Anthropology

Chair: Richard Veit, Department of History and Anthropology

Master of Arts in Anthropolgy (MA)

The Master of Arts in Anthropology provides students with the necessary credentials to fulfill a variety of professional and academic goals. For students interested in archeology, their training and degree will prepare them for full-time supervisory-level employment in archaeology, cultural resource management, historic preservation, and geographic information systems (GIS). Students interested in social policy, teaching, public relations, and local community engagement will receive training in qualitative research and other conceptual tools of cultural anthropology that prepare them for work in culturally unfamiliar and diverse situations.  Students planning to continue for a PhD will receive a well-grounded education in theory and methods taught by well-published faculty. Students in the program complete thirty credit hours of course work. Of the thirty credits for the program, six may be transferred from another institution.

Veronica Davidov, Assistant Professor and Anthropology Graduate Program Director (Graduate Faculty). PhD, New York University. Areas of research interest include cultures of Latin America and ecotourism in the Amazon. Teaching focus includes anthropological theory, ethnographic methods, area studies (Latin American), political ecology, and globalization.
vdavidov@monmouth.edu

Hillary DelPrete, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BS, Tulane University; MA, PhD, Rutgers University. Professor DelPrete is a biological anthropologist with a specialization in modern evolution. Teaching and research interests include human evolution, human variation, human behavioral ecology, and anthropometrics.
hdelpret@monmouth.edu

Stanton M. Green, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, New York University; MA, PhD, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Professor Green is a specialist in Baseball and American Culture, Archaeology, and Ireland. His research and teaching interests include questions of diversity in the United States, archeological methods and theory, and the application of Geographic Information Systems.
sgreen@monmouth.edu

Richard F. Veit, Professor and Chair (Graduate Faculty). BA, Drew University; MA, College of William and Mary; PhD, University of Pennsylvania. Teaching areas include archaeology, historic preservation, North American Indians, and New Jersey history. Research interests include historical archaeology, industrial archaeology, and early American Material Culture. Author of Digging New Jersey’s Past: Historical Archaeology in the Garden State.
rveit@monmouth.edu

Course usage information

AN-CPE   Anthropology Comprehensive ExamCredits: None   

Prerequisite: Thirty graduate credits in Anthropology.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The Anthropology comprehensive exam is a zero- credit course for students, which will allow students who have completed thirty credits of graduate coursework in anthropology to take a comprehensive exam and complete their degree. This is a pass/fail course.

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AN-THD   Thesis DefenseCredits: None   

Prerequisites: AN-691 and AN-692.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A zero-credit course that is taken after completing AN-691 and AN-692. It consists of a public presentation of the student's completed thesis research. This is a pass/fail course.

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AN-501   Anthropological TheoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

A seminar-style course that presents students with a survey of the theories that have shaped the thinking of anthropologists for over a century. We cover theories relevant to all four subfields of anthropology (cultural, archaeological, linguistic, and biological), and compare them through a very general set of questions. The five questions asked are 1) How does society hold itself together? (structure); 2)How does society change?(history); 3) How aware are people of their society and its changes?(subjectivity); 4) How are people able to change their society? (agency); and 5) How do people divide society into groups?(alterity).

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AN-502   Seminar in Biological AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): None

Designed to provide graduate students with a foundation in the core principles of biological anthropology. We will examine both theoretical issues and empirical evidence in order to better understand evolution of the human species. Topics that will be explored in this course include evolutionary theory, primatology, paleoanthropology and human variation. In addition, this course will examine contemporary issues in human bio-cultural evolution.

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AN-503   Archaeological TheoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Focuses on theoretical issues, past and present, concerning the nature and explanation of culture, cultural reproduction and transformation through time, and the central role of materiality in those processes. As anthropological archaeology, the course is premised on the relationship of archaeology to anthropology and other socio-historical sciences. We will examine the development of archaeology as an academic discipline, the role of theory in interpretation of archaeological materials, and the key concepts of culture and time. The course will examine specific theoretical approaches including culture history, neo-evolutionary-functionalist-ecological approaches, neo-Marxist and materialist perspectives, processualism and postprocessualism, interaction theories (e.g., world systems theory), and contemporary approaches. These include practice/agency, contextual approaches, and other multivocal, feminist, and postcolonial theories of identity-formation in the past. The course will appeal to a wide range of social scientists, and particularly archaeologists, sociocultural anthropologists, and other disciplines working on issues of representation(e.g., museum professionals).

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AN-504   Ancient Civilizations of Native AmericaCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): HSNW

Cultural developments in Mesoamerica and the Central Andes, from the development of agriculture to the Spanish conquest, focusing on Inca and Aztec civilizations; theoretical exploration of developmental similarities between the two regions.

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AN-506   Historical ArchaeologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSUS

An intensive introduction to historical and industrial archeology (c. 1492+). Topics covered include exploration, imperialism, colonization, industrialization, and urbanism. Archeological field methods and the interpretation of material culture are also introduced. Also listed as HS-506.

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AN-513   Origin of Civilization and the StateCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Evolution of the ancient civilizations in China, Peru, Mexico, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and Egypt. Emphasis on the causal processes underlying the development of these societies.

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AN-520   Field Methods in ArchaeologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An introduction to archaeological field methods: survey and excavation. Students will also learn excavation procedures, descriptive note writing, and drawing, and be introduced to archaeological photography, mapping, reporting, conservation, and curation. Supervised fieldwork will be conducted on archaeological sites. Also listed as HS-520.

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AN-522   Ethnographic MethodsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

An overview of ethnographic research design and methods employed in anthropology. Students will practice research design and methods, data analysis, and write-up techniques. Students will engage questions of ethics through research practice and theoretical discussion.

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AN-524   Introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS)Credits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): TL

Provides both the theoretical and methodological background for proficient use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS). A multidisciplinary integration of theories and applications pertinent to both natural and social science research. Lectures and discussions will introduce the conceptual and methodological platform that is necessary to design, implement, and interpret GIS research. Weekly lab exercises will develop problem-solving skills and emphasize common research techniques in GIS. Students will also learn field techniques of spatial data collection. In sum, demonstrates how both GIS tools and a geographic perspective may be applied to a broad range of social and ecological research problems. Also listed as GO-524.

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AN-532   Native American History and PrehistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSNW, HSWLD

Examines North America's native people in the area north of the Rio Grande. It combines North American prehistory with a historical overview of Native American experiences since contact. Evidence from archaeology, oral histories, and written sources are all presented. Challenges facing modern Native Americans are also examined. Also listed as HS-532.

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AN-540   Psychological AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An introduction to the subfield of psychological anthropology. Research and inquiry in psychological anthropology is rooted in two traditions. The first is culture and personality which is aligned with psychoanalytical thought; the second is cognitive anthropology which emphasizes cultural models of thought. A fundamental pursuit in psychological anthropology is the relationship between culture, behavior, and thought. Psychological anthropology seeks to understand the relationship between individual and sociocultural phenomena - between polar extremes such as personality and mind and society and culture. Explores how culture and psyche affect each other. Topics include: theoretical frameworks; culture and personality, human development, emotion, self, and mental illness.

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AN-542   Economic AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Examines human systems of production, distribution and consumption around the world - in short, cross-cultural economics. We consider how various economic systems differ from market capitalism, and therefore also analyze how capitalism itself operates on its periphery. We analyze the processes through which markets and money spread throughout the world, as well as their (often violent) interaction with local economic systems. As such, this inquiry raised fundamental questions about social inequality that we explore throughout the course, such as: Why are some people poor and others rich? How do people in different contexts understand these differences? How do economic disparities affect human desire, value, morality and choice?

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AN-555   Ancient TechnologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Provides an introduction to ancient technology/experimental archaeology. It examines the major theories and practices employed by experimental archaeologists. Students will develop skills in traditional technologies, e.g. flintknapping, pot firing, blacksmithing, and timber frame house construction.

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AN-562   History of Maps and MappingCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Students will study the historical developments in cartographic technique, the development of mapping in different parts of the world, and the future of mapping in the computer age. Students will focus on the ways the events and ideology of a time period influence maps and mapping, and how in turn mapping influences history and ideology. Also listed as HS-562.

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AN-563   The AmazonCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

An anthropological seminar focused on the Amazon region, with emphasis on how expert and lay knowledge about the Amazon has been produced and circulated.

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AN-572   The History of TourismCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSWLD

Students will study the history of tourism in different parts of the world from political, social, cultural, geographic, and economic perspectives. This will include an examination of historical differences in tourist attractions, tourist behaviors, and impacts on tourist destinations and their people. Students will also study how historical memory and interpretation shapes the contemporary tourist experience, as well as questions concerning authenticity and tourism. Also listed as HS-572.

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AN-573   Ecological ImperialismCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSWLD

Ecological History will examine the relationship between human society(ies) and the natural world over recorded time. As an interdisciplinary exercise this class will draw on the natural sciences, anthropology, and history to better understand the biological, cultural, imperial, ethical, economic, religious, political, and global ramifications of the relationship between humanity and humanity's "natural" surroundings. Also listed as HS-573.

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AN-575   Civilizations of the AndesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSNW, HSWLD

A survey of Andean history from the beginning of human settlement through the Inca Empire and the Spanish conquest to contemporary peasant society. The evolution and nature of pre-Columbian civilizations, focusing on Chavin, Paracas-Nazca, Huari-Tiahuanaco, Chimor, and the Inca; the social and political organization of the Inca empire; the Spanish conquest and its impact on native culture; contemporary social changes; and rural migration and the transformation of contemporary Andean society. Theoretical exploration of the developmental trajectory of Andean civilization. Also listed as HS-575.

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AN-582   Applied AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Applied Anthropology is anthropology put to use - meaning using anthropological research and methods to solve practical problems. This is an advanced level survey course that pays attention to cultural viewpoints, methods and results. While exploring different areas of applied anthropology through the history of the discipline and contemporary research projects, we will study methods unique to this subfield. Practical information, advice and resource on career preparation and development will be offered. By the end of the course, students should be able to answer the question "How can I use anthropology in my future career?"

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AN-585   Seminar in African HistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSNW

Analysis and appraisal of colonialism in Africa, reflecting on the political, economic, and sociocultural transformations, that occurred in Africa between 1880 and 1960. Also listed as HS-585.

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AN-586   Pre-Columbian Civilizations: The Aztec and Inka StatesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive examination of the emergence, growth, and conquest of two native states from the ancient Americas: the Inka and the Aztec. Lectures and discussions examine the social, cultural, and political contexts of these two Native Americanstates, while applying broader anthropological theories of state genesis, power apparatuses, and social transformation. Considers the causes and consequences of the Spanish and Portuguese conquests within the Americas through an intensive discussion of the establishment of colonial societies in the sixteenth century. Also will examine how the pre-Columbian and colonial history of this region are intimately linked to the contemporary politics of Latin American nations.

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AN-587   Visual AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Deals with the aspects of visuality in culture and anthropology. A significant part of the course will be devoted to visual anthropology. We will learn about the development of visual anthropology as a discipline, the particular problems and challenges involved in practicing this type of ethnography, the evolution of ideas about accountability, representation, reflexivity and positioning in visual ethnographic methods. We will start with exploring the role of image in anthropology by considering the relationship between photography and ethnography, and continue to study ethnographic filmmaking, from Robert Flaherty's "Nanook of the North," (considered to be the first ethnographic documentary), to the development of Cinema Verite, to the emergence of indigenous media. Students will gain a nuanced understanding of the subject through weekly writing exercises, presentations, and in-class discussion. For a final project, students will write a long-form paper that will combine original research and visual analysis.

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AN-595   Anthropology Internship/PracticumCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Provides graduate students with the opportunity to gain substantive career experience and build specific applied skills by working in outside programs, institutions, agencies, and firms engaged in the fields of anthropology, museum studies, public history, and geography.

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AN-598   Special Topics in AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Allows students to study a specific aspect of anthropology. The subject matter varies from semester to semester, and depends on the professor who teaches the course.

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AN-599   Independent Study in AnthropologyCredits: 1-3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Reading and research leading to significant written work under the direction of a member of the anthropology faculty.

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AN-691   Anthropology Thesis (Research)Credits: 3   

Prerequisite: Fifteen credits in Anthropology.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Reading and research leading to significant written work, under the direction of a member of the anthropology faculty. This is a pass/fail course.

Course usage information

AN-692   Anthropology Thesis (Writing)Credits: 3   

Prerequisite: Eighteen credits in Anthropology.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Reading and research leading to significant written work, under the direction of a member of the anthropology faculty. This is a pass/fail course.