English

Chair: Susan Goulding, Department of English
Director of First Year Composition: David Tietge
Undergraduate Program Coordinator: Elizabeth Gilmartin
Graduate Program Director: Kristin Bluemel

The major in English is designed to serve various needs within the framework of traditional literary study, creative writing, and rhetoric. Sensitivity to texts and the attendant skills in writing and analysis are useful for a wide range of careers in today’s changing workplace, including careers in law, teaching, editing, journalism, freelance writing, government service, marketing, management, and business. Combining the major with another minor is encouraged.

Departmental Honors will be earned based on the following criteria being met:

  • An overall GPA of at least 3.3
  • A major GPA of at least 3.5
  • Fulfillment of the intermediate-level language requirement for English majors
  • Two courses beyond those required for the English major as follows:
  1. complete one course from list of EN 300-400 courses chosen with thesis advisor
  2. complete a second course as an independent study/senior thesis with a grade of “B” or better

Student Honor Society: Sigma Tau Delta, Delta Chapter

Mary Kate Azcuy, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). BS, Monmouth University; MA, New York University; PhD, Drew University. Specialty is contemporary American literature with an emphasis on women poets, mythology, and feminism, as well as creative writing.
mazcuy@monmouth.edu

Noel C. Belinski, Lecturer. BA, Barnard College of Columbia University; MAT, Monmouth University. Specialties are composition pedagogy and General Education literature courses.
nbelinsk@monmouth.edu

Stanley S. Blair, Associate Professor. BA, Gardner-Webb College; MA, Marquette; PhD, Duke University. Specialty is American literature. Other interests are New Jersey literature, poetry, history of rhetoric, and popular culture.
sblair@monmouth.edu

Kristin Bluemel, Professor and English Graduate Program Director (Graduate Faculty). BA, Wesleyan University; MA, PhD, Rutgers University. Specialty is twentieth-century British literature. Additional interests include literary criticism and theory, the novel, children’s literature, World War II and the end of empire, and book history.
kbluemel@monmouth.edu

Margaret Del Guercio, Associate Professor. BA, MA, Montclair State College; PhD, New York University. Specialty is the novel in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Major interests are Shakespeare, poetry, and prose fiction.
delguerc@monmouth.edu

Heide Estes, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, University of Pennsylvania; PhD, New York University. Specialty is Old English language and literature, and additional interests include Middle English literature, feminist theory, and representations of Jews in early English texts. Current research is in ecocriticism.
hestes@monmouth.edu

Prescott Evarts, Professor. BA, Harvard College, PhD, Columbia University. Specialty is contemporary English and American literature. Recent interest is poetry.
evarts@monmouth.edu

Melissa Febos, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). MFA, Sarah Lawrence College. Specialty is creative nonfiction, with additional interests in fiction, poetry, contemporary American literature, and women’s studies.
mfebos@monmouth.edu

Frank Fury, Lecturer. BA, Boston College; PhD, Drew University. Specialty is nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature with particular emphasis on representations of sport in American culture. Additional interests include the short story and Shakespeare.
ffury@monmouth.edu

Elizabeth Gilmartin, Lecturer and English Undergraduate Program Coordinator. BA, Georgian Court College; MA, Seton Hall University; PhD, New York University. Areas of interest include the Irish language and Victorian Ireland. Coordinator of the Irish Studies Minor.
egilmart@monmouth.edu

Alex Gilvarry, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). MFA, Hunter College. Specialty is creative writing, fiction.
agilvarr@monmouth.edu

Susan M Goulding, Associate Professor and Chair (Graduate Faculty). BA, MA, Adelphi University; PhD, New York University. Specialties are eighteenth-century British literature, women’s studies, British history, and reception history.
goulding@monmouth.edu

Alena Graedon, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). MFA, Columbia School of the Arts. Specialty is creative writing, fiction, with an emphasis on speculative fiction.

John P. Hanly, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Georgetown College; MA, University of Chicago; PhD, University of Louisville. Areas of specialty include composition theory and ethics.
jphanly@monmouth.edu

Jeffrey Jackson, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). PhD, Rice University. Areas of specialty include nineteenth-century British Romantic and Victorian literature.
jejackso@monmouth.edu

Lynn Kraemer-Siracusa, Lecturer. EdD, Rowan University. Specialty is composition pedagogy.
lsiracus@monmouth.edu

Jennifer Mantle, Lecturer. BA, Georgian Court University; MA, Seton Hall University. Areas of specialty are composition pedagogy, and Romantic and Victorian Literature.
jmantle@monmouth.edu

Mihaela Moscaliuc, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, MA, Al.l. Cuza University; MA, Salisbury University; MFA, New England College; PhD, University of Maryland. Areas of specialty include immigrant literature, postcolonial studies, translational studies, and poetry writing.
mmoscali@monmouth.edu

Linda Sacks, Lecturer. MAT, Monmouth University. Specialty is composition pedagogy.
lsacks@monmouth.edu

Abha Sood, Lecturer. BA, MA University of Delhi; PhD, Indian Institute of Technology. Areas of interest include twentieth-century American fiction, popular literature, and Victorian literature.
apatel@monmouth.edu

Sue Starke, Associate Professor. BA, Wellesley College; PhD, Rutgers University. Specialties are Renaissance literature and cullture, medieval literature, and genre theory.
sstarke@monmouth.edu

David Tietge, Associate Professor and Director of First Year Composition (Graduate Faculty). BA, University of Northern Iowa; MA, Indiana State University; PhD, South Illinois University of Carbondale. Areas of interest include rhetoric and composition, literary theory, rhetorical theory, and popular culture. Current research is in science rhetoric.
dtietge@monmouth.edu

Lisa Vetere, Associate Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Siena College; MA, St. Bonaventrue University; PhD, Lehigh University. Specialty is Antebellum American literature and culture, with an emphasis on cultural studies and feminist and psychoanalytical theory.
lvetere@monmouth.edu

Michael G. Waters, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, MA, State University of New York; MFA, University of Iowa; PhD, Ohio University. Specialties are creative writing, poetry, and American Literture.
mgwaters@monmouth.edu

Courtney Werner, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, Moravian College and Theological Seminary; MA, Texas State University; PhD, Kent State University. Specialities are composition and rhetoric, new media, and multi-modal learning.
cwerner@monmouth.edu

Kenneth Womack, Professor (Graduate Faculty).
Dean, School of Humanities and Social Sciences. BA, Texas AM University; MA, Texas AM University/Moscow Institute of Communication, U.S.S.R.; PhD, Northern Illinois University. Dr. Womack's areas of professional interest include the Beatles, twentieth-century British literature, and creative writing. He serves as Editor of Interdisciplinary Literary Studies: A Journal of Criticism and Theory, published by Penn State University Press, and Co-Editor of the English Association's Year's Work in English Studies, published by Oxford University Press.
kwomack@monmouth.edu

Course usage information

EN-100   Writing WorkshopCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Summer Term

Course Type(s): None

Development of skills useful for essay writing; opportunity to write in other forms; and projects to fit individual student needs. Offered in summer only; restricted to EOF students.

Course usage information

EN-101   College Composition ICredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A college-level writing course designed to prepare students to make the transition from high school to college by familiarizing them with the standards for academic writing they will encounter throughout their educational and professional careers. Students will gain intense experience in writing academic prose that demonstrates knowledge, understanding, analysis, and application of ideas from a variety of progressively sophisticated and interrelated texts.

Course usage information

EN-102   College Composition IICredits: 3   

Prerequisite: EN-101.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Reinforces and expands the reading and writing activities taught in English 101 (academic writing demonstrating knowledge, understanding, analysis, and application of ideas). In addition to sustaining what has already been learned in other writing courses, EN 102 focuses on the academic "research" essay as a fundamental written form needed across the disciplines.

Course usage information

EN-201   Literature I: Ancient Through RenaissanceCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): LIT

Works from the Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance periods.

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EN-202   Literature II: Neoclassical to the PresentCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): LIT

Works from the Renaissance to the present.

Course usage information

EN-211   Environment and Pre-Modern LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): LIT

Environmental criticism, sometimes called "ecocriticism", examines the ways in which literary texts represent the natural world and human relationships with it. Looks at several works from the Ancient and Medieval periods, considering how people from different times and places before the modern era think about "nature" and natural resources.

Course usage information

EN-212   Literature of OppressionCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): LIT

Selected works of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries are covered, with attention to representations of oppression as displayed in slavery, colonialism, imperialism, and post-colonial responses.

Course usage information

EN-213   Tragedy and the TragicCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): LIT

Explores the nature of literary tragedy by having students consider the conventions of both classical and Shakespearean tragedy and decide whether literary narratives that are merely sad - particularly those in contemporary times and from genres other than drama - may similarly be termed "tragedy".

Course usage information

EN-214   The Irish: Home and AbroadCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): LIT

A comparison of the Irish epic The Tain to The Odyssey and exploration of the literature and culture of Ireland and the Irish diaspora, which may include writers of Irish descent from Canada, the U.S., Australia, South America, and other parts of the world.

Course usage information

EN-215   Vampire Literature: Bite MeCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): LIT

Literature about vampires starting with nineteenth-century European texts and moving into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in the Americas. These texts involve themes of vampirism representative to cultural, ethical, and political issues for their times.

Course usage information

EN-216   Illness in LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HE.EL, HEPE, LIT

An examination of illness in literature.

Course usage information

EN-217   Rebirth in ComedyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): LIT

Selected texts of the tradition of comedy, from Ancient Greece to the present, including plays, novels, and movies.

Course usage information

EN-218   Here Be Dragons: Heroic JourneysCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): LIT

Explores representative heroic journeys in literature. These heroes follow an archetypal path outlined by mythologist Joseph Campbell. The diverse heroes arrive to understand and engage ethical, moral, political, gender, social, economic, and ethnic challenges. They must learn to develop beyond their limitations and flaws in order to face the dragon, danger and evil, and to lead and save a people, place, and/or idea.

Course usage information

EN-219   Science FictionCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102, or equivalent.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): LIT

This LIT course on the literature of Science Fiction is designed to introduce students to the genre of Science Fiction (SF) from works that were written between the mid-nineteenth century and the late twentieth. As a uniquely modern form of literature, it is important to contextualize the genre historically, politically, and culturally, as it reflects attitudes about science, progress, and the human condition that dominated at the time the works were written and, often, provide clues to cultural orientations that persist to this day. We will examine both SF short stories and novels to more clearly understand how this genre of literature has become one of the most popular forms of social commentary on the past, present, and future of humanity.

Course usage information

EN-220   Literature of the SeaCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): LIT

Literature of the sea since the Enlightenment with major texts representing diverse nations and global contexts.

Course usage information

EN-226   Literary Studies for English MajorsCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): WT

An introduction to literary studies. Close study of representative texts in fiction, poetry, drama, the essay, and literary theory and criticism; writing of analytical essays, integrating close reading of text with theoretical critical approaches.

Course usage information

EN-227   Foundations of British LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): WT

A British and Irish literature survey from the Middle Ages through the late eighteenth century, emphasizing close analysis of texts and fundamental approaches to critical writing.

Course usage information

EN-228   Foundations of American LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): WT

An American literature survey from the Colonial period to the Civil War, emphasizing fundamental critical terms and concepts and the use of writing to explore relationships between literature and criticism.

Course usage information

EN-229   Non-European Literature in EnglishCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): RE, WT

Survey of national literature from the non-western, non-European world. Literary analysis and class reading of selected prose, poetry and dramatic literature.

Course usage information

EN-251   Creative Writing: IntroductionCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Students analyze in a workshop setting readings in two or more genres of literature (poetry, fiction, drama, non-fiction) to observe techniques in craft, and present their own creative writings for intensive examination by workshop participants.

Course usage information

EN-252   Creative Writing: FictionCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: EN-251 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ENCWU

Short-story writing with critiques. This course is repeatable once for credit, with departmental permission.

Course usage information

EN-253   Creative Writing: PoetryCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: EN-251 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): ENCWU

Experiment with a variety of verse forms and techniques for the purpose of developing creativity and deepening the appreciation of poetry. Repeatable once for credit, with departmental permission.

Course usage information

EN-254   Creative Writing: DramaCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: EN-251 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ENCWU

The writing of one-act plays; development of comic and dramatic techniques. Repeatable once for credit with departmental permission.

Course usage information

EN-255   Creative Writing: Non-FictionCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: EN-251 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ENCWU

Development of advanced writing skills to explore a variety of personal essay forms, such as the memoir, travel writing, and the lyric essay. Repeatable once for credit, with departmental permission.

Course usage information

EN-271   Professional WritingCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An advanced writing workshop introducing the rhetorical principles and writing practices necessary for producing appropriate workplace writing; emphasis on a wide range of audiences, genres, ethical issues and contexts that professional writers commonly encounter.

Course usage information

EN-298   Special Topics in English (200 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in English to be announced prior to registration. The course may be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

EN-299   Independent Study in EnglishCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT, and permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Independent Study in English: Reading, writing, and research on a selected topic under the direction of an English department faculty member. For the CW or any of the Writing Minors, development of a major writing project under the guidance of a faculty member.

Course usage information

EN-305   Shakespeare ICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT, and permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): WT

Shakespeare's life and times; theatrical conventions of the Elizabethan stage; close reading of dramatic poetry in representative early comedies, histories and tragedies.

Course usage information

EN-306   Shakespeare IICredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): WT

Shakespeare's life and times, his dramatic technique, and the conventions of the Elizabethan stage, with emphasis on the later tragedies and romances.

Course usage information

EN-307   Middle English LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Arthurian legends, dream visions, and the beginnings of English drama, from the twelfth through fifteenth centuries, in translation or in Middle English.

Course usage information

EN-309   Renaissance in EnglandCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Poetry, prose, and drama from the reign of Elizabeth I through the Protectorate, excluding Shakespeare. Authors may include: Spenser, Marlowe, Webster, Sidney, Bacon, Donne, Milton, and Marvell.

Course usage information

EN-310   Restoration and Augustan LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Survey of British poetry, prose and drama from the Restoration to the late eighteenth century, with special attention to genre and the development of the novel. Authors may include: Behn, Defore, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Burney, Gray, Leapor, Austen, and Cowper.

Course usage information

EN-312   British Romantic LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

The romantic involvement with self, including major poets and prose writers from Blake through Shelley.

Course usage information

EN-315   British Victorian LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

The post-romantic literature of crisis among the Victorians. Authors may include: Carlyle, Tennyson, the Brontes, and Browning.

Course usage information

EN-316   Modern British and Irish LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

British and Irish writers from the 1890's through the Second World War, including W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and Stevie Smith.

Course usage information

EN-318   Contemporary British and Irish LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

British and Irish writers since the Second World War, including Samuel Beckett, Philip Larkin, and Seamus Heaney.

Course usage information

EN-324   Literature of Colonial AmericaCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Major genres, texts, and narratives of the early Americas, from exploration and conquest to colonization. May include Native American narrative and poetry as well as the following writers: Cabeza de Vaca, John Smith, Mary Rowlandson, William Bradford, Anne Bradstreet, Jonathan Edwards, Edward Taylor, Benjamin Franklin, William Byrd, and Sarah Kemble Knight.

Course usage information

EN-327   Mid-Nineteenth Century American LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Literature of the United States from the rise of transcendentalism to the Civil War. Authors may include: Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Stowe, Douglass, Melville, and Hawthorne.

Course usage information

EN-329   American RealismCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

American literature from 1870 to 1910, emphasizing developments in realistic fiction and poetry.

Course usage information

EN-331   Twentieth Century African American LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An overview of African American poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction in the context of the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights movement, the African American feminist movement, and the new African American Renaissance, while considering the contemporary events and literary movements that affected the writers. Authors include McKay, Hurston, Hughes, Baldwin, Morrison, Walker, Angelou, Wilson.

Course usage information

EN-332   Modern American LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

American writers from World War I to World War II, including Willa Cather, William Faulkner, Robert Frost, and Richard Wright.

Course usage information

EN-334   Contemporary American LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

American writers from World War II to the present, including Arthur Miller, James Baldwin, John Updike, and Elizabeth Bishop.

Course usage information

EN-341   Twentieth Century South Asian LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): CC, RE

Examines twentieth-century fiction, poetry, and essays by writers from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka to consider the style and form they use to comment upon issues of nationalism, identity, anti-imperial sentiment, and modernization.

Course usage information

EN-342   Children's and Young Adult LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102 and three credits from courses with a course type of LIT.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Examines contemporary chapter books, pre-adolescent illustrated texts, and young adult literature, including realism, fantasy, and science fiction, as well as poetry. Through an exploration of representative authors, works, genres, and criticism, the course emphasizes trends and developments in literature written for children and youth. An introduction to basic bibliographic tools and review media is included. Authors studied may include: Maurice Sendak, Roald Dahl, E.B. White, J.K. Rowling, Jack Prelutsky, Lemony Snicket, Sandra Disneros, and winners of the Caldecott and Newberry Medals. English 342 does not fulfill the 300-level English elective requirement for English majors.

Course usage information

EN-352   Craft of WritingCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: EN-251 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ENCWU

An in-depth study of the creative writing process, either single - or multi - genre. Students may develop a craft workbook that focuses on both traditional and contemporary literary forms and strategies. Students write by assignment and develop techniques of reviewing in order to compare and contrast major authors' aesthetics with their own creative gestures. A final portfolio may consist of approximately thirty pages of revised fiction, nonfiction, or drama, or approximately fifteen pages of revised poetry, or twenty to twenty-five pages, revised, of some combination of genres agreed upon between the student and the professor. The collection should be titled and given a cohesive arrangement. Repeatable once for credit, with departmental permission. Open only to students with a creative writing concentration and minor only.

Course usage information

EN-373   The Art and Practice of PersuasionCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, and three credits from any course with a designation of LIT.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Classical and contemporary perspectives on the nature, functions, and scope of persuasion and rhetoric. Potential print and visual texts for analysis include but are not limited to non-fiction prose, novels, short fiction, speeches, films, video clips, and Web sites.

Course usage information

EN-384   Language and CommunityCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EX5

Students will learn theories and best practices of tutoring and will apply them in literacy activities in community settings. Will convene in three chronological formats: training of how to tutor, internship hours, and reflection on application of tutoring theories in the internship hours. This course does not qualify as a 300+ English elective.

Course usage information

EN-388   Cooperative Education: EnglishCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: Completion of all required 100- and 200-level EN courses and at least two EN electives at the 200-level or higher; permission of department chair may also be required.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX2

Integration and application of knowledge gained in the academic setting with career-related or community experiences. Work in an external setting, meeting at least three times in the semester with a faculty sponsor from the English department to establish reasonable goals and expectations for the experience, to determine progress at or near the mid-term and to make the final presentation-oral and written-for evaluation. This course may be repeated for credit.

Course usage information

EN-389   Intern in EnglishCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: Departmental approval and Junior standing.

Course Type(s): EX1

Supervised practical experience in English; repeatable for credit.

Course usage information

EN-398   Special Topics in English (300 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: Three credits from courses with a course type of "LIT", or permission of the instructor.

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in English to be announced prior to registration.

Course usage information

EN-399   Independent Study in EnglishCredits: 1-3   

Course Type(s): None

Reading and research on a selected topic under the direction of an English department faculty member. Instructor's consent required.

Course usage information

EN-405   ChaucerCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Selections from the Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and short poems in Middle English.

Course usage information

EN-410   What is a Book?Credits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): WT

A study of texts and codices in the transitions from manuscript to print and from print to digital which serves as a basis for exploring what can be both lost and gained in our current movement to digital transmission.

Course usage information

EN-414   Place and Space in American LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Defines and differentiates spaces and places in various genres of American literature and explores how select texts reflect aspects of American regions, time periods, literary groups, culture, politics, history, aesthetics, identity, and/or mores. Students will analyze and interpret what diverse places and spaces represent and will apply theory about space and place in their evaluation of select literature.

Course usage information

EN-415   New Jersey LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

An advanced survey of New Jersey literary history from the Colonial period to the present.

Course usage information

EN-416   Secret Gardens: Classic Children's LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

English-language children's literature, focusing on "Golden Age" illustrated narratives by authors such as Nesbit, Burnett, Milne, and Grahame, but also including poetry and earlier prose fiction by Carroll and Alcott.

Course usage information

EN-417   Writing World War II In BritainCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Major poems and prose of World War II Britain that treat the Battle of Britain, the Blitz, the Holocaust, and the North Africa campaign.

Course usage information

EN-421   African Diaspora LiteraturesCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): RE

The study of the twentieth century literatures of worldwide African Diaspora. Primary texts will be drawn from different genres - prose, poetry, and drama - and will represent the different shores and locations of African Diasporas worldwide.

Course usage information

EN-424   Postmodern LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Explores the works of key figures in postmodern American and/or British literature and includes a study of theoretical structures and cultural changes that help define literary postmodernism.

Course usage information

EN-425   Postcolonial LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): RE

Selected literary representations of colonial and postcolonial discourses in literature, theory, and criticism. Focus on creative representation from African nations, the Caribbean, and the Indian Subcontinent.

Course usage information

EN-426   The Short Story in EnglishCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Development of the short story genre in English from the eighteenth century to the present, including critical readings.

Course usage information

EN-427   Contemporary PoetryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Analysis of selected, recent poets to evaluate developments in contemporary verse.

Course usage information

EN-428   Novel in EnglishCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

The development of long prose fiction from the eighteenth century to the present, with consideration of criticism that defines the novel as a genre.

Course usage information

EN-430   Nature of TragedyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Tragic literature in various genres and periods from the ancient Greeks to the present.

Course usage information

EN-431   Contemporary Women NovelistsCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): GS

Critical analysis of selected novels from both literary and feminist perspectives.

Course usage information

EN-441   Criticism and TheoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Classic literary criticism and/or contemporary critical theory from Aristotle to Coleridge, Marx to Derrida, addressing how, why, and what we read.

Course usage information

EN-442   Language and LinguisticsCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A grounding in the structural aspects of general linguistics: morphology, syntax, semantics, phonology, and pragmatics. Examines the structure of the English language, including nouns and noun classes, ways of talking about actions and states, how ideas are combined into complex sentences, and how context and purpose affect how we use language. Also considers differences between learning a first and second language.

Course usage information

EN-443   History of the English LanguageCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The development of the English language from its Indo-European roots to the present, including both linguistic and cultural factors in language change.

Course usage information

EN-451   Advanced Creative WritingCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-226 and EN-251 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ENCWU

Students analyze in a workshop-setting longer works (long poems and/or poetic-sequences; novellas; plays; creative nonfiction) in American and World literature to observe techniques in craft, and present their own capacious, sustained, and at times self-generative creative writings for intensive full-revised and cohesive final portfolio of a length appropriate to the genre. Open only to students with a creative writing concentration or minor only. This course may be repeated once for credit.

Course usage information

EN-470   Theory and Practice of WritingCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Instruction in theories of expressive and expository writing and integration of language skills, with a focus on writing process research and its applications. Cannot be taken as an English 300+ elective. Limited to Education or Special Education majors only.

Course usage information

EN-474   Approaches to Composition TheoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Instructions in the foundations of composition theory, with a focus on writing process research and its applications. Cannot be taken as an English 300+ elective. Limited to Education or Special Education majors only.

Course usage information

EN-475   Writing and New MediaCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, one LIT designated course, and two WT designated courses in any major.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A study of theories and concepts of writing and rhetoric in digital media with emphasis on the uses of verbal and visual media in digital spaces, such as Web sites, blogs, and wikis. Topics examined include authorship, narrative, and multimedia participation, design, and creation.

Course usage information

EN-488   Cooperative Education: EnglishCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: Completion of all required 100-and 200-level EN courses and at least two EN electives at the 200-level or higher; permission of department chair may also be required.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX2

Integration and application of knowledge gained in the academic setting with career-related or community experiences. Work in an external setting, meeting at least three times in the semester with a faculty sponsor from the English department to establish reasonable goals and expectations for the experience, to determine progress at or near the mid-term and to make the final presentation- oral and written-for evaluation. This course may be repeated for credit.

Course usage information

EN-489   Internship in EnglishCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: Departmental approval and Junior standing.

Course Type(s): EX1

Supervised practical experience in English; repeatable for credit.

Course usage information

EN-491   Seminar in EnglishCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A concentrated study on a single author, a related group of authors, or a single topic or theme, which includes the production of a scholarly paper based on substantial, independent research. This course is repeatable for credit.

Course usage information

EN-498   Special Topics in English (400 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-226, three credits from any course with a designation of LIT and one course from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in English to be announced prior to registration.

Course usage information

EN-499   Independent Study in EnglishCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisites: EN-101, EN-102, EN-201 or EN-202, EN-226, plus two courses from EN-227 or EN-228 or EN-229, or written permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Reading and research on a selected topic under the direction of an English Department faculty member.