Perspectives (PR)

Course usage information

PR-400   Love, Life, and LibertyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

An examination of the historical and philosophical aspects of love and the assertion for freedom, starting from the biological concept of life. Throughout history, the various interpretations of these ideas have shaped the world. Students will be introduced to some of the most important, related works that are the fiber of History, Philosophy, and Science. The analysis of revered, cultural traditions will show the impact of love on the rational thinking and artistic creation. Also listed as RS-400.

Course usage information

PR-401   PerceptionsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GS, ISP

An in-depth visual study dealing with the various ways that artists perceive the world around them as it relates to specific subject matter, aesthetics, and to cultural, historical, and psychological implications. Beauty and reality will be examined in all categories studied, with emphasis on the personal perceptions of the student.

Course usage information

PR-402   Witchcraft and MagicCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The meanings, origins, and historical significance of beliefs in witchcraft and magic in Europe, America, and selected traditional societies. Includes the relationship between religion, magic, and witchcraft and the reasons for the decline in witchcraft beliefs. The disciplines represented include History and Anthropology.

Course usage information

PR-403   Roma/Gypsies in Literature, Pop Culture, and HistoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): ISP

Offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the people known as Gypsies (though the preferred term is Roma or Romani), whose ancestors left northern India by the Eleventh century, and who presently live dispersed in a world-wide diaspora. We will examine representations of Gypsies in world literature, pop culture, and history, and investigate this people's position at the confluence of myth, metaphor, and reality. We will discuss the particulars of Roma's history, including origins, migrations, experiences with slavery and the Holocaust, and their position within the New Europe. Special attention will be paid to the relation between historical and non-historical representations, and to the production of stereotypes and tropes associated with Gypsies/Roma.

Course usage information

PR-404   Ethnic LivesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Institutional racism in America, its effect on intergroup relations, and the response of ethnic group members to it. Ethnicity in America is examined from a global perspective. Readings in Sociology and Literature.

Course usage information

PR-405   Toxic WastesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Examination of the nature of toxic wastes in New Jersey, how waste dumps are sited, the basic chemistry and toxicology of dump components, the impact on people and the environment, the development of public policy for control and cleanup of Superfund sites in New Jersey, and implications for the future and the world. The disciplines represented include Chemistry, Economics, and Political Science.

Course usage information

PR-406   The Individual and SocietyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

The impact of two cultural ideologies; the influence of individualism and collectivism on individual thought and behavior, social interaction, societal values, and global order. The disciplines represented include Psychology, Ethics, Cultural Anthropology, and Sociology.

Course usage information

PR-407   Morality and CommunityCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GS, ISP

Problems involved in making moral decisions in complex situations. Focuses on lying and deceit, deleterious effects on the life of the community, and also on clarifying codes of ethical behavior. The disciplines represented include Literature and Ethics.

Course usage information

PR-408   The Jewish ExperienceCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The impact of "modernity" upon the Jewish people and the religion of the Jews. Delineates the course of modern Jewish religious philosophy through an examination of its characteristic problems and varying approaches to their solutions. The perspectives stressed are History and Philosophy of Religion.

Course usage information

PR-409   Communicating with ComputersCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The historical development of computer communication, analysis of high-level languages, and educational functions of computer communication; related research and projects, together with computer lab demonstration.

Course usage information

PR-410   Architecture in History as Art and TechnologyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): ARHIS

An exploration of structure, symbolism, and social meaning in architecture from imperial Rome, medieval France, Renaissance Italy, and Europe and America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The disciplines represented include Art and Technology.

Course usage information

PR-411   Gender and Global CultureCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): GS, ISP

Examines how gender influences cultural beliefs and practices around the world. Examines how gender shapes culture, particularly in ways that restrict and limit our lives. Uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine how gender and culture shape individual lives, as well as the larger global communities in which we live. Throughout the course, students will examine ethical and social issues concerning gender and culture.

Course usage information

PR-412   Education, Equality, and ElitismCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Tensions between equality and elitism in education; consideration of inequalities in educational systems, proposed remedies; historical models; accounts of issues of race, gender, and class; and critiques of American education in terms of its international competitiveness. Disciplines represented are Philosophy and Education, with supporting materials from Literature.

Course usage information

PR-413   Population Dynamics and a Sustainable FutureCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): SUS

An exploration of the complex and interrelated issues of population dynamics, resource consumption, socioeconomic development, environmental protection, and global interdependence.

Course usage information

PR-414   Parent Child Socialization: A Cross-Cultural ApproachCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive, cross-cultural investigation of childhood socialization. Topics include: socialization, enculturation, sex-role socialization, and socialization processes in various cultures, such as China, Japan, Polynesia, and the United States. Disciplines represented include Psychology and Cultural Anthropology united through cross-cultural methods.

Course usage information

PR-415   Technology and Women's LivesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): GS

The impact of modern technology in women's lives. The aspects to be examined in depth include technology and the workplace (employment), technology and the home (housework), and technology and reproduction (contraception, pregnancy, and infertility). The disciplines represented include Sociology and Ethics.

Course usage information

PR-416   Management and Liberal ArtsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Course Type(s): None

Exploration and comparison of the development and context through literature of real issues faced by managers in the public and private sectors. .

Course usage information

PR-418   Eastern-Western Approaches to Wellness, Health, and HealingCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HE.EL, HEPE, ISP

Exploration and comparison of Eastern and Western approaches to wellness, health, and healing, known currently as the "mind/body question." Examination of how beliefs inherent in these traditions influence concepts of health and disease.

Course usage information

PR-419   Mathematics of Artistic DesignCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Exploration of the mathematics that may be used to describe and create some artistic designs in architecture, sculptures, paintings, and other sources. Appropriate mathematical concepts from topology, number theory, symmetry groups, the geometries, and the calculi will be discussed and studied. Original, artistic designs will be created, employing mathematical concepts and computer software.

Course usage information

PR-420   Society and Technology of InformationCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

The technology of communication systems and its impact on society's growth, with emphasis on the printing press, television, and the computer. The disciplines represented include Science, History, Economics, and Sociology.

Course usage information

PR-422   AIDS and the Global SocietyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HE.EL, HEPE, ISP, NU.EL

A global perspective of the HIV/AIDS pandemic using three major disciplinary approaches of biology, public health, and social anthropology. The impact of the disease on individuals, families, and communities in Western and non-Western countries; associated social, psychological, ethical, economic, and health issues are explored.

Course usage information

PR-423   Perspectives on Human RightsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An interdisciplinary and cross-cultural exploration of the question of human rights. The disciplinary perspectives of Philosophy, Political Science, History, and Literature are used to examine the different dimensions of human rights in the world.

Course usage information

PR-424   Place, Identity, and BehaviorCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Integrates geography and psychology in order to examine the interrelationship of people with geographic places that are experienced directly through residence, work, and travel, and indirectly through media, family stories, and education.

Course usage information

PR-425   Critical Play: Theories and Aesthetics of Video GamesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): ISP

Critical examination of the role of video games and play toward the construction of cultural values, social structures, and identities. This interdisciplinary course studies the theories and aesthetics of video games by drawing from the fields that include, but are not limited to: Art and Art History, Anthropology, and Sociology.

Course usage information

PR-426   Contemporary Issues in Free SpeechCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Global study of free speech that offers an interdisciplinary examination of the evolution of political and personal freedom. Examination of Western history, comparison of non-Western freedoms, and consideration of the philosophical arguments that have raged over centuries about the degree of freedom individuals should have.

Course usage information

PR-427   Ideas in the Art of Asian CivilizationCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): None

An exploration of how ideas associated with Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto influenced and shaped painting, sculpture, architecture, and some minor arts in traditional India, China, and Japan.

Course usage information

PR-428   Children's FolkloreCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

An investigation of the theoretical perspectives of development psychologists, anthropologists, and comparative historians. Working in the field of Literary Studies, students will learn to analyze children's folklore with theoretical and methodological tools borrowed from the disciplines of anthropology, psychology, and comparative historical analysis. Topics include: rhymes, riddles, jokes, songs, lore, and other language use in American children and children from other cultural groups.

Course usage information

PR-429   Health and Healing Across CulturesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

A cross-cultural examination of health and healing. Through lecture, discussion of the readings, case studies, and film presentations, students will explore the biological and sociocultural factors that affect health, illness, disease, and healing, both now and in the past. Students will also examine the impact of the healer and supernatural belief systems on the process of healing. In addition to the evaluation of the cultural health aspects of Africans, African-Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Haitians, and the Hmong, these populations will also be compared to the general American population in terms of overall health and access to health care.

Course usage information

PR-431   Popular Culture and Scientific DiscourseCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

A study in the ideological influences of science on American society and culture, with a special emphasis on how scientific language is presented, packaged, and distorted for public consumption.

Course usage information

PR-432   Ethics and Professionalism in Science and EngineeringCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Provides a broad view of ethics and professionalism in the context of Science and Engineering. Teaches valuable practical skills, as well as the basic analytic tools required to make the ethical decisions confronted by professionals in any field. Describes the special role of professionals in society and uses the key perspectives of engineering and philosophy to explore their responsibilities. Additional perspectives, e.g., organizational psychology and law, will be incorporated as appropriate. A key course dynamic will be the interplay between producers and consumers of technology as common ethical dilemmas are approached from both viewpoints. The topics covered will include: problem solving in the context of ethics and codes of conduct, professional societies, working as a member of a team and international issues, as well as how to be a productive and contributing professional.

Course usage information

PR-433   Death and DyingCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): HE.EL, HEPE, ISP, NU.EL

A study of attempts to understand the meaning of death and the cultural practices that surround death and dying. The disciplines represented include: bioethics, literature, and philosophy.

Course usage information

PR-434   Immigration and the United StatesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Traces the historical experience of immigrants in the U.S., examines their place in the stratification system, the forms of prejudice and discrimination they have encountered, and their patterns of assimilation into the larger society. The disciplines of History and Sociology are used to examine problems, including social and ethical issues, encountered by immigrants, United States citizens, and policy makers. Topics will include a historical examination of immigration policy, push/pull factors that influence immigration, and settlement patterns within the United States. Prepares students to identify immigration problems and research solutions.

Course usage information

PR-435   The Way and the Word: HinduismCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

A comparison of classic texts central to two Asian traditions, The Bhagavad Gita and The Analects; the impact of the ethos of each tradition on secular narratives, Asian and Western. The disciplines represented include Comparative Religion and Literature. Also listed as RS-435.

Course usage information

PR-436   Urban LegendsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

An examination of urban legends from multiple perspectives.

Course usage information

PR-437   Perspectives on the Human Experiences: Family ViolenceCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Designed as an interactive seminar course that engages students in interactive discussions and experiential exercises related to understanding and working with families who have experienced violence, including both survivors and perpetrators. The impact of culture on family violence across intergenerational family members (e.g., children, parents, and grandparents) and diverse populations and settings are thoroughly reviewed. Students learn a strengths-based empowerment approach and application of resiliency theory to assessment, prevention, intervention planning, and evaluation of individuals, families, and communities impacted by abuse and violence.

Course usage information

PR-438   Nature of the Self: East and WestCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

A comparative study of Asian and Western theories about the nature and definition of self using an interdisciplinary approach - philosophy, religion, and history.

Course usage information

PR-439   Interdisciplinary Perspective on Social BusinessCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): ISP

Micro-credit has become one of the most successful social business interventions in addressing poverty in the developing world. As a successful initiative, it is now traveling from the developing world to the developed world. Addresses the historical, philosophical, and theoretical underpinnings of social business, and will explore in an interdisciplinary approach the ethical and social issues related to social business. Social business, itself, is cross-disciplinary, providing a basis for working together, transcending our differences across disciplinary lines, and envisioning creating a world without poverty.

Course usage information

PR-440   Violent CrimeCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Nature and distribution of violent crime in American society and other nations; causal theories of violence and factors correlated with violence; relationship between gender and violent crime; policy strategies to reduce violent victimization. The disciplines represented include: Biology, Psychology, and Sociology.

Course usage information

PR-441   Countercultures in American HistoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Explores countercultures in the United States from multiple-disciplinary perspectives including history, literature, and sociology. Elements from philosophy and psychology will also be included. The course will show that the counterculture in the 1960's was just one historical manifestation of American historical movements that are anti-authoritarian and espouse personal and/or societal transformation/regeneration. By examining different groups, the course will show that countercultures have a legacy of change in American society.

Course usage information

PR-442   Modern Images, Irrational ThoughtCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Philosophy from the time of Plato has been an evolution of ideas, one set replaced by another, in a dialogue that changes from what has become accepted as normal to an ever changing view derived from rational thought as it relates to the present and the projected future. As in Philosophy, Art has a cyclical evolution; 1) an initial intuitive leap of newness, 2) a refinement and loosely agreed upon normalcy and 3) a stage, for lack of better description, "Istic," where nothing new is brought about and contributors either branch out or embellish what they can't penetrate with a new leap. Through the two main disciplines of Art and Philosophy, the course will investigate changes in rationality in the late nineteenth Century and trace their movements and influences into the twenty-first.

Course usage information

PR-443   ESP, Yesterday and TodayCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

From the first Paleolithic Shaman to Madam Marie on the Boardwalk in the twenty-first Century, civilizations have been fascinated by visionaries, mediums, psychics, and those who claim to channel entities from alternative realities. Clairvoyance, Telepathy, Astral Projection, and Psychokinesis are all part of the hidden, or sixth sense referred to as Telesthesia. The idea has surfaced and influenced mankind from Egyptian Soothsayers, the Oracle of Delphi, Revelations in the Bible, Nostradamus, Madam Blavatsky, Edgar Cayce, and as recently as Jane Roberts in the late twentieth century and is taking modern form in the concept of The New Age. Through the main disciplines of History and Psychology, this course will investigate the ever-changing social attitudes and beliefs concerning Extra Sensory Perception from the cave dwellers to the modern carnival.

Course usage information

PR-444   Leadership, Public Health, and Higher EducationCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

The disciplines represented in this course are Education and Health Studies. Content focuses on problems, including social and ethical issues, encountered by leaders in Higher Education and Public Health. Topics will include leadership theories, practice, and evaluation. Prepares students to identify problems, research solutions, implement plans, and evaluate results that advance the mission of non-profit organizations committed to improving public health and institutions of Higher Education. Emphasis will be placed on issues involved in Higher Education and Public Health.

Course usage information

PR-445   Spike Lee and the Black Aesthetic in PerspectiveCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

An examination of race, gender, sexuality, and class in the cinematic representations developed by Spike Lee in connection with African-American aesthetic values. Spike Lee has been classified by many as the most important (and certainly most successful) African-American filmmaker in American history. The often controversial productions of Lee have been extensively examined by critics and scholars since his first film "She's Gotta Have It" was released. This class will consider various "Spike Lee Joints" from multiple perspectives including history, communication studies, sociology, and gender studies. We will critically examine Lee's work within the broad historical framework of African- American cultural history and in terms of his engagement with controversial social, political, and economic issues in American society in these films. The Lee films will also be analyzed for the aestheticization of larger historical, cultural, and social aspects of U.S. society. The two main disciplines utilized in the course include history and communication studies.

Course usage information

PR-446   The Confessional Poets: Surviving MadnessCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

An exploration of the works of key figures in the confessional style of contemporary American poetry. These poets suffered multiple levels of mental anguish and used confessional poetry to share and heal their suffering, as they attempted to survive their lives.

Course usage information

PR-447   A Graphic World: Sequential Art and World HistoryCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

An interdisciplinary course that will use the perspectives of historical, literary, and artistic analysis to examine important themes such as, but not limited to, nationalism, inequality, industrialization, war, religion, or cultural diffusion, through the medium of the graphic novel.

Course usage information

PR-448   Ecocriticism and Medieval EnglandCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

An ecocritical study of historical documents and literary texts in medieval England.

Course usage information

PR-449   The Helping Professions in Film and MediaCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Provides students an opportunity to look at ethical and social issues from a multidisciplinary perspective. Looks at the helping professions (for example: teachers, counselors, and medical professions), how the codes of ethics for these professions are similar but different, and how these professions have been villainized and romanticized in film.

Course usage information

PR-450   Propaganda in AmericaCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An analytic study of persuasive texts central to the development of American values and attitudes. Advertisements, tracts, and fiction will be placed in their historic, international, and intellectual contexts. The disciplines represented include rhetoric and literature.

Course usage information

PR-451   Ethnic and Religious Conflicts and Their Political ImplicationsCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Examines the relationship between ethnicity, nationalism and violence. Focus will be on the formation and the causes that ignite ethnic conflicts. Discussion of the political tools and strategies to manage them as well as the role of international communities in preventing and resolving these conflicts. To understand the international implications of the ethnic conflict we shall examine examples from around the world but we shall focus mainly on five cases: Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Ireland, Russia, and Palestine.

Course usage information

PR-452   Understanding and Producing Theatre And Its Role in Modern SocietyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Designed to allow students to examine Theatre in intense and very specific ways using and examining the literature and visual arts aspects of theatre. The course content will focus on the Summer season of the Shadow Lawn Stage or an appropriate selection of plays during the academic year. Students will not only discuss in class the plays being performed, but will also have the experience of watching them being designed, constructed, and rehearsed.

Course usage information

PR-453   Censoring Culture: Banned and Burned in the USACredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

An interdisciplinary study of censorship in modern America. Utilizing the combined methodologies of history and literary criticism, broadly construed to include feminist and cultural theory, it will explore specific instances of censorship in art, literature and history in twentieth- and twenty-first-century American culture. It will focus on the "reading" of censored texts, novels, paintings, photographs, newspapers and film as cultural artifacts and probe the nuances and boundaries of freedom of speech and expression in a democratic society.

Course usage information

PR-454   Word and ImageCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): ISP

Explores the relationship between the two basic modes of representation in our culture - words and pictures. The interaction between the two will be investigated historically and theoretically through a close examination of a variety of media, from books and posters to comics and Web sites. Emphasis is on the power of word-image representations to define social and ethical concerns and also shape our lives, as well as on the beauty of some works of "composite art" created by poets and artists, from William Blake to Art Spiegelman.

Course usage information

PR-456   Right Wing Extremism in EuropeCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): ISP

Presents a comparative analysis of several far-right organizations in Western Europe as well as the characteristics of the right wing extremism in Eastern Europe. The course will identify the causes that led to the popularity of these groups, sub-culture of the skin-heads and the neo-Nazi and the attitude of the far right groups in Eastern Europe towards the Roma population. We shall also analyze their consequences for the political stability and democracy in the European Union.

Course usage information

PR-457   Issues in Cognitive ScienceCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Focuses on a number of key ideas about mental representations (e.g., logic, rules, concepts, and analogies) and contrasts how work in psychology (e.g., building computational models) helps us to evaluate their suitability as models of the human mind and of the nature of intelligence in general. Cognitive Science is an inherently interdisciplinary approach to the study of the mind and intelligence, drawing upon work in philosophy, psychology, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, linguistics and anthropology. The course will touch on many of these areas, but the focus is work in the disciplines of psychology and artificial intelligence. The course will also cover the ethical implications of work in cognitive science.

Course usage information

PR-458   The Meaning of MeaningCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): ISP

Focuses on the various perspectives about meaning that have developed in the philosophical literature and their applications to actual language use as uncovered by linguists and anthropologists. Efforts to understand the meaning of meaning have been carried out in a variety of disciplines; philosophy, psychology, literary studies, artificial intelligence, linguistics and anthropology. Although the course will touch on many of these areas, the focus is on the work in the disciplines of philosophy, linguistics, and anthropology. The course will also cover the social and ethical implications of the different approaches to the meaning of meaning.

Course usage information

PR-459   The Science and Politics of Climate ChangeCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): ISP, SUS

Earth's climate has changed in the past and will change in the future; however, current climate science describes a rate of climate change expected in the next hundred years that is similar to those experienced during mass extinctions in the past. This rate of change implies emergency conditions for most living creatures including man, and a need for urgent action if human caused contributions to climate change are to be stopped or slowed. This course will examine the science and politics of climate change with an emphasis on understanding the physical science behind climate change, the biological impacts of changing climate in a variety of biomes, suggested political and physical remediation and the political consequences of suggested remediation. This course will also examine the actions of certain lobbyists, political parties, and multinational corporations and their impacts on the politics of climate change.

Course usage information

PR-460   How Technology Affects ValuesCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

The correlation of values to technology; conceptualization of the interrelationships among science, technology, values, and society. Preparing to understand technical innovation, the impact of technical innovations on the quality of life, and the need for critical evaluation of societal matters involving the consequences of technology. The disciplines represented include History and Sociology.

Course usage information

PR-461   The Great Recession and its Effect on SocietyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): ISP

The Great Recession officially began in December 2007 and ended in June 2009. The severity and extended duration of the second biggest economic downturn in history have inflicted long-lasting damage on individuals, families, and communities. This course will explore the historical sequence of events, similarities with the Great Depression, business and government decisions, and the theoretical underpinnings culminating in the Great Recession. Emphasis is given to the evaluation of the aftermath- the severe adverse effect on society! The course explores economics, decision-making, ethics, political and social issues - knowledge essential to the intellectual development of future leaders.

Course usage information

PR-469   Mind Over MatterCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Course Type(s): ISP

Will provide students with an overview of two conflicting explanations of how the mind works to define the universe, the interactions of mind/body in relation to the 21st Century, and consideration of ethical and social issues.

Course usage information

PR-470   War and PeaceCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

An exploration of the forces leading toward war and peace in our century. Through literature, history, and sociology, the course looks at the dynamics of the two world wars, the development and use of nuclear weapons and the subsequent arms race, and rapidly evolving, current situations, such as the dissolution of the Soviet Union, tensions in the Middle East, and the role of the United States in the "New World Order." The disciplines represented in the course include Literature, History, and Sociology.

Course usage information

PR-471   The Historical NovelCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): ISP

Explores the history of the historical novel from Sir Walter Scott to the present and the impact that historical novels have on the way in which we perceive the past. Students will examine the ways in which the authors of historical novels are influenced by the times in which they are writing and the dynamic relationship between the times of the author and the historical period about which he or she is writing. The course will also trace developments in both history and literature that have contributed to the evolution of the historical novel in the past two centuries.

Course usage information

PR-472   Management Lessons Through the Arts and LiteratureCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Spring Term

Course Type(s): ISP

Bridges business management with the arts and literature. Students will explore the link between management practices and some of the great works of literature, theatre, poetry, music, art, architecture, photography, film, and television.

Course usage information

PR-473   Twentieth Century PsychoanalysisCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: Fall Term

Course Type(s): ISP

Psychoanalysis has been one of the most influential and controversial traditions in 20th century and contemporary thought. What began as a method for healing psychic neuroses in suffering patients has developed into a philosophical paradigm for conceptualizing the human condition. Ironically banished from a meaningful place in psychology departments, psychoanalysis has found willing disciples in literature, sociology, philosophy and mostly left-wing politics. Yet, psychoanalysis has been adopted as an interpretative framework by both rightists and leftists, by conservatives and liberals alike. The interdisciplinary nature of psychoanalysis makes it fruitful for a humanities-oriented perspective course. This class concentrates on the intersection of psychoanalysis with literature and philosophy. It seeks to study the cultural and social significance of psychoanalysis through the material impact of literature and philosophy.

Course usage information

PR-480   The Spiritual Experience (In Literature and Philosophy)Credits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Selected writings of religious literature and philosophy, including poetry, spiritual autobiography, meditations, and works of devotion and mysticism in the light of the cultural moment that produced them. Writings of both East and West, of men and women, and of varied cultures and historical eras. The disciplines represented include literature and philosophy.

Course usage information

PR-490   Revolution and Creative ResponseCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): ISP

Revolution and Creative Response will study three revolutions: the Industrial Revolution, the Soviet Revolution, and the South African Revolution - the historical conditions, the critical events, and the central people. It will then analyze how certain artists responded or reacted to these. Combines elements of history and textual analysis (the methods used in the study of literature or film).

Course usage information

PR-495   Coping with ConflictCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Approaches to coping with conflict, drawn from the perspectives of law (focusing on negotiation and mediation) and of social psychology (focusing on processes of escalation, de-escalation, and settlement). Students will integrate these perspectives by devising strategies for dispute resolution in settings, such as the home, university, and the work place. The disciplines represented include law and social psychology.

Course usage information

PR-496   Plant Biotechnology and SocietyCredits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Students will learn and understand the principles of modern food production, with emphasis on plant biotechnology and ethics of genetically modified (GM) foods. In addition, the needs of a growing world population and economical, sociological, and demographical aspects associated with present food production will be addressed. Presents an integrated view of plant biotechnology and its effects on society. The objective is to help students be able to better understand and evaluate the potential of GM foods in both developed and developing countries and to address the ethical questions of modern agriculture.

Course usage information

PR-498   Special Topics in Perspectives (400 Level)Credits: 3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

An intensive study of a particular subject or problem in perspectives to be announced prior to registration.

Course usage information

PR-499   Independent Study in PerspectivesCredits: 1-3   

Prerequisite: Completion of eighty-seven credits.

Term Offered: All Terms

Course Type(s): None

Guided research and in-depth study of a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member.