English

Chair: Susan Goulding, Department of English
Director of First Year Composition: David Tietge
Undergraduate Program Coordinator: Elizabeth Gilmartin
Graduate Program Director: Kristin Bluemel

Master of Arts in English (MA)

The Master of Arts in English is a flexible program that allows various types of students to pursue a course of study meeting their own interests and goals. For those interested in the challenge of graduate study and considering going on to an MFA or PhD program at another institution, the courses at Monmouth provide a broad education in English literature, creative writing, and rhetoric, and a sound foundation for further graduate study. Secondary school teachers can fulfill their continuing education requirement and accrue credits toward salary increases by taking courses in the program. Those interested in personal enrichment or career advancement will find that the program requirements improve creative and critical thinking abilities along with reading, speaking, and writing skills. The curriculum, appropriate for recent college graduates as well as returning students, is designed to allow students to finish the degree in two to two-and-a-half years by taking two to three courses per semester, with the additional option of summer study. Part-time students are also welcome to attend. Course offerings allow students to take courses in a variety of fields to obtain a broad knowledge of literature in English or to focus on areas of specific interest.

Mary Kate Azcuy, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). BS, Monmouth University; MA, New York University; PhD, Drew University. Specialty is contemporary American literature with an emphasis on women poets, mythology, and feminism, as well as creative writing.
mazcuy@monmouth.edu

Kristin Bluemel, Professor and English Graduate Program Director (Graduate Faculty). BA, Wesleyan University; MA, PhD, Rutgers University. Specialty is twentieth-century British literature. Additional interests include literary criticism and theory, the novel, children’s literature, World War II and the end of empire, and book history.
kbluemel@monmouth.edu

Heide Estes, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, University of Pennsylvania; PhD, New York University. Specialty is Old English language and literature, and additional interests include Middle English literature, feminist theory, and representations of Jews in early English texts. Current research is in ecocriticism.
hestes@monmouth.edu

Melissa Febos, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). MFA, Sarah Lawrence College. Specialty is creative nonfiction, with additional interests in fiction, poetry, contemporary American literature, and women’s studies.
mfebos@monmouth.edu

Alex Gilvarry, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). MFA, Hunter College. Specialty is creative writing, fiction.
agilvarr@monmouth.edu

Susan M Goulding, Associate Professor and Chair (Graduate Faculty). BA, MA, Adelphi University; PhD, New York University. Specialties are eighteenth-century British literature, women’s studies, British history, and reception history.
goulding@monmouth.edu

Alena Graedon, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). MFA, Columbia School of the Arts. Specialty is creative writing, fiction, with an emphasis on speculative fiction.

John P. Hanly, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Georgetown College; MA, University of Chicago; PhD, University of Louisville. Areas of specialty include composition theory and ethics.
jphanly@monmouth.edu

Jeffrey Jackson, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). PhD, Rice University. Areas of specialty include nineteenth-century British Romantic and Victorian literature.
jejackso@monmouth.edu

Mihaela Moscaliuc, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, MA, Al.l. Cuza University; MA, Salisbury University; MFA, New England College; PhD, University of Maryland. Areas of specialty include immigrant literature, postcolonial studies, translational studies, and poetry writing.
mmoscali@monmouth.edu

David Tietge, Associate Professor and Director of First Year Composition (Graduate Faculty). BA, University of Northern Iowa; MA, Indiana State University; PhD, South Illinois University of Carbondale. Areas of interest include rhetoric and composition, literary theory, rhetorical theory, and popular culture. Current research is in science rhetoric.
dtietge@monmouth.edu

Lisa Vetere, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Siena College; MA, St. Bonaventrue University; PhD, Lehigh University. Specialty is Antebellum American literature and culture, with an emphasis on cultural studies and feminist and psychoanalytical theory.
lvetere@monmouth.edu

Michael G. Waters, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, MA, State University of New York; MFA, University of Iowa; PhD, Ohio University. Specialties are creative writing, poetry, and American Literture.
mgwaters@monmouth.edu

Courtney Werner, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Moravian College and Theological Seminary; MA, Texas State University; PhD, Kent State University. Specialities are composition and rhetoric, new media, and multi-modal learning.
cwerner@monmouth.edu

Kenneth Womack, Professor (Graduate Faculty).
Dean, School of Humanities and Social Sciences. BA, Texas AM University; MA, Texas AM University/Moscow Institute of Communication, U.S.S.R.; PhD, Northern Illinois University. Dr. Womack's areas of professional interest include the Beatles, twentieth-century British literature, and creative writing. He serves as Editor of Interdisciplinary Literary Studies: A Journal of Criticism and Theory, published by Penn State University Press, and Co-Editor of the English Association's Year's Work in English Studies, published by Oxford University Press.
kwomack@monmouth.edu

Course usage information

EN-ESS   English Master's EssayCredits: None   

Prerequisites: Completion of twenty-one credits and a minimum GPA of 3.00. Students may register for Master's Essay (EN-ESS) in a summer session if their Essay advisor is agreeable.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A revision and development of a graduate paper researched and written in a previous semester. Typical length 20-25 pages. Only for students in the Literature or Rhetoric and Writing Concentrations who are not writing a thesis. This is a pass/fail course.

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EN-500   Critical TheoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.4, EN.RW

Introduction to a variety of critical approaches to literature. Theories will be applied to texts: poetry, fiction, and drama, and the interpretation developed from these theories will be considered.

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EN-502   Seminar in Literary ResearchCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Methods and materials for composing and presenting graduate research centered upon selected texts chosen by the instructor; bibliography, reference resources, critical analysis, and evaluation of sources; techniques, forms and formats for research projects and papers.

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EN-509   Middle English LiteratureCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EN.1, EN.LT

Study of selected works from the twelfth through the fifteenth centuries in the context of contemporary cultural and literary developments.

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EN-511   The English RenaissanceCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EN.1, EN.LT

Intensive study of the major genres and authors of English literature from 1550-1660, the age of Spenser, Johnson and Milton. Lyric and epic poetry, drama, prose fiction, and the essay are represented.

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EN-513   Shakespeare, His Contemporaries and Renaissance SocietyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.1, EN.LT

Study of selected Shakespeare plays along with works by Marlowe, Webster and others in order to place Shakespeare's achievement within aesthetic, critical and historical contexts.

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EN-525   Eighteenth Century British LiteratureCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.1, EN.LT

Intensive study of selected works of prose, poetry, and drama, which represent the Ages of Dryden, Pope, Johnson, and Hume.

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EN-528   Foundations of World LiteratureCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EN.3, EN.LT

The oral and written traditions of the foundation of the non-Western world: Africa, the African Diaspora, Asia and the Middle East.

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EN-530   Contemporary World LiteratureCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EN.3, EN.LT

Major literary texts from three broad areas of the non-Western world (African Diaspora, Asia, and the Middle East) will be critically examined, including literary trends, theories, and criticism. Selections will be drawn from poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama.

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EN-533   Literature of ImmigrationCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EN.3, EN.LT

Examines literature written by the first or second generation immigrants, about the experiences of emigration and immigration to North America; it combines close analysis with historical contextualization, and includes discussion of critical and theoretical works on immigrant identities and subjectivities. Focuses on narratives of immigration from areas outside Western Europe.

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EN-535   The Novel in EnglishCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EN.2, EN.LT

The development of long prose fiction from the eighteenth century to the present with consideration of criticism that defines the novel as a genre.

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EN-537   British RomanticismCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.2, EN.LT

Investigation of British Romanticism as a self-consciously defined movement in literature. Will also consider how "Romanticisms" have been read and defined historically.

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EN-538   Victorian NovelCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EN.2, EN.LT

Through a close thematic and formal analysis, this course will study how British Victorian novels responded to the momentous social, political and intellectual changes of their time.

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EN-540   Modernism in Britain and IrelandCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): EN.2, EN.LT

Study of British and Irish modernism in the context of twentieth-century culture and history.

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EN-541   UtopiasCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EN.LT

The significance of utopian proposals and attempts to create utopian communities in the history of ideas. From the utopias of Plato and More to dystopian visions of the Brave New World to 1984 and science fiction as a utopian genre.

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EN-542   Contemporary American/British LiteratureCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EN.2, EN.LT

This course will explore American and/or British literature written in English from the "contemporary" period. These works will be critically examined via close readings and discussions within a literary, historical, cultural, and/or theoretical framework.

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EN-544   Irish Literary StudiesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.2, EN.LT

Ireland's literary tradition in English from the eighteenth-century to today. Different semesters may focus on a particular period, genre or theme within Irish literature, such as Irish drama, the eighteenth century tradition, W.B. Yeats and his circle or James Joyce and Irish Modernism.

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EN-546   Historical Persuasion and ArgumentationCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EN.4, EN.RW

Examines important texts in the history of persuasion and argumentation. Covers the era when Rhetoric - the study and practice of persuasion and argumentation - was one of the fundamental disciplines (the "Trivium") that every educated person had to learn.

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EN-547   Definitions of Contemporary RhetoricCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.4, EN.RW

Examines the use of language in a number of key spheres of human communication with the ultimate objective of constructing a usable definition of modern rhetoric. Work in the course is especially concerned with defining more precisely the boundaries of contemporary rhetoric and language theories to gain a deeper understanding of the richness and dangers of language in our own written expression.

Course usage information

EN-548   Rhetoric of Science and SocietyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EN.4, EN.RW

Examination of how language-using agents (corporate, governmental, educational, journalistic, and scientific) outside the activities of a professional scientific community (and sometimes within it) rely on the dominance and force of scientific language and its symbol systems to influence the society we live in.

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EN-550   Feminist Theory and CriticismCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EN.4, EN.RW

Examines the theories and strategies developed and used by feminist theorists and literary critics to explore a range of visual and written texts. Includes focus on gender-related experiences in literature and culture.

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EN-558   Teaching CompositionCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.RW, EN.4

The scholarship and methods of teaching composition with a focus on the collaboration experience of the writing process, one-on-one conferencing, and integration of language skills.

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EN-560   Early American LiteratureCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.1, EN.LT

The development of American literature in various genres through the Colonial, Revolutionary War, and Early Republic periods.

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EN-561   Nineteenth Century American LiteratureCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.2, EN.LT

Major works of American literature from 1830 to World War I will be critically examined to place them in their literary context and discover the techniques used by their authors.

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EN-563   Linguistics and the English LanguageCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.4, EN.RW

Includes grounding in the structural aspects of general linguistics: morphology, syntax, semantics, phonology, and pragmatics. Examines the structure of the English language, including nouns and noun classes, ways of talking about actions and states, how ideas are combined into complex sentences, and how context and purpose affect how we use language. Also considers differences between learning a first and second language.

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EN-565   New Jersey's Literary HeritageCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EN.2, EN.LT

The development of New Jersey's literary heritage in various genres from the Colonial period to the present, through analyses of representative works from different regions of the state, with emphasis on their local significance and their relationship to national literary trends.

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EN-571   Modern American LiteratureCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EN.2, EN.LT

Major works of American literature written between 1910 and 1945 will be critically examined and placed within a literary context in order to discuss techniques used by their authors.

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EN-581   Women in LiteratureCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EN.LT

Investigates the role of women in literature as writers, readers and subjects. Includes theoretical consideration of gender. Topics vary by semester.

Course usage information

EN-598   Special Topics in EnglishCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The subject matter varies with the interest of the students and of the professor teaching the course. The exact nature of the topic covered in any given semester is indicated in the student's transcript.

Course usage information

EN-599   Independent Study in EnglishCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Prior permission of the directing professor and department chair.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Reading and research under the direction of a member of the English faculty. A minimum of six, face-to-face meetings are required; bi-weekly meetings are the norm.

Course usage information

EN-607   Seminar in Creative Writing: Non-FictionCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EN.CW, EN.RW

Students will analyze, in a workshop setting, readings in creative non-fiction to understand and become aware of the variant forms, techniques, and approaches used. As workshop participants, students will write and analyze their own creative nonfiction pieces. This course may be retaken for credit.

Course usage information

EN-609   Seminar in Creative Writing: PoetryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.CW

Students analyze in a workshop setting readings in contemporary poetry to observe techniques in craft, and present their own poetry for intensive examination by workshop participants. The course may be retaken for credit.

Course usage information

EN-611   Seminar in Creative Writing: FictionCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EN.CW

Students will analyze in a workshop setting readings in both American and World fiction to observe techniques in craft and present their own short stories for intensive examination by workshop participants. This course may be retaken for credit.

Course usage information

EN-613   Seminar in Creative Writing: PlaywritingCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.CW

In a workshop format, students will write, critique and perform stage readings of their classmates' plays. This course may be retaken for credit.

Course usage information

EN-615   Seminar in Creative Writing: Writer's CraftCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.CW

An in-depth study of the creative writing process. Students may develop a craft workbook that focuses on both traditional and contemporary literary forms and strategies. Students write by assignment and develop techniques of reviewing in order to compare and contrast major authors' aesthetics with their own creative gestures. This course may be retaken for credit.

Course usage information

EN-617   Advanced Academic WritingCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EN.RW

Designed for the graduate student interested in sharpening his or her writing skills for the purpose of developing publication-quality articles. Content and assignments are structured in such a way as to provide practice in accelerated academic prose and, ideally, to produce a publication-quality article by the end of the course. Taught in a lecture/discussion and workshop format.

Course usage information

EN-619   Writing and the World Wide WebCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EN.RW, EN.4

A study of theories and concepts of writing and rhetoric in digital media with emphasis on the uses of verbal and visual media in digital spaces, such as Web sites, blogs, and wikis. Topics examined include authorship, narrative, and multimedia participation, design, and creation.

Course usage information

EN-644   Manuscript SeminarCredits: 3-6   

Prerequisites: Completion of 21 credits with a minimum GPA of 3.00 and a minimum of 6 credits in course type EN.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Completion of a single-genre manuscript under the direction of a first reader who is a member of the English Graduate faculty, in consultation with a second reader, who is a full-time faculty member. A minimum of six face-to-face meetings are required; bi-weekly meetings are the norm. The manuscript will consist of at least forty pages of poetry or prose, or approximately eighty pages of drama, half of which may be work begun in previous graduate creative writing courses and substantially revised for this course. The manuscript will include a three to five-page Introduction. In addition, a twenty-item annotated bibliography of at least twenty pages must be submitted. Once the manuscript has been judged as satisfactory by both readers, the Graduate Program will schedule an oral defense to be attended by both readers as well as the Graduate Program Director. This is a pass/fail course. CW.

Course usage information

EN-691   English Thesis DevelopmentCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Completion of twelve credits and a minimum GPA of 3.00. A student who wishes to complete Thesis Development in Summer must register in Session C, and then only with a Thesis Advisor in residence for the majority of the term and with permission of the Graduate Program Director.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive and rigorous study of an author, topic, or theme developed under the direction of and evaluated by a thesis advisor who is a member of the English Graduate faculty in consultation with another full-time faculty member. A minimum of six face-to-face meetings are required; bi-weekly meetings are the norm. The thesis may be based upon a paper completed in a course taken in a previous semester and further developed under the direction of the professor in that course. By the end of the semester, students will submit a twenty-five item annotated bibliography and a ten-page review of recent scholarship.

Course usage information

EN-692   English Thesis WritingCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Thesis Development EN-691, completion of twenty-one credits, and a minimum GPA of 3.00. Students may not register for Thesis Writing EN-692 in a summer session.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Completion of the writing of the thesis under the continuing direction of a thesis advisor who is a member of the English Graduate faculty. A minimum of six face-to-face meetings are required; bi-weekly meetings are the norm. The thesis must comprise of between thirty and sixty pages (not including works cited) and will be evaluated by the thesis advisor in consultation with another full-time faculty member. Once the thesis has been judged as satisfactory by both readers, the Graduate Program will schedule an oral defense to be attended by both readers as well as the Graduate Program Director.