy (MAPP). The portfolio displays academic and professional development and learning gained from the MAPP program and related experiences. The portfolio contains collections of academic and professional goal statements, term papers, reflective essays and artifacts gathered in various classes and colloquiums and connected work.

Course usage information

PS-598   Special Topics/Special ProjectsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Offered occasionally to match the interest of the students' and the professor teaching the course. The instruction will follow classroom lectures and discussions on the topic. The exact nature of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated on the student's transcript. Permission of program director required.

Course usage information

PS-599   Readings and ResearchCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An independent research study based on relevant research and the writing of a substantial paper designed and executed by the student in consultation with a supervising professor. The subject matter should cover public policy and related areas.

Course usage information

PS-618   Social Work AdministrationCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): TPS

Designed to deepen the student's knowledge of the information and skills needed to organize and manage a modern human service not-for-profit organization. Except for those in private practice, most social workers function within an organization or agency environment - very often in the not-for-profit sector. Within five years, many holding MSW degrees will hold management positions in those organizations. Allows students to gain some preparation for this future possibility, while at the same time providing them with the tools to understand administrative processes in their organizations. Also listed as SW-618.

Course usage information

PS-692   Public Policy Master's ThesisCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: PS-515 and PS-516.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Students have the option of completing the comprehensive exam or thesis to satisfy the program requirements. With the thesis, students design and implement an original research project. Students will select and work with a first and second reader from among graduate program or affiliated faculty. The thesis involves writing the literature review, developing data collection instruments, data collection and presentation of results. Results are presented at a thesis defense organized by the program director.

Course usage information

SO-505   Critical Issues in Crime and DelinquencyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An overview of some of the major problems confronting criminology and the criminal and juvenile justice systems. Current criminological literature and research will be evaluated in terms of its ability to suggest solutions to these problems.