History

Chair: Richard Veit, Department of History and Anthropology

The History curriculum is designed to provide an understanding of the complex forces and values that have shaped the modern world and to prepare students for graduate school or for careers in teaching, museums and historical societies, the law, politics, public service, journalism, or business.

The Interdisciplinary History and Political Science curriculum is designed to provide training in both history and politics for students who wish greater breadth of understanding of contemporary society in preparation for careers in business, law, politics, public service, or journalism.

Student Honor Society: Phi Alpha Theta

Julius Adekunle, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, University of Ife, Nigeria; MA, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; PhD, Dalhousie University, Canada. Teaching fields include African history, Africa and its diaspora, and Western Civilization. Recent research on Nigerian history and society.
jadekunl@monmouth.edu

Kenneth Campbell, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Virginia Commonwealth University; MA, PhD, University of Delaware. Teaching fields include English history, Medieval and early modern Europe, and history of witchcraft. Recent research on the English Reformation and religious nonconformity in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England.
campbell@monmouth.edu

Ashleigh Dean, Assistant Professor. BA, MA, University of North Florida; PhD, Emory University. Research interests include globalization, Sino-Western encounters, diplomatic history, trans-colonial interactions, trade, and maritime history.

Christopher DeRosa, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Columbia University; PhD, Temple University. Fields include military history and American political history. Recent research concerns the political indoctrination of American soldiers.
cderosa@monmouth.edu

Maureen Dorment, Lecturer. BS, Georgetown University; MS, Monmouth University; PhD candidate, Drew University. Research interests include the history of print culture and intellectual history. Teaching areas include Western Civilization, propaganda, and censorship.
mdorment@monmouth.edu

Geoffrey Fouad, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BS, Catawba College; MS, University of South Florida; PhD, San Diego State University/UC Santa Barbara. Geographer using geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and modeling to study environmental systems in space and time.
gfouad@monmouth.edu

George J Gonzalez, Assistant Professor. ThD, Harvard Divinity School. Dr. González teaches courses in religious studies, ethics, and philosophy. His research methodology, philosophical anthropology, is highly interdisciplinary and weaves together ethnography, philosophical inquiry, social science, and historiography in the service of intersubjective inquiry and anthropological ethics. Dr. González’s recent publications are in the area of religion and capitalism. His research interests include critical theory, postcolonial studies, Latino/a studies, gender and queer studies, religion and the professions, New Age religions, and post-secularism. Dr. González is also involved in interfaith initiatives both within and outside the University.
ggonzale@monmouth.edu

Walter Greason, Lecturer.
Dean, Honors School. BA, Villanova University; PhD, Temple University. Writes about world, economic, and intellectual history. Serves as the Treasurer for the Society for American City and Regional Planning History. Most recent book, Suburban Erasure: How the Suburbs Ended the Civil Rights Movement in New Jersey, documents forgotten chapters in the northern Civil Rights Movement, while explaining the failure of racial integration to address economic inequality. In 2011, Dr. Greason won a grant from the Mellon Foundation for his innovative pedagogy, earning him recognition as an International Master Teacher.
wgreason@monmouth.edu

Frederick McKitrick, Associate Professor. BA, MA, PhD, Columbia University. Teaching areas include German history, French history, and modern European history. Current research is on German artisans of the Nazi and post-Nazi periods.
fmckitri@monmouth.edu

Brooke A. Nappi, Lecturer. BA, Monmouth University; MA, Montclair State University
bnappi@monmouth.edu

Katherine Parkin, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Lake Forest College; PhD, Temple University. Major areas of interest include U.S. history and American women.
kparkin@monmouth.edu

Thomas Pearson, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Santa Clara University; MA, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Teaching fields include Russian history, Soviet and Russian foreign policy, comparative revolutions, nineteenth-centry Europe, and modern Eastern Europe. His most recent research has focused on government and peasantry in modern Russian history.
pearson@monmouth.edu

Maryanne Rhett, Associate Professor and History Graduate Program Director (Graduate Faculty). BA, University of South Carolina; MA, University of Arizona; PhD, Washington State University. Areas of teaching are Islam and the Middle East. Research focuses on the Balfour Declaration of 1917.
mrhett@monmouth.edu

Karen Schmelzkopf, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, MA, Florida Atlantic University; PhD, Pennsylvania State University. Interests include Geographic Information Systems, land use policy, community organizations, and urban redevelopment. Current research projecs include community activism, politics of public space, and urban redevelopment issues in Asbury Park.
kschmelz@monmouth.edu

Richard F. Veit, Professor and Chair (Graduate Faculty). BA, Drew University; MA, College of William and Mary; PhD, University of Pennsylvania. Teaching areas include archaeology, historic preservation, North American Indians, and New Jersey history. Research interests include historical archaeology, industrial archaeology, and early American Material Culture. Author of Digging New Jersey’s Past: Historical Archaeology in the Garden State.
rveit@monmouth.edu

Hettie Williams, Lecturer. BA, Rowan University; MA, Monmouth University; PhD, Drew University. Teaching and research interests include African American history; gender in U.S. history; and race and ethnic studies.
hwilliam@monmouth.edu

Melissa Suzanne Ziobro, Specialist Professor. BA, MA, Monmouth University Interests include public history. Serves as the faculty advisor of the History and Anthropology Club and the coordinator of the Student Veteran Oral History Project and the fledgling Monmouth Memories Oral History Project. She also coordinates the Department's visiting exhibit series and edits the Department newsletter, and is the department's social media coordinator.
mziobro@monmouth.edu

Course usage information

HS-101   Western Civilization in World Perspective ICredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HS.SV

An introduction to the major historical developments in the history of Western society and its intellectual tradition. Secondarily, it is also an introduction to the uses of history itself. Our survey will consider ancient Greece and Rome, Medieval Europe, the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the rise of nation-states in Europe. To understand the history of the West in a larger context, we will examine it in relation to the history of the Middle East, particularly at points of contact such as the Crusades.

Course usage information

HS-102   Western Civilization in World Perspective IICredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HS.SV

A readings-based introduction to Western history, from the seventeenth century to the present, in the perspective of a major non-Western civilization. Topics include the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, the World Wars, the Cold War, and Globalization.

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HS-105   The Verdict of HistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HS.SV

Students will explore the history of Western civilization through some of its most controversial and pivotal trials. They will study both the historical context and the particulars of such cases, as the trials of Socrates, Jesus of Nazareth, Joan of Arc, Martin Luther, Galileo, the Amistad rebels, Alfred Dreyfus, Oscar Wilde, John Scopes, Sacco and Vanzetti, Adolf Eichmann, and O.J. Simpson.

Course usage information

HS-107   Love and Marriage in Historical PerspectiveCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HS.SV

Love and Marriage in Historical Perspective is a reading-and-discussion-based thematic history course. This course is designed to expose students to the history of love and marriage from classical antiquity to the present in global perspective. Marriage is one of the oldest social institutions in human culture: and, as an institution, it has not always been associated with the concept of love. This course considers the transformation of marriage as both a public, private, political, economic, social, and emotional institution that has been fundamental to the development of human societies. This includes a discussion of the Greco-Roman world, the Middle Ages, the Romantic era and marriage in the global village at the present. Why is traditional marriage on the decline in Western societies? What is traditional marriage? When, why, and how did the idea of love get tangled up with marriage and how successful has the love-marriage connection been over time? Why is marriage in crisis? What does love have to do with it? What are the revolutionary implications of the rise and fall of marriage as a love-match? These are some of the questions we will contemplate in this course as associated with issues related to sex, gender, sexuality, race and class by examining love and marriage in literature, poetry, music, and in philosophical treatises on the subject utilizing the historical method as the primary approach.

Course usage information

HS-108   Human Gods: Science, Technology, and Culture in HistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HS.SV

This is a readings-and-discussion-based history course on the interplay between science, technology, and culture in human societies from the scientific revolution to the human genome project. In this course, we will explore the relationship between what science writer Richard Rhodes has alluded to in his text The Making of the Atomic Bomb as a "Republic of Science" and human culture, as coupled with discussion of the connection between scientific discovery and technological advance (an in turn how technology impacts human culture) within the context of world history. The focal point of this course is to critically examine how scientists are shaped by the cultures they live in and how scientists and their discoveries impact culture. Specifically, we will contemplate how cultural attitudes about race and gender shape scientific inquiry such as with the emergence of race science in the age of Darwin during the nineteenth century, and the emergence of eugenics in the early twentieth century. The overarching theme of the course is "Human Gods" because we will pay close attention to how scientists in their attempts to manipulate nature in the sense "play god" and how playing god may have devastating consequences for marginalized groups in particular and humanity more generally. The various arenas of science and technology including medicine, military technology, and computer technology are examined to demonstrate how individuals, industries, and governments have harnessed science and technology to control nature (such as with disease control, other nations in warfare, and general human activity via computer technologies).

Course usage information

HS-115   Empires in HistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HS.SV

This course will examine the political, economic, religious, intellectual, and social lives of a select number of world empires. We will analyze how each of these empires came into being, and why they fell apart. Case studies will include western and non-western empires, and range from the preclassical to the modern.

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HS-116   War in HistoryCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): HS.SV

A historical survey of the evolution of warfare and the interaction of war and society, putting the western experience of war in a larger world perspective.

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HS-148   RevolutionsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HS.SV

This course will study Western Civilization in World Perspectives II through the lens of revolution, 1715-2015. As the revolutions are many, due to time constraints, the course will necessarily be limited. It will focus on selected revolutions (subject to change) that impacted the development of the modern west. Transcending national borders and resonating across continents, these revolutions sought an end to tyrannical government, relief from the ravages of the industrial world and freedom from foreign domination and influence. In their efforts to create a better society and a better world, these revolutions, at once heroic and horrific, produced change on an epochal scale that, in some instances, is playing out in the contemporary community.

Course usage information

HS-173   Environmental HistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HS.SV

Environmental history is an introduction to major developments in world history through the lens of environmental change and experience. As, additionally, an introduction to history itself this survey considers the interaction between people, states, empires, and the "natural world" from the "dawn of time" through the present. Students will examine the relationship between human society(ies) and the natural world over recorded time. As an interdisciplinary exercise this class will draw on the natural sciences and history to better understand the biological, cultural, imperial, ethical, economic, religious, political, and global ramifications of the relationship between humanity and humanity's natural surroundings.

Course usage information

HS-198   Special Topics in History (100 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in history to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar-basis.

Course usage information

HS-201   United States History ICredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The development of the multi-ethnic American nation. Colonial origins, the Revolution, the Age of Jackson, slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Not open to students who have taken HS-103.

Course usage information

HS-202   United State History IICredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

The development of the multi-ethnic American nation. The emergence of modern industrial America, domestic reform and civil rights, world conflict, and leadership. Not open to students who have taken HS-104.

Course usage information

HS-203   New Jersey History: A Mirror on AmericaCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSUS, WT

An introduction to and overview of New Jersey history (1600-1950). Various trends in local history are tied to national developments. Important people, events, and trends in the state history are examined.

Course usage information

HS-209   The History of African-AmericansCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, HSUS, RE

The study of African-Americans from their first contacts with Europeans through the rise of the Black Power movement in the 1960's; the status of African-American society and contributions to American culture.

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HS-212   Introduction to Public HistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Defines public history, explains its past, and explores its intricacy to the future of the historical profession. Topics covered will include oral history, museums and archives management, history's influence on public policy, teaching history, history and the media, cultural tourism, the politics of memory, and digital history. Students will put what they have learned in the classroom to work in the field via a capstone service learning project. All students will, throughout the course of the semester, produce portfolio items suitable for presentation to future employers.

Course usage information

HS-215   The Rise of Modern America, 1877-1933Credits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Course Type(s): CD, HSUS, WT

The response to industrialism and the search for a new order by farmers, laborers, immigrants, African-Americans, and reformers.

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HS-216   Recent American History, 1933-PresentCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSUS

The development of an urban nation and its related problems, emergence of minority groups, welfare capitalism versus welfare statism, and the impact of war and revolution upon domestic programs.

Course usage information

HS-219   United States Military HistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HSUS

Surveys the American experience of war, from the first Native American-European contact through the military interventions at the dawn of the twenty-first century; examines not only the major conflicts in this period, but also the evolution of strategy, military institutions, civil-military relations, and the American way of war.

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HS-220   History of AdvertisingCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GS, HSUS

Designed to develop a critical understanding of the historical evolution of advertising in the United States, with critical attention to race, class, gender, and sexuality. We will explore the economic, political, and cultural factors that have contributed to the development of advertising, and which have been affected by advertising. Some of the topics to be discussed include: the rise of national advertising; the relation of advertising to consumption; advertising to children; political advertising, the relationship between advertisers and the medium in which they appear (magazines, television, radio, etc.), and broadcast and Internet advertising. Also listed as AN-220 and GS-220.

Course usage information

HS-225   Supreme Court Decisions in American HistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSUS

Analyzes American history through United States Supreme Court decisions. Explores how the Court developed, grew in strength, and the effect it has had on America's political and cultural development. It will also consider how the Court's size, structure, and political importance impacted on society according to the historical era being studied. Also listed as PS-225.

Course usage information

HS-233   Classical CivilizationsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSPRE

Mediterranean civilizations from the Ancient Near East through Classical Greece and Rome, to the close of the Western Roman Empire.

Course usage information

HS-243   Medieval Europe I (300-1400)Credits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSPRE

Europe from the decline of Rome through the fourteenth century. Semester I (to 1100): barbarian invasions, rise of the Church, early medieval culture, Byzantium and Islam, feudalism and manorialism. Semester II: Empire vs. Papacy, the Church at its height, the flowering of medieval culture.

Course usage information

HS-244   Medieval Europe II (300-1400)Credits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSPRE

Europe from the decline of Rome through the fourteenth century. Semester I (to 1100): barbarian invasions, rise of the Church, early medieval culture, Byzantium and Islam, feudalism and manorialism. Semester II: Empire vs. Papacy, the Church at its height, the flowering of medieval culture.

Course usage information

HS-251   History of the British Isles ICredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSPRE

Roman, Anglo-Saxon, and Celtic cultures; consolidation of the Anglo-Norman Feudal Monarchy; the impact of the Reformation and Tudor absolutism; and constitutional crisis and revolution to 1688.

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HS-252   History of the British Isles IICredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSEU

Union between England and Scotland, Parliamentary reform, Industrial Revolution, Empire and Commonwealth, Ireland and Home Rule, democracy and the welfare state, and contemporary Britain and Ireland.

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HS-253   History of IrelandCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HSEU

Selected themes in Irish history from prehistoric times to the present, including Celtic Christianity, Norman Conquest and Gaelic Recovery, Protestant Ascendancy, Rebellion and Revolution, the Famine and Emigration, Home Rule, the Irish Republic, the Troubles in Northern Ireland and the European Union.

Course usage information

HS-261   History of Russia ICredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): BI.EL, GU, HSAS, HSEU, HSNW, HSPRE

Russia from ancient times to the Nuclear Age. Semester I: the consolidation and decline of the Kievan state, the Muscovite and Imperial eras, the impact of the West to about 1855.

Course usage information

HS-262   History of Russia IICredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): ARHIS, CD, HSAS, HSEU, HSNW

Russia from ancient times to the Nuclear Age. Semester II: the reform era, revolutionary movements, the Soviet state, and the evolution and collapse of the communist regime.

Course usage information

HS-264   North American IndiansCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, HSPRE, HSUS, RE

Survey of the cultural, social, and linguistic diversity of pre-Columbian North American societies and problems of contemporary Indian groups. Also listed as AN-264.

Course usage information

HS-266   Historical ArchaeologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: AN-103 or HS-201; and EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSPRE, HSUS, WT

Provides an introduction to historical archaeology, the archaeology of the modern world (c.1492+). Focuses on archaeological sites in the United States. Students are introduced to the various written and material sources that historical archaeologists use to interpret the recent past, including artifacts, vernacular architecture, grave markers, documents, photographs and other visual sources. Archaeological field methods are also introduced with a minimum of one class period spent excavating an archaeological site. Also listed as AN-266.

Course usage information

HS-270   European Civilizations in the Nineteenth CenturyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HSEU

A survey of European politics, industrialization, technology, society, art, science, ideas, and global connections in the nineteenth century, 1815-1914.

Course usage information

HS-271   Europe, 1914-1939Credits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): BI.EL, GU, HSEU, WT

Europe during and after World War I: the consequences of that war, the crisis of European democracy, Communism and the Soviet Union, the rise of Fascism in Italy and National Socialism in Germany, and the failure of collective security.

Course usage information

HS-272   Europe Since 1939Credits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, HSEU, WT

World War II and post-war Europe: the Cold War, European recovery, economic integration, Communism in Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union as a major power, and Europe's changing role.

Course usage information

HS-283   The Civilizations of Asia (India, China, Japan)Credits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSAS, HSNW, HSPRE

A survey of Asia's great cultural traditions through literature, art, science, religion and institutions, and the interplay of these traditional cultures with Western civilization.

Course usage information

HS-288   Cooperative Education: HistoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX2

Provides students with an opportunity to apply classroom theory in practice through actual work experience. Placements are selected to forward the student's career interest through experiential education. Repeatable for credit.

Course usage information

HS-290   Popular Culture and the Middle EastCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, HSNW, RE

Examines recent events, traditional cultural practices, and the perceptions of the Middle East through the lens of popular media (film, graphic novels, journalism, etc.). Topics to be covered may include but are not limited to: religion, the Arab Spring (2011), the Iranian Revolution, the Arab-Israeli Conflict, women's rights/roles, Orientalism and racism, and common governing structures. Also listed as AN-290.

Course usage information

HS-291   Introduction to Islamic HistoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): BI.EL, GU, HSAS, HSEU, HSNW, HSPRE, RE, WT

Examines the history and development of the Islamic umma (the community of Muslim believers) across time and space. Traces the development of Islam, taking care to understand the environment into which it was first introduced, and follow its development in terms of philosophy and spirituality to the present day. Takes into account variation within the religion as it spread out of the Arabian Peninsula and across the world.

Course usage information

HS-292   The Middle East and the Rise of the Gunpowder EmpiresCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): BI.EL, GU, HSAS, HSNW, WT

Examines the history of the Middle East from the 1200s through the end of the 1700s. In the West this era is typically known as the high-water mark for Islamic Civilization, an era marked by a height for Islamic art, architecture, and political organization, this era also marks the time during which Islamic governments held power over the largest swath of territory. To understand this time period students will examine Persian, Ottoman, Egyptian, Indian, and Magrabi/Andalusian history.

Course usage information

HS-293   The African Diaspora in the AmericasCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, HSNW, HSUS, RE, WT

The dispersion of African people across the world was a seminal event in the history of humankind. African people have profoundly influenced the development of human history from this dispersion. Includes a comprehensive historical overview of the African Diaspora in the Caribbean, Latin America, and North America, from the height of the Atlantic Slave Trade in the eighteenth century to the present.

Course usage information

HS-295   History of AfricaCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, HSAF, HSNW, RE

Africa in modern times, emphasizing the sub-Saharan part of the continent; traditional African civilizations; European colonization and its impact on Africa; economic, social, and political transformation; and the problems of nation-building.

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HS-296   Cultures and Societies of AfricaCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, HSAF, HSNW, RE, WT

Examines the history, cultures, and societies of Africa from the precolonial to the contemporary period. Discusses the cultural, political, and economic changes that have taken place in Africa as a result of Western influence. Also listed as AN-296.

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HS-297   History of West AfricaCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: HS-101 and HS-102; and EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): CD, HSAF, HSNW, HSPRE, RE, WT

An examination of the history of West Africa from AD 1000 to the present. Special topics include: the sources of West African history, the peoples and empires of West Africa, agriculture and the trans-Saharan trade, the introduction of Islam, the coming of the Europeans, and the post-independent period of West Africa.

Course usage information

HS-298   Special Topics in History (200 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in history to be announced prior to registration. The course may be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

HS-299   Independent Study in HistoryCredits: 1-3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Guided study of a selected topic in history not substantially treated in a regular course, under the direction of a member of the History faculty. Extensive reading and at least one written report are required.

Course usage information

HS-303   American Colonial and Early National PeriodCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSUS

The evolution of the British colonies from their establishment to the American Revolution. The first problems in the development of the new nation to the era of Andrew Jackson.

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HS-304   Monuments and Commemoration: Loss and RemembranceCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSUS

Examines the evolution of American attitudes towards commemoration and remembrance from the colonial period to the present. Focuses on the analysis of landscapes and artifacts, e.g., monuments, grave markers, cemeteries, and historic sites. Topics discussed include the evolution of American burial grounds from colonial burial grounds to the rural cemeteries of the Victorians, and modern memorial parks. Changing grave marker designs and iconography are examined. Distinct ethnic, regional, and national memorial practices are also studied. Public memorials in the form of statuary, commemorative institutions, and historic sites will also be discussed. There will be field trips to select sites. Also listed as AN-304.

Course usage information

HS-305   Women in US HistoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GS, HSUS, WT

Surveys women's historical experience in the US. The emphasis of the course will be on how women of different socio-economic backgrounds, races, and ethnic groups have shaped and been affected by US History. Also listed as GS-305.

Course usage information

HS-306   Jazz Age and Harlem RenaissanceCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): CD, HSUS, RE, WT

Focus will be on race, gender, class and sexuality in Jazz Age America as related to the development of the Harlem Renaissance. Harlem was the center of black culture in the 1920s; but this "New Negro Movement" stretched far beyond Harlem. In this course, we will explore both the national and transnational dimensions of the Harlem Renaissance and how the culture of the Harlem Renaissance helped to shape modern American culture more broadly. This course will include an examination of the Harlem Renaissance in American history from multiple perspectives including literary, artistic, cinematic, economic and philosophical aspects of the Renaissance in American history.

Course usage information

HS-307   History of Sexuality in AmericaCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, GS, HSUS, RE, WT

Explores the social and cultural history of sexuality in the United States. How race, class, and gender have influenced ideas about sexuality, morality, and power. Major topics include: reproduction, gay and lesbian sexualities, sexually transmitted diseases, and sexual representation and censorship. Also listed as GS-307.

Course usage information

HS-308   The American Civil Rights MovementCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, HSUS, RE

Includes a historical examination of the major personalities, groups, and organizations central to the development of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. Students will be introduced to important scholarship and participant histories crucial to the Movement through an examination of both primary and secondary source material.

Course usage information

HS-309   Readings in African-American Intellectual HistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, HSUS, RE

Examines some of the major themes and thinkers in the development of the African-American intellectual tradition from the black abolitionists to the present. Major topics of the course include the formation of black oppositional leadership in the Reconstruction south, Booker T. Washington and racial accommodation, W.E.B. DuBois and integration, along with Black Nationalism and contemporary, black-feminist theory.

Course usage information

HS-310   Business and Economic Development of the United StatesCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSUS, WT

The impact of political and economic decisions on the structure of society: agrarianism, merchant capitalism, laissez-faire industrialism, neomercantilism, and the social welfare state.

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HS-312   Oral HistoryCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Students will learn about oral history by reading about it, researching it, and actually doing it. Students will end the semester with a solid understanding of when, why, and how to conduct oral history interviews, as well as an awareness of the logistical, ethical, and legal considerations involved in doing so. All students will, throughout the course of the semester, produce portfolio items suitable for presentation to future employers.

Course usage information

HS-313   History of the Book in AmericaCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HO, HSUS, WT

Examines the impact of printed text in America historical development from the colonial era to the present day. It will cover selected topics that will demonstrate that the printed text in all of its various manifestations was shaped by a nascent and evolving American culture and, in turn, was instrumental in shaping this culture.

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HS-314   Exploring History and Heritage SitesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The days of whitewashed, feel good history; staid curators; dusty, static museum displays; and musty, hushed archives are fading. Today, the public history community is constantly reassessing what constitutes a history or heritage site, and how traditional sites like museums and archives should operate in the 21st century. In this class, we will consider what history and heritage sites look like, and what they can do to stay relevant while still honoring their core values. In addition to reading the latest in the historiography, students will spend several class sessions visiting local sites, which will act as case studies related to designated readings.

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HS-315   Field Research in ArchaeologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: AN-103 or AN-107 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX5, HSUS

Archaeological field methods, analysis of data, and anthropological interpretation; students will do supervised work on local sites. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Also listed as AN-315.

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HS-316   The Worker in American LifeCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSUS, WT

A survey of the major historical transformations affecting the lives of American working people, from the late eighteenth century to the present, and their social, political, economic, and cultural response to these changes.

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HS-317   Museum and Archives Management BasicsCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): None

Introduces students to the best practices and procedures of museum and archives management. Topics covered will include the basics of museum and archives administration, as well as the basics of records management, collections care, exhibition, and interpretation.

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HS-318   History of Public PolicyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): CD, HSUS, PO, WT

A survey of major issues in domestic public policy. Emphasis on changes in the process of policy formulation in both the public and private sectors from the early nineteenth century to the present.

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HS-319   History of the American CityCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, HSUS, RE, WT

Students study the history of the American city from the colonial era to the present, examining how cultural, economic, geographical, political, and technological factors have influenced urban development and vice versa.

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HS-330   The Civil War and ReconstructionCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSUS, RE, WT

Covers the military, political, and social history of the American Civil War, and the rise, the fall, and the legacies of the postwar Reconstruction.

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HS-331   World War IICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSUS, WT

Considers the military, economic, and political characteristics of the Allied and Axis powers and the strategies they produced; examines the military campaigns, the wartime economies, life on the home fronts, the experience of combat, the dynamics of occupation, and the roles of morality and immorality in the conduct of the war.

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HS-332   The Cold WarCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSUS, WT

Examines the rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union that organized global politics for forty-five years; the roles of ideology, economy, and security that fueled it; and the diplomacy, propaganda, and the armed might used to wage it; and the impact it had on participants' politics and culture.

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HS-333   The Vietnam EraCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HSUS, RE

The Vietnam Era, which grew out of America's longest war, was a major influence on American society at home and abroad. Explores the military and political role the U.S. played in this conflict, its influences on American society, and the living legacy of this turbulent era.

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HS-344   French Revolution and NapoleonCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, HSEU, WT

Study of France and French influence on Europe between 1789 and 1815; the causes and changing aims of the Revolution, the conflict of ideologies, the failure of the First Republic, and the Napoleonic Empire.

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HS-349   Slavery in the Atlantic WorldCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: AN-380 or GS-252 or SO-252.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The emergence and decline of racial slavery in the Atlantic World from 1492 to 1888 is the primary focus of this course. Students will learn to understand and articulate the major forces that facilitated the development and collapse of modern slavery in the Atlantic Work and how the residual impact of this system continues to shape contemporary race relations and systems of power at the present. There will be an emphasis on the interrelationship between race, gender, and class in New World plantation societies as evolving systems of power in North America, Latin America, and the Caribbean over time including some discussion of the Black Atlantic. The class serves as a required course for students minoring in race and ethnic studies.

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HS-351   Victorian CultureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, HSEU, WT

Victorian England was the first nation to experience the full force of the societal upheaval caused by industrialization. This course will focus on selected aspects of this culture to demonstrate the complexity of the problems faced by Victorians and the ensuing debates in all theaters of life on proposed solutions to these problems. Specific emphasis will be placed on Victorianism, the middle class ethos, which was both product and agent of Victorian culture.

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HS-352   Militant NationalismCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSNW, RE

Examines the development of militant nationalist groups and the ideologies behind militant nationalism over the course of the twentieth century. Several case studies will be examined including, but not necessarily limited to: the Irish Republican Army (IRA), the National Liberation Front of Algeria (FLN), the Euskadi Ta Askatasuna (ETA), and the Tamil Tigers (LTTE).

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HS-357   Blood & Iron: Germany in the Nineteenth CenturyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, HSEU, WT

Prussian militarism, legacy of the French Revolution, 1848, Bismarck and Unification, social tensions in the Empire, industrialization, nationalism and racism, and causes of World War I.

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HS-358   Modern Germany, 1914-PresentCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, HSEU, WT

World War I, Revolution of 1918-19, Weimar Republic, origins of Nazism, the Third Reich, World War II, the Occupation, post-war Germanys, and Unification.

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HS-359   The HolocaustCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): HSEU, RE

An examination of the Holocaust with special emphasis on the historical background in European political, social, economic, and religious institutions; the implications of the planned extermination of European Jewry for world civilization; and the question of responsibility.

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HS-361   Revolution and Reaction: Jews of the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union (1772-1939)Credits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): CD, HSEU

This cultural, social, religious, economic and political history of the Jews of the Russian Empire in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Who were they and where did they come from? What was their place in society and what policies were invoked in the Russian Empire to deal with the "Jewish problem?" How did their lives change after the Bolshevik revolution and the establishment of the Soviet Union?

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HS-367   Civilizations of the AndesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Three credits in anthropology or sociology; EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): BI.EL, GU, HSLA, HSNW, HSPRE, WT

A survey of the anthropological history of the Andes from the beginning of civilization through the Inca Empire to contemporary Quechua and Aymara speakers. Pre-Inca societies, social and political organization of peasant culture, and the role of rural migration in transforming contemporary Andean cities. Also listed as AN-367.

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HS-388   Cooperative Education: HistoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: HS-101 and HS-102 and Junior or Senior standing.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX2

Provides students with an opportunity to apply classroom theory in practice through actual work experience. Placements are selected to forward the student's career interest through experiential education. This course is repeatable for credit.

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HS-391   The Modern Middle EastCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): GU, HSNW, RE, WT

Covers the history of the geographic Middle East, North Africa and some of South and Central Asia (largely the heartland of the Islamic world) from 1798 to the present. Particularly interested in examining the fall of empires and monarchies and the rise of modern nationalist movements in addition to the rise of religious fundamentalist and socialist movements across the region as well.

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HS-392   History of the Arab-Israeli ConflictCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): BI.EL, CD, HSAS, HSEU, HSNW, RE, WT

Examines the development of the conflict over a region known as Palestine (post-1948: Israel) from the late 1800s to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on themes related to imperialism, nationalism, cultural definition, religion, ethnicity, gender, militancy, and the environment.

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HS-396   Colonial AfricaCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): GU, HSAF, HSNW

Examines the process of European colonization of Africa in the second half of the nineteenth century. The main issues include: the scramble for and partition of Africa; African resistance to European imperialism and colonization; colonial political, economic, and social policies; the rise of nationalism, and the process of decolonization.

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HS-397   Globalization and AfricaCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): GU, HSAF, HSNW, RE

Globalization has profoundly influenced and transformed Africa in multi-dimensional ways-economically, politically, and socially. While globalization is not a new development, it has had a significant impact on Africa since the late nineteenth century. Africa has been connected to the world market thereby leading to opportunities for economic growth and development. Although African states are still grappling with sustainable economy, they remain strongly attached to the world economic system. Politically, there has been a transition from the monarchical to the parliamentary/presidential systems. This course will examine the concept of globalization, how it has impacted Africa, how Africa how responded to the economic, political, and social changes and challenges. We will also discuss the ways Africa can become more relevant in global affairs.

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HS-398   Special Topics in History (300 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in history to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

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HS-435   The RenaissanceCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: HS-101 and HS-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSPRE

Europe in transition from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century; the crisis of the Church, humanism and art, politics, diplomacy, exploration and discovery, science and the occult.

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HS-436   The ReformationCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Junior standing or 12 credits in History.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSPRE

A study of sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century religious and political developments in Europe; causes of the Reformation, its political and social institutionalization, ideas of reformers, wars of religion, and the Counter-Reformation. Also listed as RS-436.

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HS-437   Power and Enlightenment: Europe 1648-1789Credits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSPRE

A study of European history from the Treaty of Westphalia to the French Revolution, emphasizing the contrast between political and military developments, and cultural and intellectual trends. Special emphasis on the development of absolutism in France, Prussia, Austria, Spain, and Russia; the struggle against absolutism in Britain, Sweden, and the Netherlands; the ideals and goals of the European enlightenment, developing social and political tensions, and enlightened despotism.

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HS-453   Tudor - Stuart EnglandCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Junior standing or twelve credits in History; and EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): HSEU, HSPRE, WT

Focus will be on society, politics, and religion in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. Major topics for discussion will include the English Reformation, the Age of Elizabeth and Shakespeare, the British Civil Wars, the Restoration, and the Revolution of 1688. Each topic will be discussed with reference to the social and economic changes that helped to mold this period.

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HS-461   Research Seminar in HistoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: HS-201, HS-202, senior standing, and eighteen credits of History above HS-202.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): RD

The development, research, and writing of a research paper in history, with special emphasis on scrupulous documentation, use of primary sources, clear expository writing, and oral presentation of research results. Country or region of study is open.

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HS-488   Cooperative Education: HistoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX2

Provides students with an opportunity to apply classroom theory in practice through actual work experience. Placements are selected to forward the student's career interest through experiential education.

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HS-489   History InternshipCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Junior standing, departmental approval, and placement.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX1

Supervised, professional experience in public history programs and institutions (e.g., museums, archives, historical societies, preservation agencies). Emphasis on the development of professional skills in areas such as the care and management of historical collections, public education and outreach programming, collections research and analysis, and grant research and writing. This course is repeatable for credit.

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HS-498   Special Topics in History (400 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in history to be announced prior to registration. May be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

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HS-499   Readings and Research in HistoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Senior standing; status as a History, History and Political Science, or History and Education major with a 3.00 or higher average in major coursework; and prior permission of directing professor and department chair.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Guided study of a selected topic in history not substantially treated in a regular course, under the direction of a member of the History faculty. Extensive reading and at least one written report are required.