Anthropology

Chair: Richard Veit, Department of History and Anthropology 

The Anthropology curriculum is designed to provide a liberal arts education that emphasizes the scientific study of humanity. Three areas of Anthropology are covered:

  • Cultural Anthropology, the comparative study of human beliefs and behavior with special attention to non-Western societies;
  • Archaeology, the study of the human cultural heritage from its prehistoric beginnings to the recent past; and
  • Biological Anthropology, the study of racial variation and the physical and behavioral evolution of the human species.

The goal of the Anthropology program is to provide students with a broad understanding of humanity that will be relevant to their professions, their daily lives, and their larger roles in the modern world.

Student Honor Society: Lambda Alpha, Alpha Chapter

Heidi Bludau, Lecturer. BA, MEd, Texas AM University; MA, PhD, Indiana University. Research interests include transnationalism and migration of healthcare workers, globalization and health, professional identify, post-socialism, and Europe. Teaching areas include medical anthropology, globalization, applied anthropology, ethnographic methods, and anthropology of food.
nbludau@monmouth.edu

Veronica Davidov, Assistant Professor and Anthropology Graduate Program Director (Graduate Faculty). PhD, New York University. Areas of research interest include cultures of Latin America and ecotourism in the Amazon. Teaching focus includes anthropological theory, ethnographic methods, area studies (Latin American), political ecology, and globalization.
vdavidov@monmouth.edu

Hillary DelPrete, Assistant Professor (Graduate Faculty). BS, Tulane University; MA, PhD, Rutgers University. Professor DelPrete is a biological anthropologist with a specialization in modern evolution. Teaching and research interests include human evolution, human variation, human behavioral ecology, and anthropometrics.
hdelpret@monmouth.edu

Stanton M. Green, Professor (Graduate Faculty). BA, New York University; MA, PhD, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Professor Green is a specialist in Baseball and American Culture, Archaeology, and Ireland. His research and teaching interests include questions of diversity in the United States, archeological methods and theory, and the application of Geographic Information Systems.
sgreen@monmouth.edu

Richard F. Veit, Professor and Chair (Graduate Faculty). BA, Drew University; MA, College of William and Mary; PhD, University of Pennsylvania. Teaching areas include archaeology, historic preservation, North American Indians, and New Jersey history. Research interests include historical archaeology, industrial archaeology, and early American Material Culture. Author of Digging New Jersey’s Past: Historical Archaeology in the Garden State.
rveit@monmouth.edu

Course usage information

AN-103   Cultural AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): SS.SV

Introduction to comparative study of human beliefs and behavior. Emphasis on the concepts used in studying human culture; analysis of non-Western societies with respect to ecology, economy, social and political organization, religion, and art; implications for American society.

Course usage information

AN-104   Introduction to Biological AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HE.EL, HEPE, SS.SV

Introduction to physical anthropology; racial variation and the evolutionary origins of the human species; concepts and principles used in the study of living and fossil evidence for human evolution and genetic diversity; unique influence of culture on human biology; human evolution in the present and future.

Course usage information

AN-107   Introduction to ArchaeologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): SS.SV

Introduction to archaeological techniques, concepts, and principles; recovery and interpretation of evidence; examples from the prehistoric cultures of the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Course usage information

AN-113   Cultures of the WorldCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): BI.EL, GU, SS.SV

Common and distinctive features of culture in each of several broad zones around the world, including native North America, native South America, northern Asia, southern Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa; descriptive overview with emphasis on the variety of human experience and achievement.

Course usage information

AN-198   Special Topics in Anthropology (100 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in anthropology to be announced prior to registration. The course may be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

AN-220   History of AdvertisingCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GS, HSUS

Designed to develop a critical understanding of the historical evolution of advertising in the United States, with critical attention to race, class, gender, and sexuality. We will explore the economic, political, and cultural factors that have contributed to the development of advertising, and which have been affected by advertising. Some of the topics to be discussed include: the rise of national advertising; the relation of advertising to consumption; advertising to children; political advertising, the relationship between advertisers and the medium in which they appear (magazines, television, radio, etc.) and broadcast and internet advertising. Also listed as HS-220 and GS-220.

Course usage information

AN-251   Primate Behavior and Human EvolutionCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Behavior of the human species' closest relatives with emphasis on chimpanzees, other apes, and Old World monkeys; social life, ecological adaptations, psychological mechanisms; evolutionary origins of human behavior.

Course usage information

AN-263   Peoples and Cultures of South AmericaCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: AN-103 or AN-113.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): RE

A social and cultural survey of representative peoples in South America and the Caribbean, emphasizing the comparative study of economic, political, social, and religious organization.

Course usage information

AN-264   North American IndiansCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, RE

A survey of the cultural, social and linguistic diversity of Pre-Columbian North American societies; problems of contemporary Indian groups. Also listed as HS-264.

Course usage information

AN-266   Historical ArchaeologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: AN-103 or HS-201; and EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): WT

An introduction to historical archaeology, the archaeology of the modern world (c. 1492+). It focuses on archaeological sites in the United States. Students are introduced to the various written and material sources that historical archaeologists use to interpret the recent past, including artifacts, vernacular architecture, grave markers, documents, photographs, and other visual sources. Archaeological field methods are also introduced with a minimum of one class period spent excavating an archaeological site. Also listed as HS-266.

Course usage information

AN-267   Tourism Around the WorldCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): BI.EL, GU, SUS

Introductory examination of the various factors that impact tourism in different parts of the world. Students will consider political, social, economic, cultural, and environmental factors that affect tourists, local populations, and the physical destinations. Also listed as GO-267.

Course usage information

AN-268   Urbanization Around the WorldCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, SUS

An introduction to urbanization on a global scale. Historical and contemporary development of the world's cities using geographical approaches to urban analysis. Includes examination of urban forms and the local global, social, cultural, economic, political, and physical processes that shape and are shaped by cities, and the large and rapidly growing cities of the developing world that dominate and control the global economy. Also listed as GO-268.

Course usage information

AN-272   Magic, Witchcraft, and ReligionCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: EN-101 and EN-102 permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): WT

Explores motivation of human behavior within the realm of religion and the supernatural with an emphasis on the role of gods and goddesses. A cross-cultural approach will be used while exploring cultures both past and present across the globe. Also listed as RS-272.

Course usage information

AN-274   Anthropology of Sex and GenderCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: AN-103.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GS

Anthropological perspectives on sexuality and gender; emergence of human sexuality and gender differentiation in the context of species evolution; cross-cultural survey of social and ideological aspects of sexuality and gender.

Course usage information

AN-275   Global Environmental ProblemsCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, SUS

Focus on the complex relationship between human beings and their environments in an effort to build an ecological perspective in a global framework. Discussion of basic issues of ecological science in terms of impact on both the Western and non-Western worlds. Also listed as GO-275.

Course usage information

AN-278   Maritime ArchaeologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A mid-level seminar that examines maritime archaeology, with a focus on North America and particularly New Jersey. As part of this course, students will explore the world of maritime archaeology through readings, fieldwork, lectures, and hands-on exercises. It will include fieldwork on Monmouth's research vessel, work with a submersible, and lab work with shipwreck artifacts.

Course usage information

AN-279   Culture, Health and IllnessCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, HE.EL, HEPE, WT

A cross-cultural examination of health and healing from the view of applied medical anthropology. Explores biological, sociocultural, political economic, and structural factors that affect health, illness, and disease both now and in the past. Cultural areas of study include: populations in the United States, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Southeast Asia.

Course usage information

AN-280   Anthropology and EducationCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102; or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): WT

The Anthropology of Education has a long and rich history of exploring intersections of learning and culture. This course is an introduction to the issues and approaches central to the study of education within the discipline of anthropology. Over the course of the semester, students will engage with classic and contemporary methods and readings in the field, including cross-cultural approaches to schooling and key issues in educational policy. This course is founded in anthropological approaches to education and how anthropologists address topics related to learning.

Course usage information

AN-282   Life's a BeachCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD

A majority of the world's population lives along shorelines. In some places, the shore is necessary for survival, a place where people depend on their interactions with the natural environment to provide for their daily needs. Elsewhere, the beach is a location for leisure, a destination for tourists. This class examines life at the shore from the different perspectives of those who utilize the beaches in different ways. Approximately one-third of the class will take place in situ, meaning off campus and on site of some local beach location. Applying anthropological theories and methods to the topic, this course will examine concepts such as identity, political economy, cultural ecology and development, using New Jersey beaches as locus. Also listed as GO-282.

Course usage information

AN-288   Cooperative Education: Anthropology ConcentrationCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: AN-103 and Junior or Senior standing.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX2

Provides students with an opportunity to apply classroom theory in practice through actual work experience. Placements are selected to forward the student's career interest through experiential education. This course is repeatable for credit.

Course usage information

AN-290   Popular Culture and the Middle EastCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, HSNW

Examines recent events, traditional cultural practices, and the perceptions of the Middle East through the lens of popular media (film, graphic novels, journalism, etc.). Topics to be covered may include but are not limited to: religion, the Arab Spring (2011), the Iranian Revolution, the Arab-Israeli Conflict, women's rights/roles, Orientalism and racism, and common governing structures. Also listed as HS-290.

Course usage information

AN-296   Cultures and Societies of AfricaCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102; or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, WT

Examines the history, cultures, and societies of Africa from the precolonial to the contemporary period. Discusses the cultural, political, and economic changes that have taken place in Africa as a result of Western influence. Also listed as HS-296.

Course usage information

AN-298   Special Topics in Anthropology (200 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in Anthropology to be announced prior to registration. The course may be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

AN-299   Independent Study in AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Student must be an Anthropology major and have at least a 2.50 GPA.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Guided readings on a topic not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Prior permission of the directing professor and department required.

Course usage information

AN-303   Archaeology of the Southeastern United StatesCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU

This course offers an overview of the archaeology of the American Southeast. The course will focus on the region's prehistoric and contact periods, which is one of the richest in the US. Students will develop an understanding of the area's primary archaeological cultures and their geographic and temporal extents.

Course usage information

AN-304   Monuments and Commemoration: Loss and RemembranceCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSUS

Examines the evolution of American attitudes towards commemoration and remembrance from the colonial period to the present. Focuses on the analysis of landscapes and artifacts, e.g. monuments, grave markers, cemeteries, and historic sites. Topics discussed include: the evolution of American burial grounds from colonial burial grounds to the rural cemeteries of the Victorians and modern memorial parks. Changing grave marker designs and iconography are examined. Distinct ethnic, regional, and national memorial practices are also studied. Public memorials in the form of statuary, commemorative institutions, and historic sites will also be discussed. There will be field trips to select sites. Also listed as HS-304.

Course usage information

AN-305   Caribbean ArchaeologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, RE

Students are introduced to the archaeology and ethnohistory of the Caribbean Islands; the region where the Old World violently encountered the New World in AD 1492. The general approach is historical and chronological. This course is divided into two broad sections covering the prehistoric and historic periods of the region. The encounter between Europe and the region's native inhabitants proved catastrophic for the later. The region than became central to the world economy through slave labor and the production of luxury for world markets.

Course usage information

AN-306   Food and CultureCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102; or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, WT

Augments the anthropology program's offerings in both archaeology and socio-cultural anthropology, and demonstrates the synergy of these approaches in the topical study of food. Through a combination of lecture, discussion, hands-on learning, and readings, students are introduced to the basic modes of human subsistence identified by the anthropological tradition. They also will explore the material and social challenges connected with these different subsistence strategies, and finish up by looking at current food-based problems facing the world today.

Course usage information

AN-307   Forensic AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

Introduces students to the basic principles of forensic anthropology. Forensic anthropology is an application of biological anthropology (Skeletal understanding) to help solve criminal cases. Topics that will be covered in this course schedule include: methods of determining sex, nutrition, stature and ancestry from skeletal remains. We will also explore the cause of death, time since death and other relevant information. In addition we will examine the changing the role of forensic anthropology in a larger global context.

Course usage information

AN-311   Anthropology Internship SeminarCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX1

Application of theory learned in the classroom in practice through actual work experience. Includes both academic and experiential learning. Eight to twelve hours per week in a public history or field work setting. Open only to anthropology majors. Also listed as HS-311.

Course usage information

AN-315   Field Research in ArchaeologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: AN-103 or AN-107; or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX5

Archaeological field methods, analysis of data, and anthropological interpretation; students will do supervised work on local sites. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Also listed as HS-315.

Course usage information

AN-321   Qualitative Research MethodsCredits: 4   

Prerequisite: PY-103.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): WT

An interdisciplinary overview of qualitative research methods employed in the social sciences and education. Qualitative methods are offered as an alternative way of knowing about individuals and groups. Topics covered include: theory, fieldwork, interviewing, observational studies, time sampling, writing field notes, questionnaires(survey research), archival research, and conducting qualitative research in various settings. Emphasis also placed upon the factors that affect the fieldwork process (e.g., gender, emotions, etc.) Also listed as PY-321.

Course usage information

AN-322   Ethnographic MethodsCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): WT

An overview of ethnographic research design and methods employed in anthropology. Students will practice research design and methods, data analysis and write-up techniques. Students will engage questions of ethics through research practice and theoretical discussion.

Course usage information

AN-335   A History of the Ancient Near EastCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: HS-101.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HSAS, HSNW, HSPRE

A survey of the history and culture of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt and their Near Eastern neighbors from the rise of the first literate urban societies through the conquests of Alexander the Great and the Successors. The focus will be on an examination of the preserved material culture, including texts, art, and architecture as revealed through archaeology. Also listed as HS-335.

Course usage information

AN-342   Children's Play and CultureCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: PY-203 or EDL-206.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

An intensive examination of children's play. Theoretical and empirical contributions from psychology and anthropology as a developmental and cross-cultural foundation for the following topics: the historical development of the concept of childhood; theories of play; conceptions of play and work; the functions of play; play and child development; gender differences; cross-cultural forms of play; and children's peer cultures. Also listed as PY-342.

Course usage information

AN-342L   Children's Play Thesis LaboratoryCredits: 1   

Prerequisites: PY-311, PY-320, and PY-321, passed with a grade of "C" or higher.

Corequisite: AN-342.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX5

Research strategies used in the study of children's play. Projects include: methods of interviewing and survey techniques, naturalistic observation, participant observation, and time sampling. Students also design and undertake their own research projects and prepare written and oral reports of their findings.

Course usage information

AN-343   Anthropology and ChildrenCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: AN-103.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU

An overview of the anthropological study of children. Addresses anthropology's inquiry into children's behavior, activities, artifacts, and their relationships with adults both past and present. Topics covered include: archaeology and children, childbirth, attachment, parenting, play, education, socialization, and child labor and welfare. Geographical areas include: the Middle East, Asia, and Central and South America. Europe and the United States are mentioned marginally.

Course usage information

AN-355   Ancient TechnologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): None

Provides an introduction to ancient technology/experimental archaeology. It examines the major theories and practices employed by experimental archaeologists. Students will develop skills in traditional technologies, e.g. flintknapping, pot firing, blacksmithing, and timber frame house construction.

Course usage information

AN-363   The AmazonCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GU, RE

An anthropological seminar focused on the Amazon region, with emphasis on how expert and lay knowledge about the Amazon has been produced and circulated.

Course usage information

AN-367   Civilizations of the AndesCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Three credits in Anthropology or Sociology; and EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): BI.EL, GU, RE, WT

A survey of the anthropological history of the Andes from the beginning of civilization through the Inca Empire to contemporary Quechua and Aymara speakers: pre-Inca societies, social and political organization of peasant culture, and the role of rural migration in transforming contemporary Andean cities. Also listed as HS-367.

Course usage information

AN-371   International Service SeminarCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: PS-101.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): EX5, PSIP

Students will learn to unite theory and practice by studying theories and policies based on human security, and learning about their applications through service-learning projects. Students will enhance their understanding of human security by volunteering in international community organizations and reflecting on the social, political, and economic factors and policies that affect them. Also listed as SW-371, PS-371, and SO-371.

Course usage information

AN-377   Archaeology of African American LifeCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, RE

Explores the rapidly growing subfield of historical archaeology which deals with the life and history of African Americans. The history and modern challenges facing this group is conditioned by the historical experience of individuals and communities of African descent with the United States. Unlike many European groups, the historical evidence documenting the experience of African Americans through time is sparse and incomplete. Archaeological investigations offer a primary method for recovering the everyday life experiences of this group. In addition, African American archaeology provides an important intersection for engaging the deep connection between the past and the present in socially meaningful ways. This course will review important case studies, key figure, major issues, and the overall development of African American archaeology.

Course usage information

AN-378   Gender, Sex and MedicineCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: EN-101 and EN-102.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): CD, GS, HE.EL, WT

Explores intersections of biological sex with cultural constructs of gender and medicine. Using cross-cultural examples, the course will employ an anthropological approach to explore how health, well-being and even medical belief systems operate in relation to different genders. Together as a class, we will examine how cultural constructs of gender frame ideals and norms regarding health, explore ways that biological sex is used to support gendered constructs, and demonstrate how these constructs eventually frame how healing takes place.

Course usage information

AN-379   Globalization, Health and HealingCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): GU, HE.EL, HEPE

Explores globalization through the lens of health and transnational movements. Through lectures, interactive seminar discussions, films, reflective analysis and research projects, students will examine globalization processes through the movement of disease and treatments, patients and healthcare workers.

Course usage information

AN-380   American Cultural DiversityCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX5, RE

Explores the historical, social, and cultural backgrounds of immigrant groups found within the United States. Through lectures, readings, case studies, and discussions incorporated with service learning as fieldwork, students will be introduced to the complexity and diversity of American society.

Course usage information

AN-382   Applied AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): EX5

This course is anthropology put to use - meaning using anthropological research and methods to solve practical problems. This is an upper-level survey course that pays attention to cultural viewpoints, methods and results. While exploring different areas of applied anthropology through the history of the discipline and contemporary research projects, we will study methods unique to this subfield. Practical information, advice and resources on career preparation and development will be offered. By the end of the course, students should be able to answer the question "How can I use anthropology in my future career?"

Course usage information

AN-383   Old World PrehistoryCredits: 3   

Course Type(s): None

An intensive survey of the prehistoric cultures of Europe, Africa, and Asia, focusing on the period between the origins of modern humans to the rise of the first civilizations. Particular attention is paid to the development of art, religious belief systems, agriculture, urbanism, metallurgy, and writing. Early civilizations in Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa, Mesopotamia, Western Europe, and China are examined.

Course usage information

AN-387   Visual AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): CD, COSS

Deals with aspects of visuality in culture and anthropology. A significant part of the course will be devoted to visual anthropology. We will learn about the development of visual anthropology as a discipline, the particular problems and challenges involved in practicing this type of ethnography, the evolution of ideas about accountability, representation, reflexivity and positioning in visual ethnographic methods. We will start with exploring the role of image in anthropology by considering the relationship between photography and ethnography, and continue to study ethnographic filmmaking, from Robert Flaherty's "Nanook of the North," (considered to be the first ethnographic documentary), to the development of Cinema Verite, to the emergence of indigenous media. Students will gain a nuanced understanding of the subject through weekly writing exercises, presentations, and in-class discussion. For a final project, students will write a long-form paper that will combine original research and visual analysis.

Course usage information

AN-388   Cooperative Education: Anthropology ConcentrationCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: AN-103 and Junior or Senior standing.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX2

Provides students with an opportunity to apply classroom theory in practice through actual work experience. Placements are selected to forward the student's career interest through experiential education.

Course usage information

AN-389   Anthropological Field StudyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Six credits in Anthropology.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX1

Supervised field experience in various branches of anthropology, e.g., archaeological excavation, museum work, ethnography, and primate behavior.

Course usage information

AN-390   Archaeology Field StudyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX5

An introduction to the practice of archaeology with a focus on fieldwork and limited laboratory analysis. This is a residential field school, meaning that students will live at or near the site for the majority of the semester. This might include living nearby during the week or for several weeks at a time, as in the case of an international archaeological field project. Students will learn traditional and advanced surveying methods, how to conduct pedestrian surveys, standard archaeological excavation techniques, and how to identify, catalogue, and analyze artifacts. There will be weekly lectures on the archaeology, history, and culture of the chosen archaeological site by project staff and visiting experts.

Course usage information

AN-398   Special Topics in Archaeology (300 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in anthropology to be announced prior to registration. The course may be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

AN-401   Anthropological TheoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: AN-103 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A survey of the major theories in anthropology from the nineteenth century to the present, focusing on contributions to our understanding of human society by some of the major figures of anthropology.

Course usage information

AN-408   Cultural PsychologyCredits: 3   

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

An interdisciplinary course that utilizes theoretical, empirical, and methodological contributions from psychology and anthropology to discuss the position of culture in understanding human behavior and thought. Culture is viewed as a cognitive construct that is learned, lived, shared, and performed. A sample of topics include: the history of cultural and cross-cultural psychology, methodological approaches, aggression, education, development, play, language, social relationships, intelligence, emotion, motivation, and mental health issues. Also listed as PY-408.

Course usage information

AN-425   Latin American SeminarCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: AN-103 or permission of the instructor and EN-101 and EN-102 or permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): RE, WT

An in-depth analysis of select groups in Native Latin America, through lectures, readings, case studies, film, and interactive panel discussions.

Course usage information

AN-426   Research Seminar in AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): RD

The development, research, and writing of a BA paper on any aspect of anthropology, with special emphasis on scrupulous documentation, use of appropriate sources, clear expository writing, and oral presentation of research results. The course will be taught as a mixture of seminar and one-on-one meetings with the instructor. (It will also include a meeting with a librarian or bibliographer from the Monmouth University Library.)

Course usage information

AN-488   Cooperative Education: AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: AN-103 and Junior or Senior standing.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX2

Provides students with an opportunity to apply classroom theory in practice through actual work experience. Placements are selected to forward the student's career interest through experiential education. Repeatable for credit.

Course usage information

AN-489   Anthropological Field StudyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Six credits in Anthropology and permission of the instructor.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): EX1

Supervised field experience in various branches of anthropology, e.g., archaeological excavation, museum work, ethnography, and primate behavior. This course may be repeated once for credit.

Course usage information

AN-498   Special Topics in Anthropology (400 Level)Credits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: As announced in the course schedule.

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in anthropology to be announced prior to registration. The course may be conducted on either a lecture-discussion or a seminar basis.

Course usage information

AN-499   Independent Study in AnthropologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisites: Student must be an Anthropology major and have at least a 2.50 GPA.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Guided readings on a topic not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Prior permission of the directing professor and department is required.